snes

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super nintendo entertainment system

20th Anniversary Famitsu Issue a Gem

Wish I could scan in the most recent copy of famed Japanese magazine Famitsu Weekly, because it is a 20th Anniversary Issue which contains several retro-gaming articles, including a large supplement with mini-reviews on the best games up until the end of the PSX era.

Although my knowledge of Japanese is fairly limited, it's still very interesting to flip through the photos and see what games Japan's most popular gaming magazine considered significant (hint: every Dragon Quest game ever made is on the list).

Matt Barton's picture

Lego my SNEX!

The SNEX: If you get SNEX, you can forget about SEX.The SNEX: If you get SNEX, you can forget about SEX.For God's sake, why? Why smush an Xbox and SNES together in a case made out of Lego blocks and post a dozen pictures of the process on the net? Sadly, some part of me--albeit some deep, dark part that also finds microwave hot and spicy BBQ pork rinds fascinating--finds this sort of thing admirable. It's amazing what a crafty individual can do given enough time, Lego blocks, electronics, and acid. Oops, did I say acid? I meant, er, Jello Pudding Pops.

Matt Barton's picture

The Legend of Zelda: Where Michael Jackson and Satanism Meet

Many of us have suspected that the Legend of Zelda smacked of something subversive, and the video below reveals that my suspicions were warranted. Besides the fact that Link's sexuality is an open question, Zelda is actually based on esoteric Satanic and Wacko Jacko rituals, as evidenced by this secret Japanese television commercial for the Super Famicom version:

Matt Barton's picture

The Evolution of Mario

Super Mario Bros: Has Mario evolved in leaps and bounds?Super Mario Bros: Has Mario evolved in leaps and bounds?Game Daily is running a nice 6-page feature on the history of Nintendo's uber-famous Mario character. The article takes us through the various iterations of Mario, from the humble platforming days to sports, driving, and role-playing. However, I was a bit surprised that the author didn't mention the original Mario Bros game. True, it wasn't nearly as well-developed as Super Mario Bros. for the NES, but the original game did have some nice platforming action (I especially liked the two-step process required to blast the turtles) and established many of the gameplay elements of the later games. I had lots of fun with it on my Commodore 64.

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