Microsoft unveils the next Xbox: Xbox One - What they said and what it means!

Bill Loguidice's picture

Yes, Christina and I will be working on another Xbox book!While we had a previous poll and some thoughts and speculation on the next Xbox here at Armchair Arcade (among many other thoughts from staff and other commenters), it's now time to discuss the reality from today's #XboxReveal, with Microsoft the last of the three to play its next generation hand. As you no doubt already know, Nintendo's Wii U is struggling mightily, while Sony's PS4 has a lot of positive buzz so far and will be released around the same time as the new Xbox (Xbox One). With all that said, let's take a look at what was just unveiled.

Microsoft Xbox OneMicrosoft Xbox One- They're calling it the Xbox One. This name was on no one's radar that I was aware of. They're definitely taking a page from smartphones, tablets, and Nintendo's playbooks with a name like that. It's not necessarily awful. It's one of those "safe" names, though, and not exactly inspirational. It's clear they think they have gamers in the bag with a name like that. That name is for the non-gamers out there.

- A next generation Kinect comes with it.

- Both the console and new Kinect are very boxy, which is clearly a conscious design decision to fit in with the flat modern interface UI of Windows Phone and Windows 8 (and now this system). At the same time, they're also quite shiny (black), so it's an interesting look.

- The Xbox One is designed to pass through and integrate with your TV experience seamlessly.

- The Xbox One interface is very much like Windows Phone and Windows 8. This should work well for a TV, big screen experience.

- Say, "Xbox on" and the Xbox One immediately takes over your TV. That's the "always on" angle that was causing many people angst.

- The Xbox One has instant switching between TV, game, music, Internet, etc. Very fast!

- It has a Windows 8-style window snap mode, so you can put something on the side while doing something else. For instance, watch a movie, then snap a browser window to the side. Multitasking is front and center.

- Skype HD is built-in. With the always on integration, this could really make video calling faster and easier than ever.

- You can say, "Xbox, ESPN," for instance, and it will go immediately to that channel. Presumably this is using some type of IR blaster to control your cable box, though it's possible there may be some deeper integration. Certain channels or events will have deeper integration, for instance, with sports, you might be able to pull up live stats.

- The Xbox One Guide provides rich access to current TV listings. Again, when showing this, they're showing how quickly everything switches. As users of the Wii U know, any type of lag can be a killer, so if this is how quickly it works in reality, it's a killer feature.

- It's supposed to be virtually silent when running. We'll see, but this is obviously important for something always on.

- The new Kinect's voice features are now more conversational and supports multiple family members.

- The new Kinect's tracking appears nearly one-to-one, which is a big step up from the original Kinect.

- One of the Xbox 360's killer features was its excellent controller. It looks like this winning design was iterated on and improved, but not changed dramatically for the Xbox One. That's probably a good thing. So the three main control methods are controller, Kinect, and smartglass (the second screen stuff for smartphones and tablets that few people use). Kinect is supposed to recognize when you (specifically you) pick up the controller and resumes your specific saved game, as an example. Nice. The more seamless moving between the control schemes, the better.

- Xbox LIVE has the same membership structure. All content is stored in the cloud, including your games, making them available from anywhere. We'll see what that means in reality, as there may be some type of PS4-level real-time streaming going on.

- Bluray is there. USB 3.0. 500GB hard drive. Etc. All the usual next gen hardware bullet points (at least in terms of Sony's PS4).

- EA recently lost interest in the Wii U. Not surprisingly, EA had a big presence at Microsoft's event. EA was making a big deal about a new type of technological core for their games, which may have played into deciding not to support the Wii U. This stuff might simply require PS4/Xbox One/PC-level power and it may not make sense to do separate products for the Wii U considering its present sales pace.

- There appears to be some type of instant social sharing like Sony's PS4 will have.

- Microsoft is pushing transmedia for Halo (their one major property). Halo will be a television series, but there is a hint that the integration will go a big deeper.

- As a demonstration of the Xbox One's integration, they were showing a live NFL broadcast running alongside a fantasy football app, while also running a video chat between friends. If it gets used, it will be a fun social experience. That's a big if, though.

