ibm pc

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Chris Kennedy's picture

Piracy Troubles Finally Solved

After years of struggle between those that would create software and those that would steal it, Capcom has finally found the perfect, DRM-free way to prevent people from stealing the PC version of Super Street Fighter IV.

They're just not going to release it.

Chris Kennedy's picture

Building a Retro Gaming PC - Part 3

I had planned to discuss software a bit with Part 3, however I've decided to focus on the hardware changes I have made to this system since Part 2. Some of these improvements have taken old hardware and replaced it with old hardware of higher quality. Other improvements have replaced old hardware with new hardware made in recent years. Nevertheless, the system remains retro. Taking old hardware and modifying it with the intention to slightly modernize it always creates the fear in me that my purist membership card will be revoked. While I have great appreciation for emulation and the programming behind it (I am a programmer, myself), I prefer the real hardware over emulation any day of the week.
Chris Kennedy's picture

Building a Retro Gaming PC - Part 2

Let's continue the Retro Gaming PC Adventure(TM), shall we?

Since my first post, the machine has gone through a few minor revisions. I went with the Pentium build, and the system is coming along nicely. I'll detail some of the specs here.
Chris Kennedy's picture

Building a Retro Gaming PC - Part 1

Dosbox.

I have to start this blog entry with that word because it is the most common response I receive upon stating that I am building an old PC. Emulation is great, but this is the real thing. I am going to build a retro PC. My question to you is - Which hardware would you use to build a classic gaming PC?

Matt Barton's picture

Book Review: "Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer" (1993)

Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer, authored by--you guessed it, Stan Veit--is a roughly edited collection of memoirs and editorials Veit wrote during his tenure as editor-in-chief of Computer Shopper. Veit's personal experience with personal computer history is tremendous. He was the first personal computer dealer in New York City, and got to know almost every early luminary in the industry on a first-name basis. He's one part technician (he can talk chips and boards with the best of them), one part salesman, and one part patron. In short, it's hard to find an author better qualified to take us on the journey from the Altair to the IBM PC. However, the book is not without its flaws--it's poorly organized, and the typos make your head hurt.

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