commodore

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Bill Loguidice's picture

Protovision Update for the Commodore 64 (C-64, C64) - English and German

Advanced Space Battle (C-64): Galaxy ViewAdvanced Space Battle (C-64): Galaxy ViewThe latest updates from Protovision regarding some of the latest and greatest developments in the ongoing world of the Commodore 64 in both English and German follows:

(German version below)

ASB REVIEWS

ADVANCED SPACE BATTLE has been reviewed in the German magazines Cevi-aktuell 6/2006, GO64! 03-05/06 and Digital Talk #79.

Matt Barton's picture

RadioShack and the Origins of PC Gaming

Someone calling himself "DeadDrPhibes" has a great post up at The Older Gamers Paradise called The Birth of PC Gaming. The author takes us on a little tour of the earliest days of home PCs and gaming, starting with furniture-sized monstrosities and ending up with the Apple Mac and the Windows PC. He strikes me as a died-in-the-wall TRS-80 man, and spends good time discussing Radio Shack and Texas Instruments' entries in the home computing market (the CoCo, and so on). It's a fun read, even if it seems to be drafted mostly from the author's own experiences and memories. At any rate, it's nice to see a history like this from this perspective, since most "history-lite" like this I've read has focused mostly on the Apple, Commodore, or IBM. Now all I'm waiting for is a great feature on the Atari line of home computers.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Interview with Tymac - Creators of 8-bit computer hardware, games and utilities in the 1980's

C-64C-64I had posted this back in January 2006 on the original Armchair Arcade and thought it would make sense to re-issue it as a blog post on the new Website for better indexing and future reference.

What follows is the original post from January 2006:

On behalf of Armchair Arcade, I took the opportunity to reach out to the current Tymac (www.tymac.com), since they're based in my neck of the woods. I had heard rumors that they were the same company that produced 8-bit computer hardware, games (talking!) and utilities back in the 1980's and wanted to see if indeed that were true. Today, I got a response back from what will remain for now an unnamed source (though it's easy enough to figure out!), who was around doing great stuff back then and plays an important role at the company now. In the not-too-distant future, I hope to turn this into a full feature for a future issue of Armchair Arcade, expanding on the talk with this gentleman and reviewing some of the games. It should be fun. In the mean-time, enjoy this glimpse...

Bill Loguidice's picture

Historical Thoughts on Computer and Videogame Collecting

Commodore's SuperPET: From the collection of Bill LoguidiceCommodore's SuperPET: From the collection of Bill LoguidiceIt was back on February 7, 2006, that Matt Barton and I collaborated again publicly for the first time since early 2005. Of course we were working together behind the scenes to kick-start Armchair Arcade's rebirth prior to that, but the now defunct Computer Collector Newsletter's 100th issue was where some of the more observant Armchair Arcadian's would first catch a glimpse of what was to come again. In the interest of historical preservation, I present what was eventually published in that newsletter's 100th issue, complete with edits and changes by newsletter editor, Evan Koblentz:

Matt Barton's picture

Scorched Parabolas: A History of the Artillery Game

Author: Matt Barton
Editing: Bill Loguidice
Online Layout: Matt Barton
Special Thanks: Bill Loguidice, Erwin Bierhof, Gavin Camp
All screenshots by the author using various emulators.
Matt Barton's picture

Amiga Voices--Share your Amiga memories!

AmigaAmigaAh, Cloanto. I've never been a big fan of the company, but I have to admit I am impressed with the efforts they're making to serve the Amiga community. Their latest project, Amiga Voices, gives Amigans an opportunity to share their stories with the rest of the world by simply calling one of the many special numbers (including many international ones) and leaving a three-minute message. The best stories will be published on Amiga Forever. However, the deadline is June 30th, so if you want to participate, pick up that phone now!

Matt Barton's picture

Commodore Gaming: Good News or Bad News?

RIP!RIP!Well, it looks like the moldy old corpse of Commodore is being dug up again, but whether to serve good or vile purposes remains to be seen. You can read the details of Commodore's new partnership at Gamasutra and Next-Generation. In a nutshell, we're talking about a five year partnership between Commodore International Corporation and an Amsterdam company called The Content Factory, who plans to use Commodore's branding to help sell a line of new games, mostly intended for mobile devices. In short, I'm not expecting anything really interesting to come from this, other than some cheezy mobile games with Commodore's tarnished logos plastered on them. As someone who grew up with Commodore computers, I really hate to see its image dragged through the dirt, but maybe I'm just being cynical...

Matt Barton's picture

Amiga Workbench in DHTML with Chiptunes

AmigaAmigaThe folks at Chiptune.com have really gone all out with their Amiga-inspired web design. I really like the way they've managed to duplicate the look and feel of the classic Amiga Workbench (version 1.3). They've even got the Guru Meditation error and a working Juggler! The only thing that doesn't seem to work properly is the right mouse button. The site is dedicated to chip tunes, which are a type of computer music that doesn't use digitized sampling. The result is what I consider a more authentic type of music that uses the computer more like a musical instrument than a dubbing or playback device. Have fun!

Bill Loguidice's picture

Expanding the Commodore Amiga 600's Memory

Memory Expansion for the Commodore Amiga 600Memory Expansion for the Commodore Amiga 600It seems all the best new products for Commodore computers come out of Europe these days. It makes sense, as Commodore had a bigger foothold there in the post Commodore 64 era. In any case, one of the latest products is a nifty expansion for the Commodore Amiga 600, a more obscure entry in the Amiga line from a US-perspective, but certainly more common in Europe.

Here's the full release:

Bill Loguidice's picture

Prophet64 SID Music Software System Cartridge Released for the Commodore 64/128

Prophet64 SID Music Software CartridgeProphet64 SID Music Software CartridgeAs readers of Armchair Arcade know (see Matt Barton's "The Rise and Fall of Game Audio"), the Commodore 64 (C-64/128) is a unique sound machine, not out of place itself as an instrument with its powerful SID chip. The Prophet64 has finally been released and it looks to help take the venerable Commodore system to a higher level of audio integration in today's world (click here to see another interesting modern C-64 sound integration option).

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