Now some will criticize that they didn't show enough games (though there was a major Call of Duty announcement), but that's what E3 next month is for, plus, it's the quality of these other, non-game features that will arguably make or break the system long-term. We already know it will feature and play certain types of games and that the system has a certain amount of power. It's what's done with that power (and, as the Wii U proves, what comes out consistently post launch) that will ultimately matter. In any case, the event was short, but overall pretty sweet. It's now up to E3 for us to see all the other stuff, like launch date (beyond later this year), pricing, major games (they're promising "exclusives", etc.). We just have a few more weeks to wait.

What are your thoughts?

(Check out some additional features, updates, and links to more photos here, here, and here)

Comments

clok1966
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I dont get the like for that

I dont get the like for that guy (sterling) I quit reading anything of his a year or two ago .. Which is not to say he inst well worth a listen.. We all need to form our own opinions, and I bear no ill will for those who like him ( as there are many) he is like most one sided people. Rush Limbaugh, Michael Moore.. etc.. they all have some good ideas, conversations, stuff people should know about, but they peppers them with PURE BS and fear mongering to get his point across.. thankfully he is talking video games not Major news stories.. blow a video game thing out of proportion its not so big a deal.. but real world stuff and being the fools those others are is bad.

I keep posting the negatives here.. I do care.. but in the end I don't think its the end of the world.. but I do HONESTLY believe I will quite buying consoles if this stuff is true. I care enough to post, but often think im making a MT out of a molehill, it is just games. Right now its a bit depressing as while MS is getting the brunt of the backlash now. I am all but sure (again if its all true) Sony will march to the same drummer, there is no way MS will do it and the companies who make games will let SONY off the hook.. they will do it too.. the only thing they are doing right is keeping there mouth shut for now and letting MS stick its foot in..

The biggest reason i can see to worry.. tablets and phones are already taking bites out of the consoles.. a big mistep, like this could put console makers way back.. that will help the casules, and hurt the games IMHO.

and now Im going to break a vow to never listen or read JIM again.. dang it.. all good train wrecks need people to gawk.. and Im a gwaker when it comes to video game news.

Bill Loguidice
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Gamers can now move onto the

Gamers can now move onto the next thing to over-react about. | Microsoft outlines used games, licenses, family sharing http://bit.ly/ZUBK5k

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Mark Vergeer
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XBox One...

Xbox One...?

My 2 Cents :P

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Bill Loguidice
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Yes, the incredibly clever

Yes, the incredibly clever play on words, like "Xbox Done" and what-not. There is a remarkable amount of vitriol out there. We'll see if it translates to poor sales or not. Certainly Sony is getting a lot of positive buzz as a result, warranted or not.

My point is, in a world where we already have the ubiquitous connections and use services that both require a connection and also check in, complaining about something that checks in once a day seems remarkably silly. That's also ignoring the positives a validation system offers. It's almost like the equivalent of someone complaining about Netflix because Netflix requires a constant connection to work, or Steam, because it needs to validate you at least once a week. In today's world, once a day is not a big deal. We have the connections anyway.

Other people are complaining about Kinect always listening for the two words that turn it on. Or that somehow it's "always watching you." I guess we'll conveniently ignore the cameras on our phones, the cameras on our computers, etc. I'll take the advancement in technology, thank you, over irrational fears. Our cell phones already report back our every move, every purchase we make is tracked anywhere, except when cash is used, except when we're recorded by cameras in the place, etc. It's time to deal with the reality of our modern world, both the positives and negatives technology brings us. I'm not moving backwards.

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Rob Daviau
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Well

Bill Loguidice wrote:
Gamers can now move onto the next thing to over-react about. | Microsoft outlines used games, licenses, family sharing http://bit.ly/ZUBK5k

That is your opinion Bill. You and some others may see it as "over reacting" but is it? Perhaps it's simply just reacting or reacting just the right amount, who is anybody to say? It's great that you are so open minded and seemingly accepting (apologetic?) towards Microsoft. Like most, I have watched and witnessed pretty much everything I can regarding Microsoft's next console and hey I am the first to admit that obviously much of what has been demonstrated, leaked, falsified, reported, rumoured etc is not impressing me at all. I admit maybe I am somewhat primitive or old fashioned in my thinking that the most important things to me regarding any "gaming console" launch is, crazy as it sounds, first and foremost that it be a good gaming platform, next probably strong 1st and 3rd party support for GAMES than lastly, present this at a decent and fair price point. MAYBE you could add Proper Backwards compatibility BUT we'll throw that one on the back burner as that topic is vast enough on it's own. Oh yes, and I want to be able to sell / trade / buy used games just as I always have for every past gaming console up to this point.

