Miscellaneous

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A catch-all for anything not covered elsewhere...
Bill Loguidice's picture

Help us with Discussions with the Most Fascinating People in Videogame History - Who do you want to read about?

There's a potential project that's a bit too early for Matt and me to talk about in detail that I thought would be worthwhile to seek everyone's help with, since many of you were so helpful with the Vintage Games book. Who do you think are the most fascinating people in videogame history? There are some obvious ones, like Ralph Baer, Richard Garriott, Roberta Williams, Bill Budge, Chuck Peddle, etc., and I've already come up with a list of roughly 23, but it really needs to be fleshed out (and Matt still needs to take a crack at adding to it). The goal is to get as many names as possible. The only criteria is that they must be living, live in North America or be readily available via e-mail (or Skype) if elsewhere, and probably speak English reasonably well. They might have helped create a great computer or videogame console or some component thereof, they might be great programmers, they might be great tools or middleware developers, etc. Any fascinating person in our industry's history. Who do you want to read about? Let us know as soon as you can as it would be a huge help. There's no reason to share the current list, as it would be helpful to validate some of the names I/we've already come up with independently. Thanks everyone!

Bill Loguidice's picture

Rambling Thoughts on Writing, Methodologies and Techniques with Tips - Mine and Yours

I'd love to hear others' opinions and thoughts on this topic, so I may as well lay my own out first. Matt had sent me an interesting link yesterday about Steven Johnson's writing techniques and mention of his recent use of DEVONthink, which is listed as a "Personal Information Assistant", and is essentially a database for copying and pasting all kinds of info in an organized manner for later access, and is particularly useful for those writing books or research intensive articles or papers. Always intrigued by such things, I checked it out, but alas it's only for the Mac platform so it's not something that's viable for me at the moment since I use those as secondary, not primary systems (which are still all Windows XP- and Vista-based). This got me reflecting on my own ever evolving writing style and idea/reference storage techniques over the years.

Bill Loguidice's picture

A small bit of unusual Atari ST/Commodore Amiga history regarding 3.5" disks

Remember back in the late 1970s and early 1980s when games used to come on cassette, publishers such as Avalon Hill would pack on as many as a half dozen or more different platform versions of one game onto the front and back of one cassette? And how in the age of the 5.25" disk, the front and back of a disk were sometimes sold with, for instance, an Atari 8-bit version on one side and a Commodore 64 version on another? This became a lost art with the rise of the 3.5" disk, as there was only one side and no way to split formats; it wouldn't be until optical media rose to prominence that we would again see multiple platforms on one disc (usually Windows and Mac). Or was it a lost art on 3.5" disk? I was unaware until about a year or so ago that multiple platforms on a 3.5" was not only possible, but was actually used in a commercial product by at least one company, Rainbird, who developed a seemingly impossible dual format Atari ST/Commodore Amiga disk for their game, Starglider II. As luck would have it, I recently won a dual format Starglider II to go along with the standard, single platform releases I already have in the series. Of course, according to its Wikipedia entry, releasing Starglider II in this format made the game extremely unreliable so the technique was abandoned, but it's still of significant historical interest as far as I'm concerned. Perhaps some time after it comes I'll attempt to load it on each of the systems and see what happens!

Bill Loguidice's picture

Bonus Images for Vintage Games Book: Web Chapter - Tony Hawk's Pro Skater (1999)

Vintage Games: An Insider Look at the History of Grand Theft Auto, Super Mario, and the Most Influential Games of All Time (2009), by Bill Loguidice and Matt Barton, thro

Bill Loguidice's picture

Bonus Images for Vintage Games Book: Web Chapter - Star Raiders (1979)

Vintage Games: An Insider Look at the History of Grand Theft Auto, Super Mario, and the Most Influential Games of All Time (2009), by Bill Loguidice and Matt Barton, thro

Bill Loguidice's picture

Bonus Images for Vintage Games Book: Web Chapter - Spacewar! (1962)

Vintage Games: An Insider Look at the History of Grand Theft Auto, Super Mario, and the Most Influential Games of All Time (2009), by Bill Loguidice and Matt Barton, thro

Bill Loguidice's picture

Bonus Images for Vintage Games Book: Web Chapter - Rogue (1980)

Vintage Games: An Insider Look at the History of Grand Theft Auto, Super Mario, and the Most Influential Games of All Time (2009), by Bill Loguidice and Matt Barton, thro

Bill Loguidice's picture

Bonus Images for Vintage Games Book: Web Chapter - Robotron: 2084 (1982)

Vintage Games: An Insider Look at the History of Grand Theft Auto, Super Mario, and the Most Influential Games of All Time (2009), by Bill Loguidice and Matt Barton, thro

Bill Loguidice's picture

Bonus Images for Vintage Games Book: Web Chapter - Pinball Construction Set (1982)

Vintage Games: An Insider Look at the History of Grand Theft Auto, Super Mario, and the Most Influential Games of All Time (2009), by Bill Loguidice and Matt Barton, thro

Bill Loguidice's picture

Bonus Images for Vintage Games Book: Web Chapter - Elite (1984)

Vintage Games: An Insider Look at the History of Grand Theft Auto, Super Mario, and the Most Influential Games of All Time (2009), by Bill Loguidice and Matt Barton, thro

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