atari

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Related to Atari game consoles, games, or computers.
Bill Loguidice's picture

2006 AtariAge Holiday Sale and Toyshop Trouble Cart Giveaway!

Our friends over at AtariAge have incredible online store deals for the Atari VCS 2600 and Atari 7800 Pro System going on now. Check out the new homebrew stuff! Information below:

Matt Barton's picture

Review: Electronic Arts' "M.U.L.E." (1983)

Dani Bunten's multiplayer trading game, M.U.L.E., is the best family-friendly multiplayer computer game ever designed.

Matt Barton's picture

What can your Atari 800 do for you?

What can your Atari 800 do for you? Well, according to this You Tube video of an Atari 800 in-store demo (see below), mostly business and professional applications (yeah, right). It's almost sad to see Atari working so hard in this demo to impress the very people who dismissed Atari as nothing more than a maker of game consoles. Both Atari and Commodore shunned the "game machine" label, even though the most loyal fans of both systems probably played more games than any other type of software (though I'm sure any of these fans would be quick to defend these machines as "real computers.") Although the demo mentions the popular hit Star Raiders, it's obviously designed to minimize the game-playing potential of the system. Interestingly, companies like Alien Ware (and increasingly Dell) seem willing to offer "gaming rigs" without bothering to play up the business/professional potential of these systems.

Matt Barton's picture

Review: FTL's "Dungeon Master" (1987)

Dungeon Master: The Atari STDungeon Master: Dungeon Master (Atari ST Version) FTL's Dungeon Master, released in 1987 for the Atari ST and a year later for the Amiga, represents a defining moment in the evolution of the computer role-playing game. Although it is certainly not the first 3D real-time computer role playing game (see Dungeons of Daggorath), it's probably the first such game to really hit the mainstream. It was the #1 best selling product on the Atari ST platform, and remains one of the best-known and playable of the early CRPGs. Indeed, I've recently become addicted to the game and will probably not be happy until I've completed it! What I intend to do here is discuss some of the game's more innovative features and try to get at what makes this game so endearing and important.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Four-Play now available for the Atari 2600 Video Computer System (VCS)

Four-Play (2006, Atari 2600): Title screen for level 1Four-Play (2006, Atari 2600): Title screen for level 1It looks like yet another high quality homebrew title has been released for the venerable Atari 2600 Video Computer System (VCS), this one based on the famous board game, "Connect Four". Nothing terribly earth shattering, but it looks great, has slick packaging and is priced at only $20 through our friends at AtariAge.

Four-Play is a classic board game that has finally made its way to the Atari 2600. Four-Play has easy to learn rules, but don't expect to become a master as easily! Red and Blue take turns dropping marbles into an upright board. The first player to align four marbles horizontally, vertically, or diagonally wins! Pit your wits against the computer A.I. at four difficulty levels, or play against a friend in two-player mode.

Includes cartridge and full-color manual. Available in NTSC and PAL60 television formats, please specify above when ordering.

brn's picture

whoami - A member's musings on his gaming history

"Willy Byte in the Digital Dimension" for the Apple II"Willy Byte in the Digital Dimension" for the Apple III don't know if this'll show up on my profile page, but I felt like writing up a short history of me and gaming. (ed.: I bumped this to the front page of AA)

1978 - Mmm. Coding basic text games on our Apple II+. Plus I could make a cool string of wine goblets run up the side of the screen.

10 PRINT "Y"
20 PRINT "I"
30 GOTO 10

1980 - The folks bring home an Atari 2600. Love blooms. The games I remember most from this time are Pac Man, Space Invaders, Berzerk, Swordquest: Earthworld, and Combat. Like many people I've talked to, you always had to have one friend with an Intellivision and one with a ColecoVision so that everyone could play every system. :)

Bill Loguidice's picture

Commodork: Sordid Tales from a BBS Junkie

Commodork book coverCommodork book coverRob O'Hara's new book, Commodork: Sordid Tales from a BBS Junkie, has recently been restocked and is available again directly from his Website.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Atari Jaguar, L y n x and store updates from Songbird Productions

Ocean Depths game packaging: for Atari Jaguar CDOcean Depths game packaging: for Atari Jaguar CDAmong other updates, prior Armchair Arcade interview subject Carl Forhan and his Songbird Productions is making, among other things, the "Ocean Depths CD" and "Bomb Squad CD" homebrews more widely available for the Atari Jaguar and its CD attachment. Both games are from Starcat Developments in Germany and require a modified Jaguar that can play encrypted CD's or the use of a bypass cartridge (which is the solution that I implement).

The full update with more information is here:

Bill Loguidice's picture

Atari 2600 Plug 'N Play Keychain - Expect More, Get Less

Basic Fun's Officially Licensed Atari 2600 Plug 'N Play Keychain Series: {Image from the Basic Fun Website}Basic Fun's Officially Licensed Atari 2600 Plug 'N Play Keychain Series: {Image from the Basic Fun Website}While this is hardly breaking news, it's been interesting to follow some of the drama around the "Atari 2600 Plug 'N Play Keychain" series from "Basic Fun". The first part of the drama involves the company's falling out with engineer Curt Vendel, most famous for being the lead on the "Atari Flashback" and "Atari Flashback 2.0" products, and launching "Awesome Arcades". The second and more relevant part of the drama involves the simple fact that these products, amazing form factor and low price aside ($15 each), are awful simulations, seemingly ignoring all the progress made over the past few years in TV Game quality (in fact, reverting back to the NES-on-a-chip of the first Flashback, which has been proven unable to properly simulate Atari 2600 games!). Perhaps "Basic Fun" should have just went with the quality product that Curt had originally delivered for them, rather than scrapping it and doing the products on the super cheap!

While the "Atari Flashback" was a weak simulation of both the Atari 7800 and 2600 systems using the readily available NES-on-a-chip as the platform, the "Atari Flashback 2.0" rectified this by incorporating a clever Atari 2600-on-a-chip, almost perfectly emulating the original hardware. After that and the prior "Commodore 64 30-in-1" (which essentially featured a C-64-on-a-chip), it's hard to go back to the kind of innaccuracies that are present in these keychain devices. Bottom line, the bar has been raised and we truly have the right to expect more, based simply on precedent and the countless other TV Games devices out there that do offer more authentic experiences, even of latter day systems like the Sega Genesis or arcade machines.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Lady Bug and A-VCS-tec Challenge now available for the Atari 2600 VCS!

Lady Bug screenshot: for the Atari 2600 VCSLady Bug screenshot: for the Atari 2600 VCSThanks to our friends at AtariAge, two new homebrew games for the Atari 2600 Video Computer System (VCS) are now widely available. While "A-VCS-tec Challenge" has been made previously available in a limited run (my original blog about it here) - though sourced from Europe - this is the first time I'm aware that this new, original arcade conversion of "Lady Bug" is available for sale.

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