Am I in the minority wanting this? Maybe so. EVERYTHING and ANYTHING else Microsoft is proposing whether it comes to pass or not I certainly do not want to have to pay extra for let alone put up with or "accept". Those of us who are not impressed or are even opposed to all the things everyone seems to be "over reacting" about are not necessarily in the wrong. Is it really so much that we don't want to be dragged kicking and screaming into the "next gen" or that we simply know what we want and what we don't? I guess I am simply a believer in the consumers "right of first sale" as I understand it that Microsoft is attempting to circumvent. Microsoft's recent damage control attempt claiming "It's up to publishers" regarding DRM / Used games etc, considering the attitude and stance publishers have taken the last few years CLEARLY they WILL ALL enforce it in the worst possible ways, if they have the "options" to use DRM, limit used games, use any restrictions at all then they absolutely will. I think this is just Microsoft's way to try to keep their hands clean pointing the finger at the publishers instead of owning up to the options THEY put in place. Not saying that maybe, MAYBE some of what Microsoft propose might be what is best for the industry and consumers but I am certainly not convinced that every decision MS seems to be making is with the intention of pleasing consumers or moving the industry forward. Big companies make huge errors in marketing and management all the time that result in huge profit loss or consumer backlash so bad that their plans come back to bite them on the ass. There is certainly nothing wrong with a little bit of skepticism, questing or outright outrage towards Microsoft at this point, it tells them what the consumer wants and it is our money they are craving why should Microsoft / Sony / Nintendo or any video game company be treated any different than any other business or service? If people did not react as they do perhaps we would still be using Windows Millennium or Vista.

I refuse to simply accept that all these decisions regarding DRM, verification, Kinect, used games restrictions and the rest of it are simply the "way forward" for next gen gaming, sure Microsoft (and possibly others) may WANT it to be and would love everyone to just accept it without question or be branded someone who is somehow against "evolving gaming technology" or suppressing the way forward that next gen gaming is meant to go. Yes they would like the consumer to believe that their proposals are the only logical way but I do not believe that is truly the case. The way forward for next gen gaming is in how we chose or refuse to go, not to say the consumer will get his way on every issue and surely there are aspects we will accept in the end but I would like to think we will have SOME say in at least a percentage of how the gaming landscape will develop in the end. If not then we have nobody to blame but ourselves as has happened before but surely by not whining, bitching, moaning and over reacting we are doomed to have our future of gaming decided for us.

There was a time I voiced concerns of my beloved console gaming becoming to "PC" like, honestly, around the time modern internet connection, communities, multi-player, DLC, services etc became the norm on consoles I was getting cautious and while I fully admit that yes many of those things DID turn out to be beneficial and fun and lent themselves to a more immersive gaming experience (myself I have no interest in online / multiplayer but I can understand those that do) but honestly, now with everything going on with Microsoft lately I no longer see it as becoming to "PC" like, I fear it may even take a direction far more restrictive, spying, controlling and consumer rights destroying. I hope I am proven wrong between E3 and the actual consumer release of the next round of consoles. I guess we'll see right?

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Bill Loguidice
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So, Rob, tell me specifically

So, Rob, tell me specifically what about the gaming prowess of the Xbox One you don't like? Just because, like all modern consoles, it does other stuff, doesn't mean it won't also hit all your gaming points. E3 is where they'll talk mostly gaming. The initial announcement was not gaming focused. Every announcement has its own goals, just like when Nintendo didn't show final hardware at the Wii U's announcement, and Sony didn't even show a console at theirs for the PS4.

Again, just because it's a new way of doing things, or at least a new way of doing things on console (PC, tablets and smartphones already well follow these models), doesn't automatically make it wrong...

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Rob Daviau
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Bill Loguidice wrote:
So, Rob, tell me specifically what about the gaming prowess of the Xbox One you don't like? Just because, like all modern consoles, it does other stuff, doesn't mean it won't also hit all your gaming points. E3 is where they'll talk mostly gaming. The initial announcement was not gaming focused. Every announcement has its own goals, just like when Nintendo didn't show final hardware at the Wii U's announcement, and Sony didn't even show a console at theirs for the PS4. Again, just because it's a new way of doing things, or at least a new way of doing things on console (PC, tablets and smartphones already well follow these models), doesn't automatically make it wrong...

