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Bill Loguidice's picture

Interview with Tymac - Creators of 8-bit computer hardware, games and utilities in the 1980's

C-64C-64I had posted this back in January 2006 on the original Armchair Arcade and thought it would make sense to re-issue it as a blog post on the new Website for better indexing and future reference.

What follows is the original post from January 2006:

On behalf of Armchair Arcade, I took the opportunity to reach out to the current Tymac (www.tymac.com), since they're based in my neck of the woods. I had heard rumors that they were the same company that produced 8-bit computer hardware, games (talking!) and utilities back in the 1980's and wanted to see if indeed that were true. Today, I got a response back from what will remain for now an unnamed source (though it's easy enough to figure out!), who was around doing great stuff back then and plays an important role at the company now. In the not-too-distant future, I hope to turn this into a full feature for a future issue of Armchair Arcade, expanding on the talk with this gentleman and reviewing some of the games. It should be fun. In the mean-time, enjoy this glimpse...

Bill Loguidice's picture

Apple II News and Notes for June 2006


A2 News and Notes June, 2006

INDEX
* Cloning Around
* What's My Spec?
* Old Parts, New Owner
* Software Copyright
* Programming For The Masses
* Understanding Apple
* Online Group Kill
* VGA Support
* Color Our World
* KFest

Bill Loguidice's picture

Retrogaming and Beyond on Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger

Author and Screenshots: Mark J.P. Vergeer
Editing: Cecil Casey, Mathew Tschirgi and Bill Loguidice
Online Layout: Cecil Casey and David Torre

Matt Barton's picture

Apple to buy Nintendo? Yeah, right!

Bandai Pippin: The "WTH" Gaming Rig Bandai Pippin: The "WTH" Gaming Rig
There's some speculation on Cravetalk that Apple is contemplating buying out Nintendo. Preposterous? Perhaps. Everyone who knows something about Nintendo's corporate history knows how many times others (including Microsoft ) have tried this same manuever--and failed miserably. Nintendo has always struck me as a living anachronism--imperial samarai lords thriving in the modern era. The main reason why I think Nintendo made it big in the first place was their unflinching and bold resolve to bring back console gaming to the US, despite all the flack about the "death of the videogames industry" that followed in the wake of the Great Videogame Crash of 1983. A cozy war with Sega followed, but once Sony and then Microsoft entered the fray, Nintendo's been steadily losing market share.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Notable Entertainment Software for US Home Computers, 1976 - 1979 Launch Systems

BETS (1980) for the Commodore PET: While many games for Commodore's PET computer were purely text-based, some, like Randall Lockwood's BETS (1980), seen here via the VICE: PET emulator, implemented comparatively excellent visuals and animationsBETS (1980) for the Commodore PET: While many games for Commodore's PET computer were purely text-based, some, like Randall Lockwood's BETS (1980), seen here via the VICE: PET emulator, implemented comparatively excellent visuals and animationsAs part of the editing process for my upcoming US home videogame and computer entertainment systems history book, I've been logging the software I mention in each section. I thought it might be interesting to list the software I'm mentioning in the book for the 1976 - 1979, computers section, which I just finished going through. Most of these are the cream of the crop or notable titles.

How many of the following are you familiar with?

Bill Loguidice's picture

Apple II News and Notes for May 2006

From A2 News and Notes May, 2006Apple LogoApple Logo:

INDEX
* Old Hardware Made New, Redux
* Hardware-emulated Apple II
* Apple II Internet
* CFFA News
* Moving In Reverse
* Making Music
* VGA Support
* KFest
* Software News
* Emulation News
* SignOff

Bill Loguidice's picture

Apple and Microsoft to Release Portable Game Machines?

How about the gamer iPod?How about the gamer iPod?I've been speculating for some time that the next logical entry into the portable gaming market would be from Apple (particularly in an editorial response to Gamasutra about six months back) and it looks like other industry analysts are starting to catch wind of the idea as well, for instance in this piece from GameDaily BIZ Newsletter, here.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Get Software to Your Apple II simply using Java and a Cable!

Apple //c Cable Connection Photo from Brendan Robert's "Apple Game Server"Apple //c Cable Connection Photo from Brendan Robert's "Apple Game Server"Anyone who has read my past writings knows that I'm a big collector and a huge fan of playing original games (or code) on original hardware. There are countless solutions for various computer and videogame systems for doing this, and one of the systems that has become particularly robust in its offering of late is the Apple II-series of computers. Between compact flash adpaters, disk drive adapters and countless other often manual and complicated transfer methods, it looks like Brendan Robert has created one of the easiest and cheapest systems to date. While I highly recommend both the Apple II compact flash adapter (dreher.net/CFforAppleII/) and the SVD (www.thesvd.com/ - which is particularly good for multi-system collectors), Brendan's solution seems particularly elegant, though I have yet to try it for myself.

Matt Barton's picture

Dead Games and Eternal Emulation

Blade of Blackpool: Nice tavern. You won't find it in Redmond.Blade of Blackpool: Nice tavern. You won't find it in Redmond.Every now and then I read an article that makes me stop and wonder about the Big Picture. What will history students a hundred years from now read, if anything, about my lifetime? Will they "read" at all? An article that did that for me today was The Dead Formats Society by someone named Momus. How is the brief half-life of most digital formats affecting our culture and its future? This is probably a question that all of us here at Armchair Arcade have asked at one time or another, since we're constantly faced with the problem of getting old games for "obsolete" systems to run on our modern hardware.

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