linux

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Mark Vergeer's picture

My Experiences With The OUYA, What Are Yours?

OUYA Game ConsoleOUYA Game ConsoleA couple of months in I really really want to like it but I don't. I really don't. The concept is very cool, the Indie games for it are really cool and there's some great emulators out there for it BUT... there are too many negatives to make this right.

The controller just isn't up to standards, the thumb-pad touches the sides of the mold so it feels cheap and not well designed. What this also creates is a feeling of unresponsiveness on the thumb-pad button itself as it seems to get stuck in a depressed position quite often. The analog joysticks are actually the best bit of the controllers as they are of a good quality, but they do grind on the top of the controller's surface-plates creating a lot of plastic powder that will no doubt foul up button functionality in the future. The action buttons suffer a similar fate as the thumb-pad button - the holes on the surface of the controller are too narrow with too little margins for the buttons to move freely so they end up actually getting caught underneath the top of the controller. The touch interface area / mousepad is on the controller is actually quite nifty.

But there's more, read below to find out what it is...

Mark Vergeer's picture

GameMID Android Handheld Review - an 1hr in depth look (including gameplay & benchmarks) (HD)


A review of the GameMID Android Handheld produced by REP Electronics Ltd (Hong Kong based) that will be brought to the market by various vendors under various brands. My unit comes with 8Gb of memory, the bare minimum will be 4Gb, but 16Gb or 32Gb of Flash memory is possible depending on ways the resellers would like the setup.

This video contains a look at the device itself, the specifications, some live gameplay, a look at its guts, benchmarking it and comparing it to the JXD S3700B, the Archos Gamepad and the Nexus 7, HDMI captured gameplay of various Android native games and various emulators. Read more below.

Mark Vergeer's picture

Linux as a Desktop OS - how is it this time around?

Ever since the early 90s I have been experimenting with Linux. Editing the xconfig file with VI with all sorts of refresh rates and resolution values making sure not to make my monitor go poof in the dark. I am more or less system agnostic and like to tinker with all sorts of technologies and software so it is not in my nature to become a fan-boy or pick sides. I have been using Macs next to MS-DOS & Windows machines and have always more or less had a spare running some variant of Linux. Often with varying results where it was fairly easy to completely bugger up an install making you start all over again. The way to go was the command line interface combined with VI, both were not very intuitive and it could be a very nasty experience getting it all up and running. I never ended up replacing my desktop completely with a Linux install as there would always be cracks in the foundation, with certain things I needed not working or buggering up. So I stuck with Windows & OS X but the open-aspects of Linux really were a very big pull and I always kept an eye out for new Linux developments. So after many failed attempts to replace my Windows OS with Linux here I am trying it again to see if this time around it is all worth it.

Read more below to see/experience how it all went.

Bill Loguidice's picture

The Humble Indie Bundle #4 - Seven more Mac, Linux and Windows games for a price you name!

There's a new Humble Indie Bundle, #4, so of course we couldn't help but mention it. Contribute what you want for a bundle of up to seven awesome DRM-free games on Windows, Macintosh, and Linux: Shank, Super Meat Boy, NightSky, Jamestown, Bit.Trip Runner, Gratuitous Space Battles, and Cave Story+. You can choose your contribution to go to any split of Developers, Charity, and Humble Tip, the latter of which goes to Humble Bundle Inc. itself.

Give the promo video below a watch as well, as it's pretty darn entertaining in its own right:

Bill Loguidice's picture

The Humble Indie Bundle #3 Mach 2 - Another Amazing Deal for Windows, Macintosh and Linux Gamers!

One of our favorite "Pay What You Want", "DRM Free", "Cross Platform", and "Helps Charity" offers, The Humble Indie Bundle, is back for the third time (though, I think they already used #3!). The games in this bundle are Crayon Physics Deluxe, Cogs, VVVVVV, Hammerfight, and And Yet It Moves, and they work on Windows, Mac, and Linux (Steam key included!). So, head on over, name your price, and get playing!

Bill Loguidice's picture

Back in my day we used something called a "desktop computer" that stayed in one place, and we liked it!

I had recently written about what I perceive to be the false notion of console gaming holding PC gaming back (and, frankly, with a recent release like L.A. Noire and future releases like Skyrim, again, it's hard to make that argument outside of a purely superficial (audio/visual) - not contentual - standpoint). Perhaps, as this new article puts forth, it's not consoles, but tablets, that the traditional PC industry has more to worry about?

