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Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark Plays... Flappy Bird (C64)


Flappy Bird - the legendary game has reached the innards of the good old Commodore 64! Yes, it has been ported and it can be found for free over here: http://www.c64.com/games/2369 .
It looks very easy but it is not. The sense of accomplishment one receives is actually quite amazing and it is disturbingly addictive.

Thanks to MaximumRD, aka Rob Daviau, for pointing this out! Wait, not actually sure I am thankful as well... the game has its drawbacks. :P

Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark Plays... Centipede (IBM-PC/MS-DOS)(CGA)(1983)


Centipede on the IBM PC programmed by R.J.Grafe in 1983. It's not the official port by Atarisoft but another release sporting quite an innovative control scheme. It actually features a simulation of the trackball found on the original arcade game. It uses the space bar for firing and the cursor keys to move around the little gun-turret. Pressing a directional key is similar to giving the trackball a swirl. Pressing multiple times in rapid succesion is like giving the trackball more momentum. A bit of an indirect control scheme but it really works well. With this control scheme in place this actually makes for an excellent port.

Take a look at the video and see how I fared.

Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark plays... Robotron 2084 on C64 (dual joystick mode)

This mode does exist in this C64 version and also on the Atari 8-bit version of the game!

The C64 port of the game shown here running on a PAL C64G (the German Aldi version with the C128 CPU) playing with two Suzo Arcade Sticks in port 1&2.
I run the program on the 1541UltimateII, the first version is trained and halfway the video I realize that and load up the cartridge version that is unmodified.

Intro soundtrack by Andy C. aka SynthMonkey aka ZombieAndy1979
http://www.youtube.com/user/zombieandy1979

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Bill Loguidice's picture

The Space Invaders TRS-80 'Bootleg' Project

This looks a bit old, but this person apparently successfully ported the real Space Invaders arcade game to a TRS-80 Model 4/4P with hi-res board (the board being the x-factor here and something few of us with TRS-80 collections have (I don't)).

Pretty extraordinary stuff and as the author says, probably the first of its kind ever attempted. As we know, someone did something similar on the far more capable (though no less impressive of a technical achievement) TRS-80 Color Computer 3 with arcade Donkey Kong.

Keep in mind that the Model 4 came out in 1983, based off of a platform first released in 1977, and the Color Computer 3 came out in 1987, based off of a platform first released in 1980!

Bill Loguidice's picture

A Fresh Perspective on Old Arcade to Home Translations

Zaxxon for the Apple II: Is it really a bad thing that this version of the game is not arcade perfect?Zaxxon for the Apple II: Is it really a bad thing that this version of the game is not arcade perfect?It used to be that home videogame or computer translations of arcade games were judged on how closely they mimicked the source material. This included how many levels were brought over - memory constraints often meant that one or more stages were left on the cutting room floor (Donkey Kong translations were rarely complete, for instance) - how accurate the graphics and animation were (did Pac-Man look like Pac-Man?), whether or not the sound captured the intended spirit (did Asteroids provide enough of a bass effect?), and how well the controls matched up (like angling the joystick for Q*bert), among many other areas.

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