And it does not automatically make it right as well does it? As I stated just because it is the will of Microsoft and their concept of how gaming should progress does not make it right either. Obviously, I cannot comment on the gaming prowess right? Note my comment at the end about E3. However, if it turns out to be the most mind blowing, best looking, most interactive and fluid gaming system with 50 awesome 1st and 3rd party launch titles does that change ANY of my points or opinions regarding anything else? No I don't think so. Just because you are willing to embrace it all does not mean everyone should be expected to or want to, if you end up being happy and satisfied with the final product / service than hey GREAT and good for you, again does not change the things that are wrong about what Microsoft is doing or that it is not the solution for everybody, as I said big companies (Microsoft / EA . Sony etc) make bad decisions regarding services and products all the time, as far as all the Microsoft backlash my only point to you was that it is YOUR opinion that people are over reacting and it is my opinion that they are not because it is only with voicing opinions / concerns that companies may take notice. Note also that I was pretty clear about what I wanted and didn't want was MY opinion, I am not saying everyone or anyone needs to be in agreement, it is MY view (though from reaction around various gaming groups and sites one shared by many) but either way my point was it is not for me, you or anyone to decide what is acceptable and what is not for every consumer anymore than it is up to Microsoft, it is up to the individual consumer if Microsoft's next console is going to be for them or not, if so great, if NOT than they can choose the action they feel is appropriate from simply not buying it to buying it and sucking it up and dealing with how it is going to be to over reacting anyway they see fit lol.

I stand by all my comments and points in my original post as I know and expect you would, it is not my intent to change the other persons view but of course we can agree to disagree. I just (in my opinion) find it odd that you seem to be so pro Xbox ONE, like you are totally all in to the point where you seem practically defensive about it (complaining about people over reacting and such) maybe your next book will be about how all the Xbox ONE owners can get the most out of the new console!? You have every right to love and support everything about the new Xbox gaming platform from hardware to service to restrictions etc, as does anyone else as well I have the right to question Microsoft's agenda as does anyone else.

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Bill Loguidice
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I like to give

I like to give counter-points, Rob. It's not always how I necessarily feel. I have seen a disturbing trend though where, whatever the technology of late, someone will have something crazy to say about it, whether it's because they don't fully understand how it works, or simply because it's from a company they don't care for (or, in turn, it's a threat to a company that they love). It's hard to take some of these arguments against any of this stuff seriously when they're so over-the-top, or resort to juvenile actions. I'm not necessarily calling out anyone here on that, either, but it's hard to sort through the genuine good points among so many obvious over-reactions that are out there.

And yes, I will be doing an Xbox One book, but, just like with the Wii U book, I'll have no problem pulling the plug if it's indeed a turkey. The PlayStation Vita book was ill-advised, and I don't plan on wasting time on another book like that. The market has changed so dramatically that it's impossible to pick what will and will not be a success. Even though the Wii U had a few issues, I never dreamed it would get such a listless reaction from the buying public. I'm still not sure how the reaction to the PS4 or Xbox One will go considering what happened with the 3DS, Vita, and Wii U. It's all different now. I do know though that all this vitriol in the Xbox One's case from what are referred to as "core" gamers (not that I like that term either) won't have a major impact on the Xbox One's ultimate fate. The audience is much bigger than that. That's part of the Wii U's problem. The base bought the systems, but it hasn't resonated outside that base. The Xbox One may have the reverse issue. Again, I'm still not sure about the PS4, but I guess all that will firm up as we get closer to the launches.

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Mark Vergeer
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Well...

As a media streaming machine it could really work, there are a ton of people who have a very hard time operating the TV and the Satellite/Cable box and get confused by all the remotes that lie on the coffee table. If it is possible to make it all work and just say "Xbox ON" it's great and will probably help out a ton of people. Having a system that is constantly listening to you / monitoring you combined with the NSA's PRISM surveillance program it quickly could turn into something potentially sinister. More so for people outside of the US.

What works for streaming media: renting a movie or paying a monthly fee for access to a library of music, movies and tv-shows is great and would be very welcome in my neck of the woods. You can totally treat it as disposable consumable entertainment that works in the here and how and that's great. Especially at the low prices these things often work at. What doesn't work is when prices of this media are close to or higher as the price paid for the item to come in a way that allows the user complete freedom to play it now or ten years down the line. Lend it to a friend or whatever. Without having to check in with some company.

