pc

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Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: December 26th, 2010.

Three for the Road[ DEC . 26 . 2010 ]
 
This week I bring you three great classic game remakes for the PC. First up is the classic Commodore 64/Spectrum shoot'em up/platformer Exolon. Secondly, the very odd Pickford Bro's platformer Zub. Lastly, a remake of the old Commodore 64 shooter Falcon Patrol.

Read more here.

Chip Hageman's picture

Quick Peeks: F-1 Spirit: The way to Formula-1

Quick Peeks[ DEC . 22 . 2010 ]
 
 The Way to Formula-1Way back in the golden age of video games, the humble racing game was nary more then a line on either side of the screen with an amorphous blob in the center to denote your "car". And you know what? It was damn fun to play.

In the ensuing years, the genre pulled itself up by it's proverbial boot straps, dusted itself off and started down the road (pun intended) to refinement... Adding better graphics, physics based handling, simulating realistic weather and track conditions and emulating the driving behavior of famous drivers.

Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: December 19th, 2010.

Three for the Road[ DEC . 19 . 2010 ]
 
This week we have three more indie games for you to check out. An insane ball and paddle game, an on-rails shooter and a "Collect'em Up".

Read more here.

Chip Hageman's picture

Quick Peeks: Robotz DX

Quick Peeks[ DEC . 15 . 2010 ]
 
Robotz DXToday we are going to take a look at a remake of the Atari ST classic; Robotz. While not being a 1:1 port of the original game, it does a fine job of translating what made the original so much fun to play.

In fact, the game actually plays a bit faster and has more of a frantic pace than the original.. which is fine in my book.

Click here to read more..

Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: December 12th, 2010.

Three for the Road[ DEC . 12 . 2010 ]
 
Greetings folks. This Sunday I've got a great selection of titles for you to check out. We will take a look at Stu and Smila's new retro Commodore 64 style platform game, Kot-in-Action's new episodic top-down shoot'em-up and Uglysoft's new off-the-wall take on J-RPG's.

This is not one to be missed, so stop on by.

Chip Hageman's picture

Crystal Hammer PC version found.

A while back I showcased a fun Arkanoid clone by the name of Crystal Hammer by reLINE software for the Commodore Amiga.

I had read that this game was released for platforms other than the Amiga, but I had never come across any in my travels. Well.. official ports of the game, that is- There are a few rather bad indie versions of the game available on the PC which I won't go into.

Yesterday, I was perusing one of my favorite classic gaming torrent communities and came across a European release of Crystal Hammer for the PC. I'm guessing that this was an EU exclusive release since I've never come across it in the states.

Matt Barton's picture

More on the PC/Console Divide

Edge Magazine is running a nice article responding to Crytek's Cevat Yerli's rant on PC vs. consoles that we discussed previously. It brings up some good questions, such as whether PCs will step up their invasion of the living room and the effect that might have on the divide: Surely, though, if you were to click a button and magically beam your PC output to your TV today, you’d still be pretty far from a console-like experience. Neither Microsoft nor Steam has shown any real interest in a living-room game UI, even though it’s entirely feasible. In the end, believes Ployhar, the choice might be made for them.

Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: Chromatron, Cobex, 7th Swarming of the Machines

Three for the Road
>> Dec. 5th, 2010: Chromatron, COBEX: Cruising on Broadway Extra, 7th Swarming of the Machines.

Welcome back to Three for the Road. This week we have another line up of quality indie titles for you to check out. One puzzle game which is reminiscent of one of my favorite Commodore 64 puzzlers, One maze game with it's roots entrenched in two of classic gamings greatest titles, and one experimental platformer that shows the industry what kind of fun can be had when you start breaking all the rules.

Check it all out here!

Chip Hageman's picture

Quick Peeks: Space Chunks II: Lair of the Chunk Lords [BETA]

Quick Peeks
·  · ·· Quick Peeks: Space Chunks 2 ·· ·  ·

Welcome to another Quick Peeks.. This week I'm taking a look at a free form arena shooter created by George Thornton. This game has it all: Great graphics, weapon upgrades, power-ups, enemies, boss battles, wingmen, commendations, promotions and much more.

Drop in an see what all of the fuss is about.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Crytek: "PC 'a generation ahead' of PS3 and 360, but being held back"

Website CVG is reporting that Crytek boss Cevat Yerli has claimed that developers' focus on PS3 and 360 is holding back game quality on PC--a format he believes is already "a generation ahead" of modern day consoles. I say, "too bad, Yerli, it's good for us gamers!". I've been pining for a reasonably stable PC spec to stop the technological arms race since the days of the 486 PC, but it's never happened. Ever since more recent times when the PC has had to take a back seat in software sales to consoles, it's been the console hardware that's been dictating what kind of big budget software has appeared on PC's (outside of a few high profile exceptions from the likes of companies like Blizzard). Why do I consider such a scenario a win? Simply because we NEED periods of 5+ years or so of stability in order for software developers to catch up to the hardware and start to butt up against the limits of what is possible. If the hardware remains a moving target, then there's less chance for normal coding challenges to be minimized, which leads to more opportunities for innovation since more focus can be placed on design rather than wrestling with the technology. With budgets already in the millions of dollars and team sizes in the hundreds, access to more power is obviously not the answer to the call for better games. Despite what some would like us to believe, there is no noticeable (i.e., real world, not benchmarks) technological divide between high end PC's and the PS3 or Xbox 360 outputting 1080p. Modest platforms like the iPhone and Nintendo DS have already long since proven that it's not necessarily power that succeeds, it's clever design. With that said, no matter what side of the debate you're on, I'd think it's hard to argue with how pleasant the idea is that the hardware we have in our possession now should be able to play the latest games for at least a few more years before requiring an upgrade, right?

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