collector

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Bill Loguidice's picture

Quick Thoughts on One Nice Way to Convert SCART (PAL/SECAM) in the US (and G7401/Odyssey3 comments)

As any hardcore videogame and computer collector knows, there are many intriguing classic systems out there worthy of your time that never made it to your home territory. One of the biggest challenges when importing vintage systems from foreign countries is having the necessary hardware on hand to convert either or both of the power (voltage) and video (television standard) connections.

With vintage Japanese systems in the US, it's fairly trivial to use those systems here. Generally speaking, the video signal is the same - though you may have to tune in a weird channel if you're stuck using an RF connection - and power requirements are similar, generally 100-110v to our 110-120v. While you can usually get away with just plugging a Japanese system direct into a US outlet, a simple power converter is still recommended in some situations. With vintage European systems, it's not nearly as straightforward, since they use a completely different television standard and power requirements usually run 220-240v, so you need to do double conversions. On top of that, plugs for both video and power are often unusual shapes and may require yet another adapter.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Limited edition signed copies of Intellivision Lives! for the Nintendo DS, plus additional bonuses, now available!

I thought I would pass along this note from Intellivision Productions. For a limited time you can order a Keith Robinson-signed copy of Intellivision Lives! for the Nintendo DS direct from the Intellivision rights holders, and they'll even throw in a free running man DS button, as well as a $5 off coupon good for a future purchase. All this for $19.95 plus shipping and handling, but the catch is there will only 200 of these available, so get cracking! Official announcement below:

Bill Loguidice's picture

2006 AtariAge Holiday Sale and Toyshop Trouble Cart Giveaway!

Our friends over at AtariAge have incredible online store deals for the Atari VCS 2600 and Atari 7800 Pro System going on now. Check out the new homebrew stuff! Information below:

Bill Loguidice's picture

Do Computer and Videogame Collectors Have an Overriding Responsibility?

The Warp Factor (SSI, 1981): Front of box image from an eBay auctionThe Warp Factor (SSI, 1981): Front of box image from an eBay auctionAh, the wonders of eBay. While you can occasionally get a hard-to-find game for a low price with lots of luck - say maybe $35 with shipping - other times you'll see boxed software go for ridiculous prices that no mere mortal can afford, like SSI's classic "The Warp Factor" for the Apple II, with a very recent final sale price before shipping of $449.44! Even though it's sealed, it's still an amazingly over-the-top winning bid. As is usual with SSI games - particularly pre-1986 SSI games - the cover artwork is beautiful and there are nice extras inside the oversized box. A fine specimen or not (though this one is actually a bit crushed!), average-to-good game itself or not, it can't help but make you reflect on the meaning of collecting, particularly as it applies to our hobby.

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Video Game Collector Magazine #6 - Featuring Armchair Arcade and Bill Loguidice

NEC Turbo Duo: Photo - Bill LoguidiceNEC Turbo Duo: Photo - Bill LoguidiceWell, the narcissist in me just had to make mention of the fact that my NEC TurboGrafx-16/Duo-based interview and review is making the rounds in the very recently released (or soon to be released depending on your status), "Video Game Collector" magazine #6, Summer 2006 (they print them quarterly). It is or will be available at select retail outlets and popular online Websites, including their own, which is http://www.vgcollector.com/ .

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A Videogame and Computer Collector's Problems with Moving - Lessons Learned and Photos

Well, as many of you know, several of us here at Armchair Arcade have been in the process of moving or have recently moved. I'm finally in the "recently moved" category after being in the former for a little over a month. As many of you also know, I'm very much into collecting computer and videogame-related stuff, hardware, software, books, accessories, collectibles, etc. Pretty much anything and everything relevant. Unfortunately, the bigger the collection, the harder the move.

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Historical Thoughts on Computer and Videogame Collecting

Commodore's SuperPET: From the collection of Bill LoguidiceCommodore's SuperPET: From the collection of Bill LoguidiceIt was back on February 7, 2006, that Matt Barton and I collaborated again publicly for the first time since early 2005. Of course we were working together behind the scenes to kick-start Armchair Arcade's rebirth prior to that, but the now defunct Computer Collector Newsletter's 100th issue was where some of the more observant Armchair Arcadian's would first catch a glimpse of what was to come again. In the interest of historical preservation, I present what was eventually published in that newsletter's 100th issue, complete with edits and changes by newsletter editor, Evan Koblentz:

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