In the Netherlands for a long time ebooks had draconian DRM that often even hindered legitimate use and quite often made the books not available or readable anymore. They also were MORE EXPENSIVE than their paper counterparts that had less restrictions on their use. For a long time ebook sales in the Netherlands were far lower than the old fashioned books. Now a lot of the draconian DRM has been removed on ebooks over here. Some are watermarked so the owner can always be traced which make people take care not to spread those files around like madman as it can be traced/linked back to them. Also the price is often significantly lower than their paper counterparts and the sales of ebooks are on the rise. People treat ebooks as disposable items often or store them on their home servers for later use. I personally download and read quite a few magazines on the iPad or Nexus7 because it's a cheaper, better for the environment and often I don't want to keep the mags anyway.

Games are a different matter. Streaming games for a monthly fee is cool and I like that. Even downloadable games like the Xbox Live Arcade games on the 360 for small money I like. Especially when it is not super limited - okay it's tied to my account but I can also tie it to the machine and have it function without any network connection even after the servers failed and ceased their operation. What makes games different is that often I don't have the time to play a game in the here and now and I will put it away for a later day, a holiday or a free weekend to play. Often in chunks and often in places that don't have the internet ready. I've been known to log my Laptop or gaming console with me on holidays when we have a roadtrip and go. In the recent past I've encountered not being able to read my e-books/e-magazines after an 8 hour drive to a relative's house just because of servers and DRM issues. Rented movies and streaming media often doesn't work across the border in Europe where it actually should as there is a supposed to be a free travelling of people and goods within the European Union. When I go sit in my car and drive for an hour and a half I can be out of the country - easy. And yet not all media/books etc function. A lot of people work and live in different countries in Europe especially in the border areas. It just complicates things more than it should. And when games that are delivered in a disposable restricted format that doesn't ensure me that I am actually able to play that 50-60 dollar/euro game 5 years down the line it's rubbing me the wrong way. If they cost considerably less it would be different.

I'd like to have the choice. Cloud gaming for cheaper prizes or old fashioned non-cloud gaming at a higher price/current prices with all the freedom we're used to without having to pay a fee. All these restrictions and people just eagerly going for it regardless only works if you got a disposable income and don't really care about what's next and if you'll be able to make some money back selling or even giving away items to a friend. It used to be possible to inherit someones record collection or books. With ebooks and digital media this is out of the question. It doesn't work like that for digital media.

All the restrictions and extra fees on things that used to be care free is just becoming ridiculous regardless of how nice and swanky all the new technology is:
"This game disc is actually a digital download and it will self destruct in less than 8 years from now"
"If you read the book in one go it's 20% less."
"For bookmark functionality 10cents more."
"Oh my want to go back a few pages, only 1 cent per page extra."
"Using reading glasses? Well for 2.50 we'll increase the font size to provide a better reading experience for you."
"Hey I see you picked up some people from the train station, still want to listen to that Green Day album? Well a nice 10% discount on the full album price for all your passengers if you press PLAY. And don't forget no rewinding or skipping a track, that will be possible for just a 10% additional fee per listener."
"You read the latest Dan Brown haven't you? You want to recommend it to your friend? Well if you want to mention the name of the protagonist and one of the main adversaries in the book it's just 20 cents. For just mentioning the title and an almost certainty that he/she will actually buy the book themselves and not borrow it from you you get a 20% discount on your next three books purchased in the state of Illinois. Reading them however can only be done standing up underneath the running shower in the State of Missouri though. "

Not against DLC, if a user can back it up and have access to it even after the seller has ceased support even on a replacement system it's fine by me. Otherwise we'll be creating a new landfill of XBox One game discs in a couple of years time...

But the way things look now...

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Rowdy Rob
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Some of my thoughts, pro and con.

I have a variety of thoughts on this topic.

First of all, let’s look at what the XBox One offers: A fully-fledged multimedia device with voice-and-motion-activated controls, cable TV/media integration, improved Kinect abilities (reading heartbeats?!?!?!), integrated Skype video-phone, and of course, more powerful gaming abilities. Does that not sound cool? Does that not sound like the future?

