innovation

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Chris Kennedy's picture

Chris's Podcast #2: Videogames are Dead. Command?

My second podcast has arrived, and it is heavier on the theory than the controversy - at least I hope.

In this podcast, I submit that gaming - specifically the creativity behind it - is dead. This is certainly not a new idea - but I attempt to explain where we have been and look back at what made us successful. Where are we going? That's up to us.

Expect a look at the past, a bit of gaming philosophy, and a short, semi-technical story.

I look forward to your feedback.

Download the mp3.

Matt Barton's picture

The Top Ten Greatest Innovations in CRPGs

When you got 300 shortswords.No copper breastplate left behind.This week, I'm looking at what I consider the ten best innovations in CRPGs. That means, I'm looking at games that introduced new gameplay elements or at least adapted existing concepts, forging something that has become (or should have become) important, influential, or at least pretty damn awesome. Keep in mind that the game as a whole might be weak or even a flop; that isn't relevant here. What is relevant is which games introduced which concepts and when. So, let's get started with #10:

10. The mule in Dungeon Siege. Year: 2002. Concept: A pack animal to help carry your lootz. I don't remember much about the original Dungeon Siege game, but I will never forget that crusty pack animal. I'm pretty sure the thinking behind the mule was simply utilitarian; "Hey, that'd be handy to have around." But in one stroke the designers made a game ten times more memorable and self-parodying. And how many times did a battle hinge on the kicking of your mule? Mules literally kick ass. Wait, is that possible? Now I'm so spoiled that I always want a pack of them in assorted colors--what, I'm supposed to just leave that solid gold Elminster statue behind?

Matt Barton's picture

Chris Crawford on Why Modern Games Suck

Sam and Max 2: Cancelled due to it's not being an FPS.Sam and Max 2: Cancelled due to it's not being an FPS.Chris Crawford is raising hackles by decrying the lack of innovation in modern games: The creative life has gone out of the industry. And an industry that has no creative spark to it is just marking time to die. It's a story near and dear to us retrogaming enthusiasts (and how many rants has Shane R. Monroe offered us on this topic?) This story ties in very nicely with The Best Games Never Published--a must-read for everyone here at Armchair Arcade! What are your thoughts? Do you agree with Crawford, or is he just not looking in the right places? After all, this kid seems quite happy with his new console...

Bill Loguidice's picture

Brief Thoughts on Innovation in Videogames through Meteor Blaster DX Signature Edition

After having purchased Meteor Blaster DX Signature Edition for the NEC Turbo Duo/PC Engine (it's in Super CD format) many months back, I was presented with the opportunity to review it for an upcoming issue of Video Game Collector magazine. Of course, me being me, I volunteered to both review the product, provide photos and interview the author, who was quite agreeable.

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