modding

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/buckman/public_html/neo/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Matt Barton's picture

Commodore 64 obsolete in 2008? Yeah, right!

CNN of all places is running an article called What can you do with a Commodore 64? The article has some great quotations from folks who seem to know a few things, such as this great one from Daniel Mackey of NY:

"The current state of computing is crazy. Any time you buy a system it is already outdated. Back in the days of the Commodore you really didn't have to worry about that because the C64 was what it was -- other than expansion devices."

You tell'em, Daniel. We've talked incessantly here about the benefits of giving the software a little more time to catch up to the hardware. The article outlines several uses for a Commodore 64 (past and present), which range from music machine to emergency response. Definitely a fun an engaging read for anyone who loves the C-64.

Matt Barton's picture

On Cheaters: Some Thoughts on Trainers, Cheating, Hacking, and Gamer Ethics

Once a Cheater...: Oh, Pooh...Once a Cheater...: Oh, Pooh...When I was but a whippersnapper, playing bootlegged games on my dad's Commodore Amiga computer, the choice seemed obvious. If I could play the game with a "trainer," I did so. A "trainer" was a little piece of code, inserted into many cracked distributions of games, that allowed you to play through a game with infinite lives, invulnerability, or some other such option that would let you blaze through the game without fear of a premature "game over." I doubt I could have ever beaten games like Turrican and Blood Money without one of these trainers. The games were brutally difficult, and, besides, the appeal of these games (for me, at least) wasn't so much about developing lightning-fast reflexes as savoring the amazing graphics. It was also exhilerating just to deal massive amounts of carnage. The trainers seemed to eliminate the frustration and lower the bar to the point where an average kid could get all the way through some of the most difficult games of the era.

Matt Barton's picture

NES and Cell Phone Fun!

NESNESIf you're interested in exploring that strange world between Nintendo's classic system and cell phones, I have some interesting links for you today. The first involves NES emulation on the Motorola Q Mobile Phone. Check out someone playing Mario on just such a phone. Looks good, sounds good--but how about those controls? Nah. Another twist on this theme is this NES Cellphone Mod. Turn an old NES controller into a working Nokia 3200! Now, isn't this just the height of fashion? Of course, the obvious question here is whether some hacker can combine the two, so that we get a working phone and NES emulator inside an NES controller.

Matt Barton's picture

Mario Kart Mod for Half-Life 2 Engine

Mario Kart Source: A Half-Life 2 ModMario Kart Source: A Half-Life 2 ModIn the tradition of creative and unanticipated applications for game engines, Mario Kart Source is a Mario Kart 64 modding project for Half-Life 2. Judging by the screenshots and videoclips available on their homepage, this project might be something to keep an eye on. Mario Kart was always my favorite multiplayer racing game--good family fun. I'm sure it's also great for folks who bought Half-Life 2 and want to stretch their buck with a good homebrew mod for its engine. Unfortunately, it's unclear how long we will have to wait for the official release.

Syndicate content