coleco

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/buckman/public_html/neo/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
The ColecoVision featured interesting add-ons, including a decent steering wheel and a full-blown computer, the Adam.
Bill Loguidice's picture

Official Game List for ColecoVision Flashback Classic Game Console

AtGames has authorized the exclusive release of the game list for the 2014 edition of the ColecoVision Flashback, which hits major US retailers like Toys''R''Us, Dollar General, and Sam's Club in October.

The 60 game list that appears on the ColecoVision Flashback is as follows:
(Read more)

Bill Loguidice's picture

The ColecoVision Flashback console now up for Pre-order!

ColecoVision FlashbackColecoVision FlashbackHot on the heels of the forthcoming Atari Flashback 5, Intellivision Flashback, and Sega Classic Game Console 2 pre-orders, described here yesterday, Toys "R"Us now has the ColecoVision Flashback available. Like the new Intellivision Flashback product line, AtGames has designed the ColecoVision Flashback to mimic the design of the original console, right down to the removable, backwards compatible controllers. There is also a limited edition set of overlays included, themed to the 60 built-in games. While there is no cartridge or SD slot in the ColecoVision Flashback, it's obviously still going to be something well worth supporting upon its late 2014 release. Note that the design on the front of the box will likely change to reflect the look of the plug and play console, not the original.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Atari 2600, Mattel Intellivision, and Sega Genesis Flashbacks up for Pre-order!

Intellivision FlashbackIntellivision FlashbackWhile we were aware of AtGames' plans for some time regarding the new Atari Flashback, Intellivision Flashback, ColecoVision Flashback, and Sega Classic Game Console releases, among others, for 2014, public details about these items have been sparse. It seems that with pre-orders now appearing on eBay and Toys "R"Us for a vague October 2014 release, some of these previously private details are now revealed.

The Atari Flashback 5 is another refinement of what AtGames started with the Flashback 3, and now includes an impressive roster of 100 games. While it can use wired controllers, it comes with the same wireless joysticks.

The Intellivision Flashback features 60 games, representing approximately half of the original library. The console itself will be small and reminiscent of the original Intellivision's styling. In addition, two new wired controllers, again modeled after the original with just a few modifications, are included (and yes, the discs provide all 16 movement directions). These should work with original Intellivision consoles that feature removable controllers, though that still needs to be tested. As you can also see, a limited edition set of overlays is included, which is a great bonus for collectors.

Unfortunately, the ColecoVision Flashback is not yet up for pre-order. This is likely due to its packaging being finalized last. Without giving away too much, expect a similar package as you see with the Intellivision product.

The Sega Classic Game Console 2, like the name implies, is a refresh of the first Sega Classic Game Console, which itself was a refinement of previous products. A full roster of 80 games is included, and, yes, there's still a cartridge port and two wireless controllers. Wired controllers are still supported. Expect details on other Sega-related products to be revealed soon.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Discounts on Homebrew Videogames at Good Deal Games

Our friends over at Good Deal Games have a big discount on select homebrews in the Homebrew Heaven section of their Website. The deals, which are good until December 15, 2013, and in limited supply, include the following:

Bill Loguidice's picture

Making My Collection Usable - Part II - The Commodore Amiga (photos)

As mentioned previously, I've been going great guns in an attempt to make my overly large collection of 400+ videogame and computer systems more accessible and immediately usable. In other words, figuring out how to waste less of my precious time setting up this stuff and use more of that time actually using what I want to use. Part of that initiative is to take the most "important" computer and videogame systems and put them front and center - and ready to go - in various rooms. I'll discuss the classic videogame consoles in more detail in another post, but basically I've set up a 32" Sony Trinitron CRT to supplement the other basement TV and can now plug in various consoles in that area quickly and easily, though I've changed up where (and how) I'll be making the actual systems themselves accessible. Anyway, where last we left off, I couldn't get my Amiga 600 or 1200 to work, which left me to choose between my Amiga 500, 1000, or 2500HD (with 8088 Bridgeboard). I chose the latter.

