emulation

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Bill Loguidice's picture

N64/GB/GBC Combi and Atari 2600 Plug-in Adapters being Prepared for Retrode USB Adapter

RetrodeRetrodeJust a quick bit of breaking news that the Retrode (formerly: snega2usb), a USB adapter for playing Super Nintendo/Famicom and Sega Mega Drive/Genesis cartridges legally on your PC, smartphone, laptop, network router, Wii, Pandora, etc., will soon have N64/GB/GBC combi and Atari 2600 plug-in adapters. Great news for a product with an ever expanding feature-set.

Check the official update below for more details or simply visit the Website:

Bill Loguidice's picture

PR: Cloanto Releases Amiga Forever 2009

I just got this press release in and thought it important enough to share right away for all of you Commodore Amiga and would-be/should-be Commodore Amiga fans. This is a great LEGAL emulation package based on a legendary platform for modern PCs and well worth checking out. I'll try to have some type of review up soon.

BEGIN PRESS RELEASE:

Bill Loguidice's picture

Mattel Intellivision Cuttle Cart 3 is Now Available for Pre-Orders!

Main Menu for the Cuttle Cart 3: Mattel IntellivisionMain Menu for the Cuttle Cart 3: Mattel IntellivisionChad Schell, creator of the famous "Cuttle Cart" multi/flash cart series for the Atari 2600 and 7800, has spun his magic again, this time for the Mattel Intellivision as the "Cuttle Cart 3". It's been a very long time since the Intellivision has had anything like this available, and the good news is is that this improves on past efforts for the system by being fully flashable and making use of MiniSD cards. The only downside (at least for me) is that it won't load the Enhanced Computer System (ECS) World Series Major League Baseball ROM, one of the most impressive early baseball games, and one of the few games I've been so far unable to acquire on cartridge for the Intellivision that I've wanted (and the only one I"m missing for the ECS add-on).

At $150 plus shipping and handling, it's not cheap, but it's still one of those undeniable "must buys" for collectors and enthusiasts, particularly since this will be yet another limited production run. It even works as a development system. I ordered mine, just like I previously ordered the "Cuttle Cart 2" for the 7800/2600. Full details here, including photos and manuals.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Version 2.6 of blueMSX released and Brief discusson of the Game Reader

Sunrise MSX Game ReaderSunrise MSX Game ReaderOne of the first USB cartridge readers called the "MSX Game Reader" from Japan, is currently available (also under the Sunrise USB-GAMEREADER name as an alternate English supplier), and essentially allows you to play real MSX cartridges on a standard Windows XP PC. The product comes with the MSXPLAYer, which does a good job with emulation. However, the latest version of the freeware blueMSX, 2.6, now supports the device as well. This is great news for those who want the MSX experience without having to maintain an MSX computer or even multiple systems for maximum compatibility (MSX 1, MSX2, Turbo-R, etc.), so the more options, the better (I only have a Sony HB-F1XD MSX2 computer myself). It's unfortunate then that the hardware is so relatively expensive, but perhaps this will inspire others to implement related technology for other classic systems as well.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Atari 2600 Plug 'N Play Keychain - Expect More, Get Less

Basic Fun's Officially Licensed Atari 2600 Plug 'N Play Keychain Series: {Image from the Basic Fun Website}Basic Fun's Officially Licensed Atari 2600 Plug 'N Play Keychain Series: {Image from the Basic Fun Website}While this is hardly breaking news, it's been interesting to follow some of the drama around the "Atari 2600 Plug 'N Play Keychain" series from "Basic Fun". The first part of the drama involves the company's falling out with engineer Curt Vendel, most famous for being the lead on the "Atari Flashback" and "Atari Flashback 2.0" products, and launching "Awesome Arcades". The second and more relevant part of the drama involves the simple fact that these products, amazing form factor and low price aside ($15 each), are awful simulations, seemingly ignoring all the progress made over the past few years in TV Game quality (in fact, reverting back to the NES-on-a-chip of the first Flashback, which has been proven unable to properly simulate Atari 2600 games!). Perhaps "Basic Fun" should have just went with the quality product that Curt had originally delivered for them, rather than scrapping it and doing the products on the super cheap!

While the "Atari Flashback" was a weak simulation of both the Atari 7800 and 2600 systems using the readily available NES-on-a-chip as the platform, the "Atari Flashback 2.0" rectified this by incorporating a clever Atari 2600-on-a-chip, almost perfectly emulating the original hardware. After that and the prior "Commodore 64 30-in-1" (which essentially featured a C-64-on-a-chip), it's hard to go back to the kind of innaccuracies that are present in these keychain devices. Bottom line, the bar has been raised and we truly have the right to expect more, based simply on precedent and the countless other TV Games devices out there that do offer more authentic experiences, even of latter day systems like the Sega Genesis or arcade machines.

Matt Barton's picture

RadioShack and the Origins of PC Gaming

Someone calling himself "DeadDrPhibes" has a great post up at The Older Gamers Paradise called The Birth of PC Gaming. The author takes us on a little tour of the earliest days of home PCs and gaming, starting with furniture-sized monstrosities and ending up with the Apple Mac and the Windows PC. He strikes me as a died-in-the-wall TRS-80 man, and spends good time discussing Radio Shack and Texas Instruments' entries in the home computing market (the CoCo, and so on). It's a fun read, even if it seems to be drafted mostly from the author's own experiences and memories. At any rate, it's nice to see a history like this from this perspective, since most "history-lite" like this I've read has focused mostly on the Apple, Commodore, or IBM. Now all I'm waiting for is a great feature on the Atari line of home computers.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Retrogaming and Beyond on Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger

Author and Screenshots: Mark J.P. Vergeer
Editing: Cecil Casey, Mathew Tschirgi and Bill Loguidice
Online Layout: Cecil Casey and David Torre

Matt Barton's picture

Classic PC Games on Your PSP

PSPPSPAlthough PSP owners content to run official commercial titles for their system are safer to avoid homebrew, there's no denying that the emulation scene for the popular portable is extending at a massive rate: Now you can run scads of classic PC games on your PSP, including SCUMM adventure games (which I'd rather play than Doom).

Matt Barton's picture

Backwards Compatibility: Progressive or, er, Backwards?

Acorn BBC Micro: Do you care that this machine isn't backwards compatible with your PC?Acorn BBC Micro: Do you care that this machine isn't backwards compatible with your PC?Brian Crecente of Kotaku seems upset about some comments from Peter Moore, VP of Microsoft Gaming. Moore claims that Microsoft "underpromised and over-delivered with backwards compatability, and that people just don't care enough about BC to make it worth the investment. Let me add my two cents: Moore is right: Backwards compatability IS backwards. BC is simply an ineffective and inefficient means of hedging the bets with a new platform. Everyone is better off with a clean break and a fresh start.

Matt Barton's picture

Dead Games and Eternal Emulation

Blade of Blackpool: Nice tavern. You won't find it in Redmond.Blade of Blackpool: Nice tavern. You won't find it in Redmond.Every now and then I read an article that makes me stop and wonder about the Big Picture. What will history students a hundred years from now read, if anything, about my lifetime? Will they "read" at all? An article that did that for me today was The Dead Formats Society by someone named Momus. How is the brief half-life of most digital formats affecting our culture and its future? This is probably a question that all of us here at Armchair Arcade have asked at one time or another, since we're constantly faced with the problem of getting old games for "obsolete" systems to run on our modern hardware.

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