atari

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Related to Atari game consoles, games, or computers.
Matt Barton's picture

Where are they now? A Look at 5 defunct game superpowers.

Eric-Jon Rössel Waugh of Next Generation has another excellent feature out, this time about five legendary game companies that bit the dust--or, as Waugh puts it, a tribute to "five fallen icons of the videogame industry." In case you're wondering, the icons in question are Atari, Origin, Sierra On-Line, Black Isle Studios, and Looking Glass Studios. All of these companies made outstanding games, and I'm sure you'll enjoy reading about their rise and fall--and contemplating how things would look now if these companies were still with us. He ends the piece on a powerful and insightful note:

Matt Barton's picture

A History of Stupid Superman Games

Superman's Buns of SteelSuperman's Buns of SteelIn honor of the newly released movie, 1up has a very colorful feature up called Gamer's Kryptonite: Superman's 10 Worst Games. The article starts with Superman for the Atari 2600 and covers titles from many computers, consoles, and arcade machines. It's really curious how easy it is to take a big budget and really make a cringe-worthy game based on a mega-popular franchise. I mean, how hard can it be to get a Superman game right? I distinctly remember playing Superman: Man of Steel on my Amiga and thinking how lousy it was. Then again, Superman's powers don't necessarily lend themselves very well to a videogame--he's simply too powerful. It's hard to translate his powers into compelling gameplay. About the only challenge left would be strategic ones--assuming Superman can only be in one place at the same time (an assertion challenged in the movies). Should you save a bus from going over a bridge or Lois Lane from an earthquake?

Bill Loguidice's picture

Cool Classic Game Watches

Fossil Atari Centipede Animation WatchFossil Atari Centipede Animation WatchThe last "fun" watch I got, save for a relatively recent MP3/WMA/Voice Recorder/FM Radio/512MB Storage/USB watch, was a Nintendo Tetris watch, which I believe I got around 1998. I just found out about this new watch from Fossil, based around Atari's Centipede (and here are the others). Unfortunately, unlike the classic watches of old - like the ones from the early 80's based around Pac-Man and Space Invaders - you can't actually play this one. That and the high price make this a bit of a dissapointment, despite being well designed and in color. I'll take a classic 70's/80's computer, red LED or playable game watch any day over this, though if I ever saw it cheap enough...

Bill Loguidice's picture

Raid Over the River - Nintendo DS

Raid Over the River for the Nintendo DS (Nibris, 2006)Raid Over the River for the Nintendo DS (Nibris, 2006)Though it looks like it makes unusual use of the bottom screen and may have a little too much detail in its visuals, fans of top-down console shooters going all the way back to Carol Shaw's legendary River Raid for the Atari 2600 VCS should keep an eye on Nibris's upcoming Nintendo DS game, Raid Over the River.

Here's the official press release from the Polish developer (note, the Nibris Website appears to be down at the moment):

Bill Loguidice's picture

A-VCS-tec Challenge Released for the Atari 2600 VCS

Screenshot from A-VCS-tec Challenge (Atari 2600 VCS)Screenshot from A-VCS-tec Challenge (Atari 2600 VCS)The Atari 2600 Video Computer System (VCS) homebrew author of Mental Kombat, Simon Quernhorst, has just released A-VCS-tec Challenge, a conversion of Paul Norman's (of Cosmi and Forbidden Forest fame) classic Aztec Challenge for the Commodore 64 (C-64). A-VCS-tec Challenge features an updated modification of the first two levels from the original Norman game and music by the talented Paul Slocum, who really knows how to push the Atari 2600's sound hardware.

Sadly, the 50 copy run of the limited boxed edition with tons of extras is a bit out of my price range (thank you, Euro conversion rates!), but if you're interested, ordering begins promptly on July 1st. I guess I'll be looking out for regular editions available from US sellers. In any case, read all about the fascinating details here.

Bill Loguidice's picture

New Atari 2600 VCS and Coleco ColecoVision Homebrew Cartridges Now Available!

Atari 2600 VCS and ColecoVision Homebrew Games: Atari 2600 VCS>> AStar, Conquest of Mars, Rainbow Invaders, Wolfenstein VCS: The Next Mission * Coleco ColecoVision>> Cosmo Fighter 2, Cosmo Fighter 3Atari 2600 VCS and ColecoVision Homebrew Games: Atari 2600 VCS>> AStar, Conquest of Mars, Rainbow Invaders, Wolfenstein VCS: The Next Mission * Coleco ColecoVision>> Cosmo Fighter 2, Cosmo Fighter 3 Ah, there's nothing I like more than great new games for truly classic systems like the Atari 2600 VCS and Coleco ColecoVision. Atari 2600: "AStar" is a puzzle game from the same guy who did the superb "Fall Down"; "Conquest of Mars" is a translation of "Caverns of Mars" originally on the Atari 8-bit computer systems; "Rainbow Invaders" is a fresh update of the "Space Invaders" concept; and "Wolfenstein VCS: The Next Mission" appears to be a take off on the "Venture" concept. ColecoVision: "Cosmo Fighter 2" and "Cosmo Fighter 3" are re-releases of some of the earliest homebrew titles for the system. I can't wait to check these out further!

Matt Barton's picture

Songbird Productions: An Interview with Carl Forhan

Author and Interviewer: Bill Loguidice
Editing: Matt Barton
Online Layout: Bill Loguidice
Special Thanks and Notes: Carl Forhan for being the subject of the feature and providing use of the images
Also see: Songbird Productions (About), Jagu-Dome Interview, Tomorrow's Heroes Interview, Good Deal Games Interview, Alive 4 – LynxUK Interview and MyAtari Interview
Bill Loguidice's picture

Good Deal Games: An Interview with Michael Thomasson

Author and Interviewer: Bill Loguidice
Editing: Matt Barton
Online Layout: Bill Loguidice
Special Thanks and Notes: Michael Thomasson for being the subject of the feature and providing use of the images
Also see: Good Deal Games (Staff), Game Informer Magazine Interview by Matt Helgeson, Planet Dreamcast Interview by BenT and Totally Retro by Jim Lenhan
Bill Loguidice's picture

Notable Entertainment Software for US Home Computers, 1976 - 1979 Launch Systems

BETS (1980) for the Commodore PET: While many games for Commodore's PET computer were purely text-based, some, like Randall Lockwood's BETS (1980), seen here via the VICE: PET emulator, implemented comparatively excellent visuals and animationsBETS (1980) for the Commodore PET: While many games for Commodore's PET computer were purely text-based, some, like Randall Lockwood's BETS (1980), seen here via the VICE: PET emulator, implemented comparatively excellent visuals and animationsAs part of the editing process for my upcoming US home videogame and computer entertainment systems history book, I've been logging the software I mention in each section. I thought it might be interesting to list the software I'm mentioning in the book for the 1976 - 1979, computers section, which I just finished going through. Most of these are the cream of the crop or notable titles.

How many of the following are you familiar with?

Matt Barton's picture

Atari 800/130/5200 Emulation for your PSP!

PSPPSPIf anyone has an extra Sony PSP sitting around, please consider shipping it to me! Everytime I turn around there's something like this Atari 800/5200 emulator out for it. How cool would it be to play the original M.U.L.E. on your PSP? By the way, if anyone tries out this emulator, let us know your thoughts!

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