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Mark Vergeer's picture

Experiencing Android 4.4.2 R1 Kitkat (x86) on a core2duo desktop Natively (part 3 on x86 Android)


In this video I demonstrate the Android 4.4 Kitkat x86 release on my HP Compac desktop small form factor PC. It works even better than the Akoya Medion E1222 netbook. Below are the hardware specs of the PC I am using in this demonstration.

Mark Vergeer's picture

Experiencing Android 4.4.2 R1 Kitkat (x86) on an Intel Netbook Natively (part 2 on x86 Android)


In this video I demonstrate the Android 4.4 Kitkat x86 release on my Akoya E1222 netbook (hardware specs below) as Windows 7 Starter Edition wasn't really working smoothly on this machine. I did use Ubuntu on it very successfully but with the new X86 Android release I just had to try it. Check out the video to see how I did.
It supports all my hardware out of the box! And it supports the Google Playstore out of the box!

x86 Android can be found here: http://www.android-x86.org/

Mark Vergeer's picture

Installing Android 4.4.2 R1 Kitkat (x86) on my Intel Netbook Natively (Part 1 on x86 Android)

In this article I install the Android 4.4 Kitkat x86 release on my Akoya M1222 netbook as Windows 7 Starter Edition wasn't really working smoothly on this machine. I did use Ubuntu on it very successfully but with the new X86 Android release I just had to try it. Check out the video to see how I did.
It supports all my hardware out of the box and it fully supports the Google Playstore out of the box! [Read more] below to find out where to obtain x86 Android and information on how to install it.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Is the PC's Reign Ending?

There's an interesting piece by Mercury News Columnist, Troy Wolverton, boldly titled, The PC's reign is ending, where he basically states that this is the beginning of the end of the PC's dominance as our primary computing device. This is the same basic premise as "PC gaming is dying", which we all know is an overblown idea that's been run up the flagpole since the 90's, but, as with that well-worn mantra, I have to agree there's some truth to the concept when it's not taken strictly as a sensationalistic headline. After all, many of us, myself included, have smartphones that perform the majority of functions we used to need powerful desktop or laptop computers for, effectively replacing them in a surprising number of situations.

Luckily, the article is not as superficial as the headline and opening, and does in fact make the point we've made around here time and again, that the reality is a computer by any other name is still a computer. So while it may not be a big gray tower under your desk or a clamshell notebook with a full stroke keyboard in your briefcase, it's really just an evolution of the form factor and more specific functional repurposing (e.g., a smartphone being designed around making calls first, or a videogame console being designed around playing games). The reality is when you factor in things like smartphones and now, tablets, computers are more explosively dominant than ever and will continue on such an upward trajectory until we reach the point of complete saturation and actual disposable computing devices. It's said everything will eventually have a microchip, and really, we're not that far off. I for one welcome our new computing overlords, no matter what shape they take or by what other category we try to place them in.

Bill Loguidice's picture

My new PC gaming laptop

Sager NotebookSager NotebookWell, as many of you know, after a two year+ wait with no ETA in sight, I decided to cancel my Pandora pre-order and put those funds towards the best gaming laptop I could reasonably afford. Now, I know that getting a desktop would be both more powerful and cheaper than getting a laptop, but the reasons why I decided on a gaming laptop rather than a gaming desktop are many. For one, I already bought a quality HP TouchSmart PC desktop not too long ago as my main PC and maxed that out, with the only downside of the system being the on-board video, which I was unable to upgrade, as previously detailed. In other words, it does everything I need a desktop PC to do, save for anything that requires discrete video, like non-casual gaming. Next, my oldest daughter's old HP laptop kicked the bucket, and she is presently without a system. My laptop has been an older Gateway Tablet PC for some time (in fact, it was my main system until it died from heat exhaustion (since repaired) and I replaced it with that HP), which I also maxed out, but it is now too long in the tooth to game (and is missing modern-day niceties like HDMI out). However, it will be a perfect laptop for my daughter, and her being 5 going on 6, I thought it preferable to get myself a new system and hand her down my still perfectly functional Gateway (especially since her 4 year old sister - who will surely also use it - is a terror). In other words, instead of having to get her a cheap laptop (and no, netbooks don't have the required resolution for Web games like Webkinz, ironically), it seemed more logical to spend a bit more on something fitting my needs and do the hand-me-down thing. Next, having something both portable - since I can't ever guarantee I can sit in any one place for any length of time - and with the latest connectivity options, gives all kinds of flexibility that a desktop simply wouldn't offer me (again, HDMI out in conjunction with HDTV will prove very useful). Finally, since I need to give my Gateway laptop to my daughter anyway, I'd prefer not to be without a portable workstation, since you never know when such a thing can come in handy (I suppose my work Thinkpad laptop might have been an option in a pinch, but it's preferable not to mix too much personal with business).

After a considerable amount of research and shopping around, including with Alienware and budget brands like Asus, I found that by far the best deals were with Sager, whose laptops hands-down have the best gaming-centric options for the best price. Depending upon model and whatever incentives they happen to be offering, you can get anywhere from 1.5x to 2x the bang for the buck that you can anywhere else (Sager notebooks are available direct and also from a variety of resellers). So, with budget, feature-set and overall bang-for-the-buck taken into consideration, I settled on the Sager NP8760-S1. The specs are pretty good:

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