Some points of thought here that perhaps both sides of this argument should consider:

1) The idea that you can’t sell or give away your digital media anymore.... well, it’s not like the media itself will be lost to time. Like they say, everything in the digital domain/Internet lasts forever. In many ways, the digital age is actually beneficial to preserving art/literature/music/software, since it exists as ones and zeros somewhere out there in cyberspace. From this point on, we probably won’t lose valuable parts of our digital culture, unlike the lost works of many artists, filmmakers, and musicians of yesteryear. We’re not going to lose our games in the future; someone will be able to play them. Heck, I doubt that videogame producers wipe their drives of code after the release of the game; someone has it. A lot of you collectors out there are thinking about historical preservation; well, that will not be necessary anymore in the digital age.

2) We talk about the companies being greedy, but what about the consumers being greedy? Yes, if you buy a DVD or Blu-ray movie (or a book), you can sell or give it away, but at no benefit to the original producers of such media. To illustrate the point, if you go to the movie theater and watch “The Avengers,” after enjoying the movie, can you sell your ticket stub to someone at a vastly reduced price and say “enjoy the movie?” Hey, you paid for the movie, right? Why can’t you do that? If you could, does that sound right or ethical? If you were the company producing the media, wouldn’t you want to get paid for your efforts every time someone enjoys your product? Why wouldn’t you want that? You worked for it!

3) WE BROUGHT THIS ON OURSELVES. DRM, draconian “phone home” procedures, “consolization” of games, ID’ed games and music, Napster, Pirate Bay, and so forth. We wouldn't have to deal with this today if we weren’t pirates yesterday. We, the consumers, are greedy as well, if you think about it. Think of all the classic games that you played in the past, on the 8-bits and 16-bit machines, that only sold less than 100,000 (or less) copies. Even back then, there were millions of computers sold, yet some of the greatest games sold a miniscule percentage of copies. Unlike other "hard" goods, stealing digital media is as easy as a click of a button. I believe the vast majority of computer games in the past were played by pirates. But hey, those greedy bastards that programmed the game deserved it, right?

4) Progress requires that some of the old ways must die. I have no idea how to ride, feed, or otherwise take care of a horse, but I rather like driving a car. And a horse could never take me across the world like an airplane can. I don’t have to be strip-searched every time I ride a horse, but I like the idea of flying to Europe when I want to.

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Okay, I suspect Bill will probably agree with a lot of what I just said, but on the other hand...

5) You’ll (arguably) have a surveillance device right in your living room, and you’ll have paid for it! Every show you watch, every phone call you make, everything you buy... heck, the XBox One has a camera that watches you! That’s straight-out “Big Brother,” right out of the book “1984,” with the TV watching you! In light of the current IRS/NSA scandals happening right now in the USA, it doesn’t seem as far-fetched as it might have even a couple of months ago to have the government(s) cataloging everything you think or do, and the consoles are giving them the tools! But if you’re not doing anything wrong, you have nothing to worry about, right? You’re not thinking or saying any “wrong” thoughts, right? No “thought crimes,” right? No “conservative” thoughts, right? *cough* IRS *cough*

6) Your freedom to game/view/listen to what you paid for is governed by the whims of the corporations. You paid for the media, but “the corporation” has deemed that you can’t enjoy it anywhere outside your living room unless you cough up extra money. Imagine these scenarios: Do you want to listen to your music while jogging? Pay extra for “traveling” privileges. Do you want to have a dance party at your house? Everyone besides you must “pay” for the right to listen to the dance music. Oops, someone extra showed up to the dance party who didn’t pay.... now you lose the right to listen to the song(s) forever, you pirate!

7) Perhaps the console, even one as powerful as the XBox One/PS4, is outdated. Seriously, nothing about either console sounds so revolutionary that it changes the face of gaming. What, possibly, can either console give us that we aren’t already enjoying, except higher polygon counts? It’s hard to imagine that the games themselves will be that much different than what’s already available (i.e.more FPS games). As old as the current XBox360 and PS3 are, they still seem relevant. They still have plenty of life in them yet. They’re still selling, and they’re still cool. Are not all these “cool” features of the upcoming consoles just gimmicks for gimmicks’ sake, like the Wii-U controller? And, are consumers willing to shell out 50+ dollars a game anymore when smartphone games sell at a fraction of that price? Especially if they can’t resell it?

I have many more thoughts, but I’ll save them for another time.

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