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Founded in 2003, Armchair Arcade is the award-winning Website of author Bill Loguidice and a team of leading authorities on videogame, computer, and technology history and lifestyle. Their ongoing mission is to explore the complete history of videogames, computers, and technology in an intelligent, thought-provoking manner.

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Matt Barton's picture

Nintendo DS Lite -- As Weak as Miller Lite?

I'm still trying to figure out what the bruhaha is over Nintendo's redesigned DS. So it weighs less and has a brighter screen. Excuse me if I don't break into hysterics. Real men (a) don't need a "lighter" handheld; that's why we have massive bulging muscles, and (b) don't need "brighter" colors. Bright colors are for sissies and pansies. Still, I can't seem to get away from news about launch "partays" today--it's on Kotaku, Max Console, Engadget and Joystiq just for starters. Who needs to pay for publicity when everyone's willing to do it for free? Geez. Well, if you're the type of man who would dress up like Mario or Luigi (or Princess) and stand around for hours to get your "Lite," then you deserve what you get. Funny thing is, though, everyone's so enraptured by the DS Lite blitz that they've managed to let this sneak-peak of the PS3 Startup Screen pass by without comment. I, for one, aren't going to mention the DS Lite at all.

Online Vidcast Coin Op TV Mostly Fun, But Needs Polish

As I sit in an Internet Cafe in Tokyo, I decided to take advantage of the high bandwidth and check out a bunch of episodes of the popular online vidcast, Coin Op TV!.

As you can guess from the title, it covers retro games.

For the most part, it is well produced. All the episodes involve reporting on the field using decent quality microphones and have camerawork that is fairly decent. Editing of the segments is a bit plain at times, which is ironically somewhat refreshing-- no avant garde editing techniques here!

Matt Barton's picture

The State of the Homebrew Nation

Nintendo DS: The next king of homebrew?Nintendo DS: The next king of homebrew?There's a good article on a site called DCEMU UK today about The State of Homebrew on All Consoles. The author starts off with the PSP and moves on to discuss homebrew on many systems, including the GB2x and GB32. He claims that the PSP homebrew scene is the biggest at the moment, which would seem to be evidenced by the many posts we've had here recently about it.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Get George Lucas and Paramount on the Phone Pronto!

This is not the copyright infringement you're looking for...This is not the copyright infringement you're looking for...That new Trek movie in December 1979 is sure to give us a sales boost!That new Trek movie in December 1979 is sure to give us a sales boost!I received a delightful original copy of the October 1979 edition of SoftSide, "your BASIC software

Bill Loguidice's picture

Last Logo Tests for Discussion

We can obviously use ANY image as a texture at any zoom level, as these two examples show. (again, these are low res GIF's from the vector source files)

Atari Joystick Odyssey2 Keyboard Faded Thick Border Low Res GIF: I obviously wanted to play on the idea of the top "Armchair" featuring a videogame-centric texture, while the bottom one a computer-centric one (I didn't have anything handy more computer-centric)Atari Joystick Odyssey2 Keyboard Faded Thick Border Low Res GIF: I obviously wanted to play on the idea of the top "Armchair" featuring a videogame-centric texture, while the bottom one a computer-centric one (I didn't have anything handy more computer-centric)

Pitfall 2 Keyboard Thin Border: I think I like thicker borders a bit better than these thin ones, though it might create an interesting sucken effect on the black backgroundPitfall 2 Keyboard Thin Border: I think I like thicker borders a bit better than these thin ones, though it might create an interesting sucken effect on the black background

Bill Loguidice's picture

Some Logo Test Concepts

These are low resolution versions from the vector files to test out some ideas and concepts. I obviously only spent a few minutes on these.

Circuit board testCircuit board test

Brushed Metal testBrushed Metal test

Brushed Metal test 2 with videogame and computer imageBrushed Metal test 2 with videogame and computer image

Bill Loguidice's picture

New Atari 2600 VCS and Coleco ColecoVision Homebrew Cartridges Now Available!

Atari 2600 VCS and ColecoVision Homebrew Games: Atari 2600 VCS>> AStar, Conquest of Mars, Rainbow Invaders, Wolfenstein VCS: The Next Mission * Coleco ColecoVision>> Cosmo Fighter 2, Cosmo Fighter 3Atari 2600 VCS and ColecoVision Homebrew Games: Atari 2600 VCS>> AStar, Conquest of Mars, Rainbow Invaders, Wolfenstein VCS: The Next Mission * Coleco ColecoVision>> Cosmo Fighter 2, Cosmo Fighter 3 Ah, there's nothing I like more than great new games for truly classic systems like the Atari 2600 VCS and Coleco ColecoVision. Atari 2600: "AStar" is a puzzle game from the same guy who did the superb "Fall Down"; "Conquest of Mars" is a translation of "Caverns of Mars" originally on the Atari 8-bit computer systems; "Rainbow Invaders" is a fresh update of the "Space Invaders" concept; and "Wolfenstein VCS: The Next Mission" appears to be a take off on the "Venture" concept. ColecoVision: "Cosmo Fighter 2" and "Cosmo Fighter 3" are re-releases of some of the earliest homebrew titles for the system. I can't wait to check these out further!

Matt Barton's picture

Amiga Workbench in DHTML with Chiptunes

AmigaAmigaThe folks at Chiptune.com have really gone all out with their Amiga-inspired web design. I really like the way they've managed to duplicate the look and feel of the classic Amiga Workbench (version 1.3). They've even got the Guru Meditation error and a working Juggler! The only thing that doesn't seem to work properly is the right mouse button. The site is dedicated to chip tunes, which are a type of computer music that doesn't use digitized sampling. The result is what I consider a more authentic type of music that uses the computer more like a musical instrument than a dubbing or playback device. Have fun!

Matt Barton's picture

Apple to buy Nintendo? Yeah, right!

Bandai Pippin: The "WTH" Gaming Rig Bandai Pippin: The "WTH" Gaming Rig
There's some speculation on Cravetalk that Apple is contemplating buying out Nintendo. Preposterous? Perhaps. Everyone who knows something about Nintendo's corporate history knows how many times others (including Microsoft ) have tried this same manuever--and failed miserably. Nintendo has always struck me as a living anachronism--imperial samarai lords thriving in the modern era. The main reason why I think Nintendo made it big in the first place was their unflinching and bold resolve to bring back console gaming to the US, despite all the flack about the "death of the videogames industry" that followed in the wake of the Great Videogame Crash of 1983. A cozy war with Sega followed, but once Sony and then Microsoft entered the fray, Nintendo's been steadily losing market share.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Notable Entertainment Software for US Home Computers, 1976 - 1979 Launch Systems

BETS (1980) for the Commodore PET: While many games for Commodore's PET computer were purely text-based, some, like Randall Lockwood's BETS (1980), seen here via the VICE: PET emulator, implemented comparatively excellent visuals and animationsBETS (1980) for the Commodore PET: While many games for Commodore's PET computer were purely text-based, some, like Randall Lockwood's BETS (1980), seen here via the VICE: PET emulator, implemented comparatively excellent visuals and animationsAs part of the editing process for my upcoming US home videogame and computer entertainment systems history book, I've been logging the software I mention in each section. I thought it might be interesting to list the software I'm mentioning in the book for the 1976 - 1979, computers section, which I just finished going through. Most of these are the cream of the crop or notable titles.

How many of the following are you familiar with?

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