With the above in mind, it was of course bugging me that neither the 600 or 1200 were working, so I resolved to address the issue within my limited skillset, and of course when time permitted. Long story short, the 600 is dead, but the culprit in the 1200 was a deceased 40MB hard drive, which was easy enough to remove and replace with a Compact Flash adapter and card with the OS and additional software. In the mean-time, I also got a PAL Amiga 1200, stock, with its own Compact Flash adapter and card with the OS and additional software.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Making My Collection Usable - Part I - The Classic Computers (photos)

As mentioned previously, I've been re-thinking my collecting activities, including selling off the non-working and duplicate portions of my collection, which presently consists of over 430 videogame and computer systems and countless thousands of related software, accessories, and literature. Naturally, part of that reasoning was "thinning the herd" after all these years, because - even though I am thankful to have a relatively generous amount of space for these types of activities - it has long since reached the point where I well and truly have too much to handle. Why has this become an issue? There's simply too much stuff, there's no time to use it (that would need to be my full-time job), and, when I do want to use it, it takes up most of my available time just setting something up, only to have to break it down and put it back on the shelf again. It's innefficient, and frankly, no fun anymore.

With that in mind, in addition to the thinning - which will take a very, very long time of course in a collection I've been cultivating for over 30 years now - I've been plotting how I can make better use of what I have. Like I said, I am thankful to have a relatively generous amount of space. I have a large basement area, with about half unfinished, which is used for storage, and the other, finished half, consisting of an office room, hallway, workout area, and den area. The main floors of our house contain our active systems, including the Xbox 360, PS3, Wii, Co-Star, various computers and handhelds, etc., but they are not an option for me to make use of for classic items, other than on an occasional basis. That just leaves the basement, which is, of course, fine, but also limits my flexibility.

Anyway, even though each area of the basement is brimming with stuff and each section serves a specific purpose, either on a permanent or temporary basis, I decided that my best course of action is to pull out the truly must-have-accessible systems from the hundreds available and make them accessible at a moment's notice. This was not easy to do, as I have a genuine passion for each and every system I own, but the bottom line is is that some systems are more interesting, more "useful," or I simply have a critical mass of items for them that they can't be ignored. I decided I'd tackle that task with my classic computers first, followed by my classic videogame systems at a later date. I cleared space on my big L-shaped computer desk in the office area and proceeded to select the systems that met my criteria and would fit on the desk (I'll have some flexibility when I set up the classic videogame consoles to make a little use of the den area as well).

While I have many different models in most of the specific computer series I selected, I tried to choose the one model in my collection that would give me the most bang-for-the-buck. This in and of itself was not easy, as there's rarely a "most perfect" choice when it comes to choosing the ideal model in a series, which in this case also involved being a good fit for the available space. The systems I chose were as follows: TI-99/4a, Apple IIgs, Atari 600XL, Atari Falcon, Commodore Amiga 2000HD, and Commodore 128DCR, with a special appearance by the Radio Shack Color Computer series, which I'll explain at the end. So yeah, as hard as it was, no Sinclair Spectrum, BBC, IBM PCjr, Coleco Adam, Imagination Machine, MSX, Interact, Exidy, etc., etc., items, even though I'd love to have those out and ready to go as much as the others.

My initial goal - which I was able to accomplish - was to set up a basic system configuration for each and make sure it was working properly. I actually had a slightly different mix of specific systems, but, after testing, found some things didn't function as expected or didn't work at all. Over time, I'll add to each system I've set up (and address the other stuff that's not working) until each and every one is set up properly with their respective disk drives, flash cards, transfer cables, etc., to be fully usable with all of the stuff I have available. At the very least, with these minimum configurations, they're ready to go for most quick usage scenarios. I also decided it was important not to have any of them plugged in full-time, so everything gets hooked up and powered up on demand. This is actually simple and will not delay my usage in any way. In fact, the way I have the various monitors and TV's set up, I can hook up other systems as needed without too much fuss, which is another bonus. Anyway, here are the photos and additional explanation:

Bill Loguidice's picture

Little Known ColecoVision Game Rediscovered!

