Matt's Podcast June Edition

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Hi, guys, I had the itch to do an audio podcast today, so here ya go! Don't expect slick production values, though--this is just some off-the-cuff stuff about all the exciting things Bill and I have been working on. Those projects include the forthcoming Vintage Game Consoles book, Frayed Knights II dungeons, and of course Matt Chat interviews and retrospectives. If you'd like to propose topics for me to cover in future episodes, please do so below!
Download or stream the podcast here.
Now back to work!

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ruthan
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...

As i said, these Podcast monologs, are now much, much better than, usualy Matt chats video.

Who: Brujah Zealot, the pimp of babylons bitch. / Location: Scorched heart of Europe. // Sorry for my moldavian sort of english, i have 2 possibilities, to be silent or try to say something +look like idiot..

Rob Daviau
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Joined: 05/19/2006
Good stuff Matt...

Excellent and fun as always! As is with everything you do (including MATT CHAT!)

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Mark Vergeer
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Joined: 01/16/2006
Excellent topics Matt

Cool 'June podcast' Matt, very enjoyable like the Matt Chat episodes you do. It's awesome collaborating on a game - I know from experience :P
Have a good productive summer Matt!

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Rowdy Rob
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Great podcast

I fully enjoyed this podcast. I am quite surprised that you are designing levels for Frayed Knights II. I guess I shouldn't be, since you are a highly productinve person, so it's yet another feather in your cap.

As for your "sheltered" rural upbringing limiting your geek experiences, you seem to have more than made up for it. If I recall correctly, you had a "geek" father who not only was into computers, but actively played videogames with you! That had to be majorly influential.

Anyhow, I'm looking forward to your next podcast!

Matt Barton
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Father son gaming

Rowdy Rob wrote:
I fully enjoyed this podcast. I am quite surprised that you are designing levels for Frayed Knights II. I guess I shouldn't be, since you are a highly productinve person, so it's yet another feather in your cap.
As for your "sheltered" rural upbringing limiting your geek experiences, you seem to have more than made up for it. If I recall correctly, you had a "geek" father who not only was into computers, but actively played videogames with you! That had to be majorly influential.
Anyhow, I'm looking forward to your next podcast!

That's very true, Rob. My dad and I played lots of games together on the C64 and later the Amiga. Still have fond memories of Ports of Call and Empire. He dabbled in programming, but never got much beyond tinkering.

I was no doubt lucky to have a dad so into computers back then. Most of my friends only had game consoles and never got into all the cool creative stuff you could do with an Amiga back then (music, dpaint, word processing, etc.) Ha, funny to think that I was the only kid who printed out his homework back then. Guess that's expected nowadays.

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Rowdy Rob
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Opposite life:

Matt, I seem to have had an opposite life to yours: I spent many years growing up in Tokyo, the largest city in the world at the time. I was surrounded by tech (computers, videogames, gadgets galore, etc.). I had a great group of geeky friends that would play D&D, Traveller, Starfleet Battles, Gamma World, and so forth. Our school had a computer lab with TRS-80's. and later, Atari 800's (which is odd, I know). We also had a school computer club where we all hung out and played videogames on the Apple II all day. And there was an Air Base computer club, which eventually fractured into Apple, Atari, and Commodore users groups.

Then I ended up in rural South Carolina. No geeks, no geek scene.

Matt Barton wrote:
Ha, funny to think that I was the only kid who printed out his homework back then. Guess that's expected nowadays.

Going the "tech" route worked against me in my college English class. I printed out my essay on "Mark Twain" with my then-awesome dot-matrix printer that did amazing 'letter-quality' printing and graphics. I printed out a cool cover page for my paper with big, fancy letters!

When the instructor graded and was returning the papers, he held my paper up to the class and said "Look! A video paper!" and the class laughed. The instructor was not amused with my flashy paper, writing "this could have been written just by reading the critics!" and giving me a harsh grade.

This pissed me off for two reasons:

1) It seemed that going the extra mile to present a snazzy document resulted in my work getting extra scrutiny, and..

2) He was right, I didn't read the material, and was just parroting the critics! I was busted. :-)

Matt Barton
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Sorry to hear about that

Sorry to hear about that teacher, Rob. Sounds like he was one of those jerks who liked to score some points by embarrassing his students. Always hated teachers like that.

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Rowdy Rob
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Good teacher, actually.

He was actually a very good teacher, and was generally very inspring and animated. He didn't actually name me when he held up my paper, just showed a "random" paper to the class to get a laugh. And, in the end, he said that I had the potential to be an excellent writer.

I think he suspected I was trying to dazzle my way into a higher grade, and worked to counter that. If I recall correctly, he did give me the opportunity to rewrite my paper, which I did. I think I still got a disappointing grade, though, since I wasn't that enthused about Mark Twain.

Anonymous (not verified)
Proprietary stuff

Matt,

I love all your podcasts and chats. Well done and keep it up! I still have to manage to send you some beer one of these days.

Referring to your "why people always get nostalgic about proprietary hardware" comment, I feel that perhaps people are nostalgic because they can recall an Apple or Amiga, while a PC clone is completely particular to the user that put it together. Nostalgia (for pop culture objects anyway) seems to be visible when it's shared.

Question: what software are you using to design the Frayed Knights levels?

All best!

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