Final Price for TI-99/8 - Only a few hundred ever made and it was never released

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Bill Loguidice
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Following the trend of other super 8-bits released by Commodore, Apple and Tandy, TI had their own in the works, the TI-99/8 (TI 99/8), not released due to their withdrawal from the home computer market (but it certainly would have been awesome!). Check it out here: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=ADME:B:EOIBUAA:...

Obviously it was a "bit" too rich for my blood... ;-)

Select models of the test run had working Pascal, but this is not one of those models. I'm sure one with a working Pascal implementation would have fetched even more!

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Bill Loguidice
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A Final TI-99/8 Prototype up for Bid

For the millionaires out there, have at it: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=170023652825

I bid just for fun, knowing I would be immediately blown away, so no worries...

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[ My collection ]
[ http://www.MythCore.com ]

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Bill Loguidice
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Pascal on the TI

It was actually an option on the instant on boot up menu along with BASIC and what-not. It was just an implementation of the language that would let you program under it or use it as an OS. Probably similar to what Apple did on their II computers. TI, starting with the TI99-4, always had different options available on the startup screen, which is kind of nice. I think it's a friendlier, more organized approach than just starting in BASIC or at a ready prompt.

=================================
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[ My collection ]
[ http://www.MythCore.com ]

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Bill Loguidice
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A bit more on the TI-99 line

TI was always a fourth or fifth option here in the US. Even with TI discouraging third party development, it's actually surprising the depth and breadth of the software library across all types, be it applications, games or utilities. A lot of stuff came on cartridge, but it also had quite a bit on tape. A smaller amount was on disk due to the crazy setup that was generally required, but it still had reasonable support, like from Infocom.

Over the years it has become a favorite collecting target of mine. Lots of stuff is available and its fascinating what one would never think was actually available for it. Interestingly, the TI-99/4 was released here in 1979, but was very overpriced and not competitive ultimately. The 4a - which most people are familiar with and is most readily available - was released a few years later. Compatibility was pretty good between the two. It was actually a tough call in the book I'm writing whether to place the TI-99/4 as the start of the line and put it with the 1976 - 1979 era, but I've decided due to 4a to start there. Of course the history part will talk about the 4.

In any case, what ultimately killed the TI as it did most computers of the time was Commodore being able to drive prices down to ridiculously low levels. Since Commodore had their own chip manufacturing division and were able to control quite a bit of other manufacturing areas and development, they had the ability to put things out cheap and still make a profit. Companies like TI didn't have that luxury and had to ultimately price systems at a loss. Not even a TI could keep that up for long.

=================================
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[ My collection ]
[ http://www.MythCore.com ]

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Mark Vergeer
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That probably would have been a pascal interpreter?

Wow, didn't know TI had something like this up their sleeve. Shame this device is never released. TI wasn't a big brand over here in the Netherlands. In the past some Photoprint/photoshops selling a few consumer electronics like camera's, calculators and home computers were selling the TI line of machines but there was hardly any software available over here.

-= Mark Vergeer - Armchair Arcade editor =-

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