graphical adventure games

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Matt Barton's picture

Review: Kheops Studio's "Voyage: Inspired by Jules Verne" (2005)

Voyage: Lush graphics, awesome story, great puzzles, witty dialog...Bon voyage!Voyage: Lush graphics, awesome story, great puzzles, witty dialog...Bon voyage!Kheops Studio's "Voyage: Insired by Jules Verne," published in the US by the Adventure Company in 2005, is one of the best graphical adventure games I've seen in recent years. It features compelling gameplay, multiple ways to solve puzzles, and a good, solid story based on the works of celebrated French author Jules Verne (one of the true godfathers of science fiction). The puzzles are clever, the script is fun--in short, it's worth checking out, even if you aren't normally a fan of Myst-style games.

Funcom to Follow Dreamfall with Dreamfall Chapters

No doubt following Telltale Games' lead with the success of Sam & Max Season One, Funcom recently announced plans to develop Dreamfall Chapters, an online episodic sequel to the recent GAG Dreamfall: The Longest Journey.

Here's a bit from the press release:

. Funcom naturally welcomes the continued cultural acceptance of computer games as a medium comparable to film and television. Fans can now look forward to new online chapters in one of the most popular adventure sagas of all time.

Each new installment of ‘Dreamfall Chapters’ will initially be delivered as online-only content, but there may be retail releases with combined chapters, both for console and PC, at a later stage.

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Amazing Media's Frankenstein: Through the Eyes of the Monster (1997)

Amazing Media's Frankenstein: Through the Eyes of the Monster is a fantastic game, and I'm stunned that it hasn't received more attention from serious GAG fans. Tim Curry's performance as the demented Dr. Frankenstein is wonderful, but that's not all this game has to offer. Great atmosphere, story, black humor, and intuitive puzzles--what more could a GAG fan ask for? I give this one two thumbs up--(and who knows whom those thumbs used to belong to?)

Matt Barton's picture

Review: Her Interactive's "Nancy Drew: The Creature of Kapu Cave" (2006)

"The Creature of Kapu Cave," the 15th episode in the popular Nancy Drew graphical adventure game series, scores big in some areas and misses in others. In some ways, this is the strongest entry in the series, scoring particularly high marks in graphics and interface. The problems are a bit trickier to isolate. Essentially, the problem is making a long story short. I've been covering Her Interactive's Nancy Drew games for some time now, and this one felt the briefest. Of course, that's not always a problem, and I prefer a game that leaves me wanting more rather than one I can't wait to be over. Unfortunately, what's abridged here are some of the most charming qualities of the series--fun, well-developed characters, intrigue, and plot twists. The focus here is mostly on a series of simple mini-games, all held together with the Hawaiian theme.

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