ms-dos

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Games or software related to the MS-DOS platform.
Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark Plays... Champ Games (MS-DOS/PC)

ChampGames / Champrogramming / Champ programming was a game developer from the US founded by John W. Champeau. Robert Cole was in charge of sound design. They produced quite a few wonderful ports of classic arcade games around 1996/1997 running on MS-DOS & Windows95 PCs.

(Read more below)

Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark Plays... Boulderdash (IBM-PC/MS-DOS)(CGA)(1984)


Boulderdash by First Star Software originated on the Atari-8-bit computer line, hopped over to the C64 and was actually released on a whole myriad of other platforms including the old IBM-PC. It came on 5.25" floppy disks and it is a selfbooting disk - with a modified version of MS-DOS on it that directly boots into the game.

Check out the game and see how I play until the first game over.

Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark Plays... Centipede (IBM-PC/MS-DOS)(CGA)(1983)


Centipede on the IBM PC programmed by R.J.Grafe in 1983. It's not the official port by Atarisoft but another release sporting quite an innovative control scheme. It actually features a simulation of the trackball found on the original arcade game. It uses the space bar for firing and the cursor keys to move around the little gun-turret. Pressing a directional key is similar to giving the trackball a swirl. Pressing multiple times in rapid succesion is like giving the trackball more momentum. A bit of an indirect control scheme but it really works well. With this control scheme in place this actually makes for an excellent port.

Take a look at the video and see how I fared.

Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark plays... Screamer (PC MS-DOS)


Screamer is an old MS-DOS game originally released in 1995. Created by Graffiti and published by Virgin. It's also available on GOG.com in both Mac and Windows flavours. A game very similar in looks to a mix of both Daytona USA as well as Ridge Racer. A direct competitor of this game was EA's Need for Speed which I was also a big fan of. This game even features licensed cars from various well known car manufacturers. A cool game even after all this time.

Go check out how I did. It had been ages since I last played it. And it shows ;)

Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark Plays... Tubular Worlds (PC / MS-DOS / Amiga / 1994)


I was going to play the Amiga game but that kept on crashing on me so I chose to do the PC version instead which is very similar if not identical.
A great R-type/Nemesis/Gradius like shoot'm up for PC and Amiga systems. Very nice smooth scrolling and a wonderful use of the 256 colours of the VGA palette. It spreads around 4 levels (worlds), has a nice weapons upgrade system comparable to that of Konami and Compile shooters. Nice soundtrack and great sound FX using the wonderful Sounblaster and FM synthesis. A two player mode is optional but I was unable to show you that as I didn't have a second player available to me. The game is controlled through either mouse, joystick or keyboard

Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark Plays... Silpheed (PC / MS-DOS)

Silpheed is the name of the ship you fly in this 1988 game released on MS-DOS, it was originally developed on the PC8801 & FM-7 computer systems and later ported to MS-DOS, Apple II and the Tandy Coco (!!!). I originally encountered this game first on the SegaCD/MegaCD but that was a remake of the original shown here.

A great sequel called Silpheed: The Lost Planet came out for the PlayStation 2 and I just happen to own that game as well so another video with that will probably pop-up eventually.

There's also a Silpheed game on the xbox 360 which is called ' Project Sylpheed' .

Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark plays... Zaxxon (Arcade)

A link to a great comparison video by http://www.youtube.com/user/GamingHistorySource
http://youtu.be/a9FDaHxVrCE

Zaxxon, I believe this is one of the first isometric arcade games out there. It was developed and published by Sega in 1982 and one could call it a so called 'isometric shoot'm up'.

Many ports were created on various platforms like: Apple II, Atari 8bit home computers, MS-DOS (CGA), Atari 2600, MSX, Commodore 64, Dragon32, Colecovision, Intellivision, Sega SG-1000, TRS 80 Coco.

The 2600 and Intellivision versions didn't use the isometric viewpoint and are much unlike the others.

The Amstrad CPC, BBC micro computer and Ti/99 reveived well done but unliscensed ports.

Soundtrack intro created by
http://www.youtube.com/user/ZombieAndy1979

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Bill Loguidice's picture

Casual Photos: Computer Preparation for the SAT (IBM PC and IBM PCjr, 1983)

Today's casual photos - by request - and taken with a Canon digital camera, is from the Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Computer Test Preperation Series, Computer Preparation for the SAT, for the IBM PC and PCjr, from 1983. Its 1983 release date ranks it among the earliest releases indicated being specifically for the PCjr. While I haven't tested this product myself and may never get around to it, the fact that it's a non-intensive text-based program leads me to believe that not only should it work on standard PC compatibles running MS-DOS, but also most MS-DOS compatibles. The difference? Basically true PC compatibles were both BIOS and Microsoft DOS compatible with the original IBM PC (Compaq was one of the first to pull this feat off), while MS-DOS compatibles were not BIOS compatible, but ran their own version of Microsoft DOS (popular MS-DOS-only systems included the TI Professional, the Tandy 2000 and the Otrona Atache' 8:16). While this often meant a degree of file compatibility (and theoretically easy software ports for willing developers/publishers), any software that made specific calls to specific locations would typically fail. Luckily MS-DOS-only compatible systems gave way to 100% or near 100% compatibles by the mid-80's, for obvious reasons, as why support a dozen niche MS-DOS-only compatible systems that each required their own version of your software, when you could just write to the "PC Compatible" spec, holding the original IBM PC as the gold standard (Lotus 1-2-3 and Microsoft's Flight Simulator were often the best tests of true compatibility--if your system could run those with little to no issues, you were good to go).

Matt Barton's picture

Lure of the Temptress

Lure of the Tempress: Screenshot from the first part of Lure of the Temptress, dialogue screen.Lure of the Tempress: Screenshot from the first part of Lure of the Temptress, dialogue screen.

Lure of the Temptress was the debut of a new British GAG developer called Revolution Software. The game appeared in 1992, the same year Lucas Arts released its classic Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis, and two years after The Secret of Monkey Island and Loom. Around the same time, Sierra was releasing the fifth installment of King's Quest. In short, Lure was part of what we might call the early "Golden Age" of GAGs, when a few major companies were putting out very innovative work--but when a smaller company like Revolution (or Cyberdreams with their Darkseed game) was still able to make their presence felt with an innovative title. Lure was (and remains) a popular title for the Amiga platform, and even the DOS version I played had an Amiga-like quality to the graphics.

Lure's big gimmick is an engine called "Virtual Theater." Revolution describes this innovation on their website:

Matt Barton's picture

Simon the Sorcerer

Simon the Sorcerer is one of those games that has been on my backlist for quite some time.

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