classic

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Bill Loguidice's picture

Just say No to kids react to old computers

I hate that the latest "kids react to old computers" video (this time centered around the Apple II) is making the rounds everywhere. Besides the fact that this same click-bait gimmick has been done multiple times before with other computers, it proves nothing. You can put just about anyone of any age in front of just about any old computer and they likely won't know what to do with it beyond possibly knowing how to insert removable media and then stumbling around for the rest. Every computer back then had its own set of commands and own way of working beyond the basics. Even someone who is highly skilled in one or another brand of vintage computer won't necessarily have a clue how to work with a completely different brand of vintage computer. I've certainly experienced this phenomena myself, especially since I work with dozens of different vintage computers each year (Pro Tip: Keeping command "cheat sheets" handy is a big help!).

And no, today's computers and mobile devices haven't made anyone "stupid" or "lazy." Today's computers and mobile devices - as you would hope from almost 40 years of evolution in the home - are merely more user friendly. Personal computers back then always strived for that as well, but there were obvious limits given the technology. [Read more]

Bill Loguidice's picture

The real meaning of vintage when it comes to computers and videogames?

Inspired by a discussion on the Mid-Atlantic Retro Computing Hobbyists Yahoo! Group related to the recent VCF East 9.1 event and whether certain computing platforms should or should not be present at the museum location, I decided to offer up my thoughts on the often argued issue of what exactly constitutes "vintage" when it comes to computing hardware. Of course, me being me, I'll touch on videogame and mobile hardware as well.

It has been said that there's no one right answer for what constitutes "vintage," as it's naturally a constantly expanding target due to the simple passage of time. While this is true in the absolute sense, it doesn't mean that we as a community can't create an effective dividing line, no matter how much time passes, particularly once we introduce the concept of "intrinsic value" being tied to "vintage." For instance, I think we can all pretty much agree that generic PC DOS and Windows systems past a certain vintage - say mid-1980s - are generally out, which covers nearly all of the countless PC clones that continue to get produced to this day. It's not that some of these don't meet the basic criteria necessarily, it's that there's nothing notable about these boxes that anyone and everyone, be it a company or individual, could, did, and still do put together. It's even arguable that some of the parts - particularly certain expansion cards, like for video or sound - are worth more than the sum of the box, which is pretty telling for how we should generally value them in our determination of what is "vintage" and worth preserving and appreciating. [read more]

Bill Loguidice's picture

The Wall Street Journal on Computer Collecting

I was interviewed for a computer collecting feature for The Wall Street Journal several months back, and the piece finally hit both the newspaper and online today. While neither of my two contributed photos made it in (which I've included below) due in part to a slight change in direction of the piece, several of my quotes still made it in. While I wish the piece was a bit longer (as I thought originally planned), I'm still heartened by the positive coverage this segment of our industry has gotten in a quality publication. Check it out online here. Photos below:

Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark Plays... Dragon Saber (PCEngine/TG16)(NTSC)


The sequel to Dragon Spirit, a game by Namco falling into the shmup category. Released in 1991 about 3 years after the 1st game. The cool bit about this game is that it actually has a two player mode which I can't show as I can't control two controllers at the same time. It features organic end-of-level bosses that you will find in many other shmups of this golden era of the shmup.
The Wii (Virtual Console) as well as the Playstation (Namco Museum Encore) got ports of this game so it is also available on newer systems.

If you are interested in the 1st game in this 2 game series check out Dave Webster's video on the 1st game called 'Dragon Spirit'
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=huQBLle9nqM
This video was inspired by him as I heard him mention he didn't own the sequel so I figured I'd show my little gameplay on it.

Check out Dave Webster's channel:
https://www.youtube.com/user/DaveWebster

Chip Hageman's picture

Big K (Vintage UK gaming magazine)

Big K magazine was a short lived multiformat video game magazine that was active in the U.K. from April 1984 to March 1985. It was published by IPC Magazines Ltd and was edited by the late Tony Tyler.

One of the projects that I've had on the back burner for a while, was to begin to organize my collection of vintage gaming magazines and post them online so that others could access them. Big K is the first magazine series to go live... Mainly because it's a short series (testing the waters to see if there's interest), but also because it's somewhat obscure and many of you may not have encountered it before.

If there's interest in seeing other vintage gaming periodicals posted then let me know. But for now, let's enjoy some vintage gaming journalism!

Bill Loguidice's picture

CES 2010 Breaking News: Microsoft Announces "Microsoft Game Room" for Xbox 360 and PC with tons of Classic Gaming Goodness!

Microsoft Game Room ImageMicrosoft Game Room ImageAccording to a Microsoft Press Release and confirmed at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Microsoft will be releasing something called the "Microsoft Game Room" some time this spring, and, within three years, will see the release of over 1000 classic videogame titles, including arcade, Atari and Mattel Intellivision games, the latter of which was confirmed by Facebook friend Keith Robinson of Blue Sky Rangers fame as one of the available launch systems (other systems TBC). Apparently this area will be avatar-based, where your Xbox avatar will roam an arcade-like setting to find and play games (a bit like Sony's Home on PS3). There's a two-tier price structure, with one being an outright purchase of the game in question, and the other being a low cost, single play option, just like putting a quarter in an arcade machine in the days of old. We'll keep you posted as more news develops, but this is great news for those of us - like the readers of Armchair Arcade - who are passionate about classic gaming. The more love the current three consoles give (and each already has given a lot) to gaming's past, the better it is for all us as gamers, particularly since it looks like this is going to be a long generation with the big three. It's unclear how this will work with the PC as of this writing, but the fact that PC gamers are being invited to the party just makes it all the better, as well as the fact that owning it on one gives you access to it on the other.

Rob Daviau's picture

Data Age Mindscape FlexiDisc - Woah! Trippy man!

Rob Daviau's picture

WHY do we collect classic games?

Hey guys! Another video this time a response to an awesome question "Why do we collect Classic games?"
Please chime in with your own response and opinions THANKS!

Rob Daviau's picture

Free BENEATH THE STEEL SKY adventure game.

I just came across this, don't know how long it has been or will remain available but I figured a great free game from a great site there is no better time to check it out/sign up. I did a video to let my Youtube subscribers know but they are doing site maintenance right now DOH! Thought I would fill you guys in to! Below my original post/info (On my Facebook group)
BENEATH THE STEEL SKY

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