criticism

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/buckman/public_html/neo/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Matt Barton's picture

Matt Chat 126: Jay Barnson on Dealing with Criticism

Hi, guys! I'm back this week with part 3 of my interview with Jay Barnson. This is probably my favorite segment, with some really heartfelt discussion about dealing with criticism and struggling on despite a lack of financial resources. There's also plenty of sight gags, including a special Skyrim book, a blistering "major site" review of Frayed Knights, and much more!

I'm up to 6,324 subscribers--still 676 left to go if I'm going to make my 7K by 2012 goal. Please help spread the word by posting this or other episodes on your favorite blog, forum, or social networking sites.
Download the video here: mattchat126.mp4.
Download the audio here: mattchat126.mp3.
As always, if you like what you see, consider setting up a subscription ($5 a month is most excellent) or one-time donation. The subscriptions work great; just set it and forget it, no need to bother with it again. And you can, of course, cancel at any time. $5 a month is nothing to you, but everything to me. :)

Action Button features Intelligent Ultra Negative Reviews

Action Button is a recent video game review blog that reminds one of Howard Beale from the 1976 flick Network-- they're mad as hell and they're not going to take it anymore! The reviews are honest, harsh, and to the point, if a bit full of florid vocabulary.

Their modus operandi, according to their "about" page, is rather lengthy, but it boils down to being rather refreshing-- "We're going to play games for a bare minimum of two hours each and we'll let you know when, where, and why we stop playing; a great game should make us forget our day job."

Let's take a look at a few excerpts from some of Action Button's reviews. One thing I appreciate about them is that they don't give a good review unless they mean it.

Matt Barton's picture

Games as Great Works?: Serious Game Criticism

What are the greatest videogames ever made? No doubt, you've read just as many silly top-ten, top-twenty, top-fifty, and top-one-hundred lists as I have trying to answer this deceptively simple and straightforward question. The question is actually anything but simple and straightforward. It's a profound question that reaches as deeply into our gaming hearts as a stiletto dagger, and, until we can answer it convincingly--for all time--then we folks who style ourselves as "serious game critics" might vacate the premises, tails tucked tersely. In this article, I'll try to explain what makes the question so difficult, hopefully opening up and further expanding the friendly conversation begun in my post on Elite.

Syndicate content