The CAT Scheduled Oil Sampling GameThe CAT Scheduled Oil Sampling GameI thought this type of discovery deserved a bit of a higher profile, so here goes. Digital Press forum member, "Seaquest", posted about a game his father found about four years ago. I'll let Seaquest's words describe the finding:
"The Cat S.O.S game (Caterpillar scheduled oil sampling game)along with a colecovision was given to every cat dealership in 1983 to support the S.O.S. program. The customers would play it while waiting in the lobby. The game was made by the company Nuvatec. It was never sold commercially and could only be found exclusively in cat heavy equipment dealerships. My dad (who worked at cat) found that they were about to discard of both the game and the console so he saved it and gave it to me to add to my collection.

The game consists of a bulldozer that rides around and pushes dirt. Each dirt pile represents a "job". To keep from exploding you have to send in oil samples to the cat dealership ,then you will be told if the oil is good or bad. If you fail to do this occasionally your oil will go bad and your bulldozer will explode. To clean the oil you have to go to the cat dealership. The goal of the game is to make the most money from finishing "jobs".

I am pretty sure I have one of the last copys left in existense. If anyone knows anything about the value or has any questions please send me a message. Thanks!"

As you can see in the forum topic - which also contains more images - someone has already taken the charge to get the data off the cartridge and create a ROM of this amazing find!

Bill Loguidice's picture

New, Graphically Pleasing Donkey Kong in Development for the Mattel Intellivision?

New Donkey Kong Intellivision (WIP)New Donkey Kong Intellivision (WIP)Anyone remember the mediocre Donkey Kong conversion from Coleco for the Mattel Intellivision? It was a bookend to the awful Atari 2600 version. While I firmly believe there's zero legitimacy to the theory that Coleco intentionally crippled these releases to make their ColecoVision pack-in look all the better, there's no denying that the programmer could have done a better job. Want proof? Thanks to this thread on AtariAge for the reminder, it looks like Beeslife, of stunning Moon Patrol port and update, Space Patrol, fame, just may be at it again with an equally impressive Donkey Kong conversion (NOTE: As of writing this, there's no word of Beeslife involvement, if any, or if this is simply just a proof of concept, since it's still built off of the original Coleco version, despite the addition of the missing screens). Check out the animated screenshot to the left and be sure to visit the Beeslife Website for more of them. Let's hope it gets finished up (whoever that task falls to) and makes it to a release on cartridge! It would be an excellent companion to the upcoming Opcode Games Donkey Kong conversion for the ColecoVision.

Matt Barton's picture

MaximumRD Indicted in Illegal ColecoVision Scheme

MaximumRD Indicted!: MaximumRD, aka Rob Daviau, is in big trouble (arrest photo).MaximumRD Indicted!: MaximumRD, aka Rob Daviau, is in big trouble (arrest photo).Some sad news for those of us who know and love MaximumRD, host of the popular YouTube program dedicated to classic gaming hardware. A Canadian investigation into his activities has led to his arrest and indictment. While the details of the case are still vague (repeated calls to the Toronto officials revealed little info), it appears that Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo have accused him of tricking local residents into thinking that the ColecoVision and games such as Lady Bug and Donkey Kong are just as fun as modern games. Indeed, apparently a few people who bought ColecoVisions from him enjoyed them intensely for months before realizing they weren't awesome. I was able to get in touch with a few of these poor kids, who still think that playing Mr. Do is just as satisfying (if not more so) than Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2. Rob's ColecoVisions were confiscated along with several other contraband consoles that clearly weren't nearly as good as anything out today because they suck.

I will continue to reveal information as it comes to me, but by all means do *NOT* insinuate to anyone that classic games and consoles are "just as fun" as the latest offerings from Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo. Doing so isn't just libelous; it's immoral.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Breaking News: Opcode Games signs deal with Coleco Holdings for Super Game Module

Exciting news for ColecoVision fans, as Opcode Games' in-development expansion module for the classic platform, which, among several other things, will provide much needed RAM to the 1K console, has been officially blessed by Coleco Holdings, and will leverage the name of Coleco's original advertised - but never released - Super Game Module, a device with which it shares some similarities. Read about it here for the announcement and here for the details on the module. For those interested, one of the first games out of the gate that will make use of the low cost module is Donkey Kong Arcade...

Syndicate content