E3 dies in a car accident

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mikegupta
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http://www.joystiq.com/2006/07/30/e3-canceled-for-next-year-and-beyond/

Is this a sign of things to come? I'm optomistic and all, but could this be a bad sign?

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forcefield58
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E3 and Next-Gen Cancellations

The last couple of years that I've followed E3 have been terribly boring. Its seems to be all about glitter and glamour, like Hollywood I guess. Maybe its the venue I use to follow the event, G4 primarily. I've bought the name-brand game magazines and they didn't have much to offer either. I won't miss the event or the reporting of same.

As for the next-gen titles not making it to the market. If all of the next-gen games are similar to Scarface I can see why they'd be cancelled. I'm all for the "Halo's", "Call of Duty's", etc., but good grief, do we have to play another movie turned into a game??!! I don't think I've played one yet that was worth the money I paid for it.

Does anybody else think the game developers have run out of ideas, or is it just me? I know we've had this discussion before, but I still feel we're being force-fed "more of the same". If I were to make a prediction I'd say that we may be headed for a resurgence in old-style games, platformers, shoot-em-ups, maze-type, etc. Look at the success of Xbox Live Arcade and of the new DS Mario and Brain type games that have sold over a million copies overseas. I, for one, would be happy to see more of a shift in this direction.

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Seb
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If you ask me, a more

If you ask me, a more interesting piece of news is the growing next-gen cancellation list:

http://www.joystiq.com/2006/07/28/scarface-joins-next-gen-cancellation-l...

Seb
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E3's desmise has been

E3's desmise has been greatly exaggerated. This being said, E3 is really important for small developers. It's a unique opportunity to meet publishers, demonstrate what they can do and hopefully pick up contracts, which they need to survive...

Matt Barton
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Oh, no, I agree with that

Oh, no, I agree with that point. There are certainly good game companies out there, most of them fighting to survive. Maybe the demise of E3 will somehow be a boon to these smaller companies. What do you think?

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Seb
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It's probably unfair to

It's probably unfair to paint all game companies with the same brush. It's just business. wheeling and dealing is E3's "raison d’être" after all. I'm rarely privy to these kind of backroom deals anyway (thank god).

Matt Barton
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Ah, that's what you think

Ah, that's what you think now, Seb. But wait until you see it first-hand. It's enough to make any man of integrity feel guilty and ashamed. The general strategy is to make you feel pampered, respect, important, etc. But eventually you realize that you're basically selling your soul.

You know, I've always lived according to my convictions, even if it meant pissing the hell out of people who would gladly push me up the ladder if I'd only back down. Why the hell can't he just "go with the flow?" I don't know. I guess I just don't want success enough to do things that don't feel right.

At the end of the day, the old saying "There's no such thing as a free lunch" always turns out true. The big publishers want me to screw over my students. Sure, I'll require them to purchase the latest edition of a $100 textbook. In return, I get free booze, lots of schmoozing, and opportunities to publish. Yet, what do I do? I do a free textbook in a wiki and have my students use it, all the while encouraging other professors to do the same. Some people would call that stupidity. Why piss off the publishers? They're just trying to make money. They're good people. It's nothing personal. It's just business, Barton, just business. You know what I say? $@$@# business. I'm not going to compromise a single value just so some $@$@# can make a payment on his granddaughter's Lexus.

E3 and other industry events are the same type of deal. Just a bunch of spiders inviting you into their parlor. You're not going to get anything there but caught.

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Seb
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Greasy deals!

They're trying to revert it back to an "industry-only" event, as opposed to the big media circus it's become over the years. Since i'm probably going to be at the next one, i really don't mind the liquor bars and gourmet-dinners at high-end restaurants! Count me in for the "greasiest, slimiest deals". :)

Matt Barton
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I agree very much with Bill.

I agree very much with Bill. From what I was able to see of E3 through second-hand reports and the like, it was a cesspool of all of the very worst aspects of the industry. The fact that they had to make such a big deal about "booth babes" highlights that fact. Indeed, it's severely embarrassing to me that anyone would ever thought "booth babes" were a good idea. For God's sake, how are we ever going to get anyone to take this industry seriously with such goings on???

I can also say that such "expos" are where most of the greasiest, slimiest deals go through. I've seen similar activities taking place at major academic conferences, where commercial publishers of textbooks throw free alcoholic parties and do their best to woo over the professoriate and keep them assigning grotesquely over-priced textbooks to the students. We're talking liquor bars and gourmet-dinners at high-end NYC spots like the Cocacabana, and that's only for writing profs. I can only imagine what goes on at conferences for bigger, more fertile fields.

At any rate, again speaking from an academic perspective, smaller but well-funded niche conferences are almost always better. You get more time to study the exhibits and hear papers, for one thing, and you get more opportunities to actually meet and confer with well-established and respected folks. Plus, the crowd they attract are more focused on the subject matter and aren't just there to get a bullet on a resume or whatever.

Finally, the reporting of the last few E3s has seemed rather obligatory and made for boring reading. Nintendo, Sega, or Microsoft farts and it's on sixty blogs and twelve YouTubes within minutes. Do we really need that? I, for one, think not.

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Bill Loguidice
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E3 gone a big deal? Not

E3 gone a big deal? Not really. The idea of one big show once a year actually became passe' in Japan years ago and it was only a matter of time before the same happened here. It's a rather old fashioned notion going all the way back when CES was the hot show for videogame and computer stuff. Some time in the late 70's it was realized that videogames could sell beyond the holiday season and conceptually I think the same thing applies here to something like an E3. It seems counterproductive to have to peak for a single industry event when the industry is active ALL YEAR. Smaller shows in different territories should improve coverage and help to reach even more people. Certainly classic computer and videogame shows have shown that regular regional events can be quite successful, so why not for the modern and forthcoming stuff?

=================================
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[ My collection ]
[ http://www.MythCore.com ]

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