commodore

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Matt Barton's picture

Book Review: "Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer" (1993)

Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer, authored by--you guessed it, Stan Veit--is a roughly edited collection of memoirs and editorials Veit wrote during his tenure as editor-in-chief of Computer Shopper. Veit's personal experience with personal computer history is tremendous. He was the first personal computer dealer in New York City, and got to know almost every early luminary in the industry on a first-name basis. He's one part technician (he can talk chips and boards with the best of them), one part salesman, and one part patron. In short, it's hard to find an author better qualified to take us on the journey from the Altair to the IBM PC. However, the book is not without its flaws--it's poorly organized, and the typos make your head hurt.

Bill Loguidice's picture

New Commodore 64-centric Website Offering Modern Hardware and Accessories

It's always good to have many sources for purchasing new Commodore-related projects. While the Amiga has a great resource, here, Marco sends word of a similar Website that focuses mostly on the C-64:

Matt Barton's picture

C-64 Orchestra Releases Trailer

Thanks to Mano for sending us a link to the live trailer for the fabulous Commodore 64 Orchestra (see below!). The idea here is simple--take those great classic tunes from C-64 games and work them up for a "real" orchestra. The Japanese have been doing this for years (decades?) with their NES and SNES tunes, so it's nice to see someone else representing the C-64. This outfit appears to be from the Netherlands (I'm bitterly jealous, Mark!), so if you're in the area check their tour dates.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Protovision Update - Commodore 64 (C64, C-64) (English and German)

Begin Protovision's press release:

(German version below)

COMPETITION PRO JOYSTICK RETURNS

The COMPETITION PRO used to be the best joystick for C64 and Amiga systems. It was well-known for its extreme durability and the characteristic clicking of the microswitches.

Now it returns! Speed-Link and individual Computers re-created the joystick in its classic form. It is compatible with Commodore including C64, Amiga, Atari, Amstrad/Schneider CPC and MSX Systems.

Matt Barton's picture

A Review of Epyx's The Sword of Fargoal (1982)

Jeff McCord's The Sword of Fargoal, released in 1982 for the Commodore VIC 20 and updated in 1983 for the Commodore 64, is one of the most accessible and innovative of the 8-bit computer role playing games. Every serious "Commodork" is familiar with the title, and for good reason. As I see it, there are essentially two qualities that earn this game its venerable status as classic. First, it's a highly accessible game that anyone can learn to play in minutes. Secondly, the creative "fog of war" effect, real-time gameplay, and creepy sound effects generate far more suspense than most other early RPGs. Even in 2006, nearly a quarter century after its release, The Sword of Fargoal still offers compelling and addictive gameplay.

Matt Barton's picture

Mr. Roger's Plays Donkey Kong, Heirloom PC Cases, Best of Sega Master, C-64 Games on the Wii

Mr. Rogers: What, you thought Mr. Rogers wasn't into gaming?Mr. Rogers: What, you thought Mr. Rogers wasn't into gaming?I've been so busy lately that I haven't been able to keep up with my blog reading...And boy, have I missed some cool stuff. Let me run through some of the most interesting posts. First off, from Kotaku comes this snippet of A Mr. Roger's Neighborhood episode featuring Donkey Kong. Fred Rogers reveals himself to be a true hacker, asking not just to play the game but to see inside the box to see how it works. Fun! And, by the way, anyone who thinks Fred Rogers was a pedo is truly sick. Next up, Racketboy runs through the best games for Sega's Master System, starting off with Phantasy Star. Psycho Fox, anyone? Thirdly, buried in this site is an announcement that Epyx will be releasing some of its C-64 titles for the Wii. Sorry, no titles as of yet...!

brn's picture

whoami - A member's musings on his gaming history

"Willy Byte in the Digital Dimension" for the Apple II"Willy Byte in the Digital Dimension" for the Apple III don't know if this'll show up on my profile page, but I felt like writing up a short history of me and gaming. (ed.: I bumped this to the front page of AA)

1978 - Mmm. Coding basic text games on our Apple II+. Plus I could make a cool string of wine goblets run up the side of the screen.

10 PRINT "Y"
20 PRINT "I"
30 GOTO 10

1980 - The folks bring home an Atari 2600. Love blooms. The games I remember most from this time are Pac Man, Space Invaders, Berzerk, Swordquest: Earthworld, and Combat. Like many people I've talked to, you always had to have one friend with an Intellivision and one with a ColecoVision so that everyone could play every system. :)

Bill Loguidice's picture

Commodork: Sordid Tales from a BBS Junkie

Commodork book coverCommodork book coverRob O'Hara's new book, Commodork: Sordid Tales from a BBS Junkie, has recently been restocked and is available again directly from his Website.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Pluto is No Longer a Planet - Commodore Needs to Issue an Update!

Visible Solar System (Commodore, 1982) for the C-64: Screenshot from www.lemon64.comVisible Solar System (Commodore, 1982) for the C-64: Screenshot from www.lemon64.comWell, the final decision has been handed down and Pluto is no longer a planet to the chagrin of many and to the relief of others.

Matt Barton's picture

The 25 Greatest Home Computers--According to PC Magazine

PC World is running an extensive feature called The 25 Greatest PCs of All Time. While I'm a bit skeptical of any such list that doesn't include the Commodore 64 (the list editors seem to think the Commodore Amiga 1000 was a "much better computer"), it nevertheless describes several interesting machines.

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