iphone

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Mark Vergeer's picture

Vectrex Regeneration (iOS) - a non-scripted first look

Freshly released Vectrex Emulator running on iOS available in the app store. The app itself is free but actual games are available in a pack and that is about 5-6 Euros. The app is available world wide. Sadly no word of an Android version of the app which should be very possible as the Android and iPad hardware really aren't that different and Android tablets should be able to manage something like this well. Read more below...

Bill Loguidice's picture

Why I canceled my PlayStation Vita pre-order

Well, I did it, I canceled my $359.96 pre-order of the Sony PlayStation Vita - WiFi, ModNation Racers: Road trip, Uncharted: Golden Abyss, and Hot Shots Golf on Amazon. It's not because it was too much money - it was - but I planned for it. It's not that I don't want it either - I do - but it simply doesn't make sense at this time. I have long gone on record - much to the chagrin of the Nintendo faithful - that I believe this is the last generational hurrah for dedicated gaming handhelds. In short, I believe they will still sell well this generation, just not anywhere near the heights of the last generation when the DS and PSP ruled the roost. I've given many reasons for this line of thinking, but I primarily chalk it up to smartphones and tablets being good enough as game machines and the inclination for most people to carry as few electronic devices as possible. In other words, would you rather have a device that does everything multimedia and Internet effortlessly (and, as a smartphone, makes phone calls and texts), and has inexpensive apps (and a great camera for stills and video, etc.), as well as plays good games, or would you rather have a device that plays really good games (thanks mostly to onboard physical controls), but is mediocre (or incapable) at everything else and has expensive apps? Some of us will have both, but many of us will only choose the most logical of the two. If you look at the issue without the emotion of a dedicated gamer, there really is no good argument for having anything other than a smartphone and maybe a tablet in your portable arsenal, particularly since the former has an excuse to be with you 100% of the time.

Mark Vergeer's picture

Mark builds his Mame Arcade Cabinet (sort of)

I finally built my long awaited Mame Cabinet - sort of

I got an iCade because I was able to download iMame from iTunes when it was up there momentarily just before it was pulled from the service. It is possible to add more games to it and it allows your iPhone, iPod or iPad to function as a Mame tablet. Combine it with the iCade and you can turn it into a cheap Mame Cabinet. I am thinking about doing a proper sit down mame cab sometime in the future though but this will suffice for now.

Now I own the white rimmed iPad2 - they were fresh out of black ones when I went to go get one and I think the black rimmed iPad2 would look even better in this iCade cab. :P

If you have jailbroken your device it is possible to download the Mame4All package and run that instead. Mind you the iPad 2 still is not possible to be jailbroken. I have an iPad2 and an iPhone4 and both work great with this iCade cabinet. It is also possible to use this blue tooth arcade stick with Android tablets running a version of Mame compatible with this too :P
so it is not iOS only!
http://code.google.com/p/imame4all/

Soundtrack leader by ZombieAndy1979 aka Synthmonkey
http://www.youtube.com/user/ZombieAndy1979

Bill Loguidice's picture

E3 2011 Viewpoints: Apple iOS and Macintosh at WDC

OK, it's actually the Worldwide Developers Conference (WDC), rather than E3, but the timing is the same and I like to keep the headers consistent, so kindly deal with it. After starting off with Microsoft and Sony, it's now Apple's turn (leaving only the elephant in the room to cover, Nintendo). Here goes:

  • I'm honestly not that interested in Mac stuff, but of the many updates via the upcoming OS X Lion, I most appreciate the fact that apps will finally be able to go full-screen. I always found the lack of that feature bizarre. The updates still won't get me off of the Windows standard, but at least Apple can still sometimes admit when they're wrong with interfaces.

Now, for the big iOS stuff (On a side note, I think all but one of the AA staff has iPhones at this point, and at least three of us have iPads, so, while Apple's mojo hasn't worked on us from the MacOS side of things, it sure has on the iOS side.):

Matt Barton's picture

Review of Shadow Ranch (Nancy Drew Mobile Mysteries)

Everybody here knows how much I love Her Interactive's Nancy Drew series. These are great adventure games with fun characters and charming atmosphere. Her Interactive has recently expanded its offerings to Apple's mobile line, starting with a game called Shadow Ranch, currently $2 for iPhone/iPod and $5 for iPad, which is in HD (holy cow, I'm jealous). I recently completed the game on my iPhone 4, and am pleased to say it's a fun game that's quite distinctive from its desktop predecessor. I don't think Her Interactive (HI) has really tapped the full potential of the platform, but it's definitely a step in the right direction.

Matt Barton's picture

Matt Chat 94: Cordes on adventure games, horror, game narratives, the Ipad, and more

This week, Cordes is back with several fascinating insights into the world of adventure games and horror. We talk about the difference between horror films and horror games, storytelling, why adventure games should be sorted by their plot and not as a gameplay genre, and much more. There's quite a bit of meat here for anyone interested in designing an adventure game or wondering how they work. Download the audio here.

Matt Barton's picture

"The Jackals" are Back--On your iPhone

One of Nolan Bushnell's favorite diatribes is about the people he calls "jackals," those scrupulous copycats that, in his view, ripped off his ideas time and time again. Despite the fact that some accuse him of doing the same thing to Ralph Baer (especially Mr. Baer), it's hard not to sympathize with hard-working creators who see their profits annihilated by shameless clones and rip-offs. There's a nice example of it at Ars Technica, which documents a flagrant "The Blocks Cometh" knock-off (including art and name!) on the iPhone. According to the article, victims have few options other than to hire lawyers, which as well all know is well beyond the means of most indies.

I'm not sure what the remedy is here, though. The other extreme would be just as bad, with existing owners claiming that even the remotest derivative was a clone. What exactly is the line between a derivative and a clone, though?

Matt Barton's picture

Make Simple Game for iPhone; Proceed Directly to Bank

TrainyardTrainyardGamasutra has an interview up with one Matt Rix, designer and developer of a simple iOS game called Trainyard. Although he did all the work during his work commute, the game has already netted him enough cash to quit his day job and found his own game company. I love what he says here: "I’ve learned a ton of lessons, but the biggest one is to pick a goal then follow through till you’re done. You’ve got to be motivated and determined to finish your game, or else you just won’t. I see way too many people biting off more than they can chew, attacking huge games or just working on prototype after prototype ad nauseum. I think you’ll learn way more from finishing and releasing a single game than you’ll ever learn from working on dozens of prototypes." Touche!

Bill Loguidice's picture

A Very Brief Overview of what I've Been Playing for the Past Few Days

Since I've had a chance to actually play some games on platforms like the PC, Xbox 360, Wii, iPhone, and PS3 lately, I thought I would share some quick thoughts. After reading, why don't you share some of your own thoughts on those games or some of what you're playing?

Matt Barton's picture

Molyneux: Enjoy Indie iPhone Games While They Last

An online magazine called Develop has published an interview with Peter Molyneux. One of the more interesting pronouncements concerns the iPhone, where Molyneux predicts Triple-A games will eventually replace all the low-budget indie games currently raging on the device:

They will nibble away at the market. My advice for anyone doing iPhone games is to be original, think about the things the big companies won’t try.

What do you think? Is the current explosion of creativity witnessed on the iPhone and iPad soon to give way to insipid licensed-titles by the big boys?

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