Of course, as far as I'm concerned, we're actually still at least a few years off from that happening, at least until Apple breaks the required link between their iOS devices and a computer equipped with iTunes (and that's a question of "when", not "if"). Android devices are of course close to completely breaking free of the computer tether, but there are other issues for those classes of devices to overcome first. Other tablet OS's, present and future, are probably somewhere in-between the two.

Interestingly, there's a girl here at my day job who had bought an iPad 2 about a month back and then recently got an iPhone 4, but was frustrated that there was no way to copy what was on her iPad 2 (purchases) over to the iPhone 4. You see, she considers her computer horribly outdated and really didn't want to go through iTunes on her rickety old PC! Obviously, very flawed thinking, but it's very interesting what the non-techies have in their thought processes (and in this case how she wants to basically compute outside of work exclusively on the iPad 2 and iPhone 4)... Definitely a paradigm shift of some type! In any case, it's the old argument that it's not so much computers that are being challenged, it's the limited generalized definition of what a computer is that is being challenged. Does a computer really mean that desktop or laptop many of use a good portion of the day? Sure, but that's not all it means. As an iPad 2 user - outside of the tethering restriction for the occasional iTunes sync - I can argue that my tablet is as much of a computer as most desktops and laptops, with strikingly similar functionality (and in some cases, then some).

Ultimately, I think it's clear we're all headed to a connected eco-system of devices, where a lot of stuff is in the cloud, with minimal need for local storage. You'll simply use whatever device is handy or whatever is best suited to a particular task (say a touch screen or a keyboard). We even already have brilliantly functional cloud gaming services (and of course, VOD, like Netflix), so, outside of artificial bandwidth restrictions by ISP's, there's little reason to think that the future has anything to do with increasingly more powerful traditional computers. For some of us who have been in love with technology since our earliest memories, this is a tough sell, but it's hard to argue that's not where we're headed, and perhaps it's just as hard to argue that it's even a bad a thing. I'm sure even the most hardcore among us have tired of the upgrade/incompatibility/instability cycle at some point, if only briefly.

Bill Loguidice's picture

The Humble Indie Bundle #3 (Frozenbyte) - Another Amazing Deal for Windows, Macintosh and Linux Gamers!

Just like we talked about the last two "Humble Bundles", we couldn't help but mention this latest one. Pay what you want for three awesome DRM-free games on Windows, Macintosh, and Linux: Trine, Shadowgrounds: Survivor, and Shadowgrounds. Additionally, your Frozenbyte bundle includes a preorder for Splot and a prototype with source code for Jack Claw. Choose to support the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Child's Play Charity at the same time. Check it out here!

Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: February 27th, 2011

Three for the Road[ FEB . 27 . 2011 ]
 

Three for the Road: 02.27.2011Greetings folks! Welcome to the February 27th, 2011 edition of Three for the Road. This week, I take a look at an eleven year old DOS based BBS door-game which has only recently been released to the public.. albeit, reworked as a single-player or local multi-player ANSImation RPG. We take a look at a minimalistic platforming game with destructible environments which turns out to be much more fun than it first appears. Finally, we take a look at a classic point-and-click style adventure game with a high attention to detail. If you're a fan of classic Sierra or LucasArts adventures then this may be just what you're looking for.
Chip Hageman's picture

Quick Peeks: F-1 Spirit: The way to Formula-1

Quick Peeks[ DEC . 22 . 2010 ]
 
 The Way to Formula-1Way back in the golden age of video games, the humble racing game was nary more then a line on either side of the screen with an amorphous blob in the center to denote your "car". And you know what? It was damn fun to play.

In the ensuing years, the genre pulled itself up by it's proverbial boot straps, dusted itself off and started down the road (pun intended) to refinement... Adding better graphics, physics based handling, simulating realistic weather and track conditions and emulating the driving behavior of famous drivers.

Bill Loguidice's picture

The Humble Indie Bundle #2 - Another Amazing Deal for Windows, Macintosh and Linux Gamers!

Back in May of this year, I talked about the great deal that was The Humble Indie Bundle, where you could name your own price for a collection of great indie games for Windows, Macintosh and Linux, and actually own them free and clear (read: No DRM!). The best part? Proceeds went to the charity of your choice. Now, The Humble Indie Bundle #2 is out, and, luckily, it works the same amazing way, just with a new selection of games: Braid (one of my favorites on the Xbox 360 and a strong case for videogames as art!), Cortex Command, Machinarium, Osmos, and Revenge of the Titans. So, what are you waiting for? Whip out that Paypal, Amazon or Google account and get gaming!

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