Can anyone recommend good Av/Switch Selector for various game consoles?

12 replies [Last post]
retroc64
Offline
Joined: 05/11/2008

There are so many on Amazon. Is there one that is particularly good?

Thanks guys,

Ck

TripHamer
TripHamer's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/31/2010
I use to keep my systems all connected.

I have my 360/ps3/ps2 all connected to my living room tv. But all my older systems are on a cart and I'll connect them only when I want to play them. Classic systems stay in their containers till I want to take one out and play with it for a while.

My days of multi switches and daisy chaining them together are over. :)

n/a
Mark Vergeer
Mark Vergeer's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
PAL

My situation and solution is rather PAL centric. Vivanco powered RGB switches are the way to go really.

n/a
davyK
davyK's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/21/2006
The downstairs gaming TV has

The downstairs gaming TV has the Wii and Dreamcast set up while all my other "junk" is upstairs connected to a CRT via various means.....

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Probably...
retroc64 wrote:

Wow, your advice is gold. I didn't realize that keeping them plugged-in can wear them out a little. I will probably keep the older systems on a different extension, and keep it off from the extension end. It sounds like you play the newer systems much more than the older systems.

Well, if you think about it, the newest systems do lots of things that everyone in the family can enjoy. Play music, play videos/Netflix, play apps, etc., in addition to all the game stuff. In that way, it just makes more sense to have those active and ready on the main TVs at all time (at least for us), plus new stuff is constantly being released for them (on the Xbox 360, for instance, I like to download each and every Xbox Live Arcade demo, and on the PS3 side, I like to download each new PlayStation Plus freebie). Also, the more systems you have, the less time you have for any one of them. That's the downside to having varied interests and a large collection. That was my point with trying to get some of the most important classic systems ready to go, so I could use them more.

n/a
retroc64
Offline
Joined: 05/11/2008
Advice is GOLD!

Wow, your advice is gold. I didn't realize that keeping them plugged-in can wear them out a little. I will probably keep the older systems on a different extension, and keep it off from the extension end. It sounds like you play the newer systems much more than the older systems.

Bill Loguidice wrote:
retroc64 wrote:

Great advice. I really appreciate it. How many systems do you have hooked up at a time?

I know certain guys on here - Mark Vergeer included - like to have multiple (mostly classic) systems hooked up at all times. It is something of an art. Personally, I've gotten away from that mindset. The only time I have multiple systems hooked up is for the latest and greatest systems. For example, on the main floor TV, I have an Xbox 360, PS3, Vizio Co-Star, and Nintendo Wii (in addition to the sound system, cable box, Vulkano, etc.), all hooked up over HDMI, except for the Wii, which is component. I have an HDMI with audio return channel on my TV and sound system, so I can hook the 360, PS3, and Cable box/Co-Star into the sound system and just have the sound system go back to the HDMI ARC port on my TV. The Wii is hooked up to the TV's component input, which then can pass through the sound system over the ARC. Once the Wii U is released, I'll probably put the Wii U on the TV's second HDMI input to make it work with all that, and retire the Wii to the basement TV. That's pretty much the mindset--cycle in the latest stuff, cycle out the outdated stuff.

The basement TV has an Xbox 360, PS3 and OnLive console. All of those are hooked into the TV's HDMI inputs. I then have the TV's optical audio output going to my surround sound system. Again, relatively easy and straightforward.

On the upstairs TV, I just have an Xbox 360.

Anyway, the point is, I've had switches in the past that have worked just fine, but remembering what is on what has been difficult. I've tried to keep things as simple as possible these days and use various Logitech remotes (they're programmable from a computer) to control everything. One press of a button and it does all the necessary switching.

Anyway, you have to keep in mind that every system plugged in is always drawing a little power, even if it's off. This is not good for the longevity of the system or your electricity bill, though it is certainly convenient. I have a spare room, so I'm able to compromise on that idea, which I've described here: http://www.armchairarcade.com/neo/node/4882 . Basically, I have the systems ready to go at any time, but only plug them in on demand.

I plan on doing something similar with the most important classic consoles I have that I did with the most important classic computers. The difference is is that I will most likely put them on a Sony 32" CRT TV, so I will likely use one of the many passive switches I have to switch between them. I'll then either power on the power strip or plug them into AC power on demand. Again, it all requires lots of planning and thought.

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Not much help, but this is what I do...
retroc64 wrote:

Great advice. I really appreciate it. How many systems do you have hooked up at a time?

I know certain guys on here - Mark Vergeer included - like to have multiple (mostly classic) systems hooked up at all times. It is something of an art. Personally, I've gotten away from that mindset. The only time I have multiple systems hooked up is for the latest and greatest systems. For example, on the main floor TV, I have an Xbox 360, PS3, Vizio Co-Star, and Nintendo Wii (in addition to the sound system, cable box, Vulkano, etc.), all hooked up over HDMI, except for the Wii, which is component. I have an HDMI with audio return channel on my TV and sound system, so I can hook the 360, PS3, and Cable box/Co-Star into the sound system and just have the sound system go back to the HDMI ARC port on my TV. The Wii is hooked up to the TV's component input, which then can pass through the sound system over the ARC. Once the Wii U is released, I'll probably put the Wii U on the TV's second HDMI input to make it work with all that, and retire the Wii to the basement TV. That's pretty much the mindset--cycle in the latest stuff, cycle out the outdated stuff.

The basement TV has an Xbox 360, PS3 and OnLive console. All of those are hooked into the TV's HDMI inputs. I then have the TV's optical audio output going to my surround sound system. Again, relatively easy and straightforward.

On the upstairs TV, I just have an Xbox 360.

Anyway, the point is, I've had switches in the past that have worked just fine, but remembering what is on what has been difficult. I've tried to keep things as simple as possible these days and use various Logitech remotes (they're programmable from a computer) to control everything. One press of a button and it does all the necessary switching.

Anyway, you have to keep in mind that every system plugged in is always drawing a little power, even if it's off. This is not good for the longevity of the system or your electricity bill, though it is certainly convenient. I have a spare room, so I'm able to compromise on that idea, which I've described here: http://www.armchairarcade.com/neo/node/4882 . Basically, I have the systems ready to go at any time, but only plug them in on demand.

I plan on doing something similar with the most important classic consoles I have that I did with the most important classic computers. The difference is is that I will most likely put them on a Sony 32" CRT TV, so I will likely use one of the many passive switches I have to switch between them. I'll then either power on the power strip or plug them into AC power on demand. Again, it all requires lots of planning and thought.

n/a
retroc64
Offline
Joined: 05/11/2008
Awesome info

Great advice. I really appreciate it. How many systems do you have hooked up at a time?

Bill Loguidice wrote:
retroc64 wrote:

I have a PS3, PS1, GameCube, Wii, Dreamcast on it's way, and hopefully more soon. I have no idea how to do all this rather than buy a new television.

Thanks for your help.

P.S. I heard that Nintendo made a version of the Wii that doesn't haven't compatibility with the GameCube. Is that true?

First, yes, the most recent versions (the past year or so) of the Wii do not have GameCube support. You'll have to make sure you get an older model, which shouldn't be too hard. Look for model RVL-001, one of the white bundles with Wii Sports in it, or, whether or not it has the four GameCube controller ports on it. The newer versions also have the Wii logo printed horizontally, which may be the easiest way to tell when one is not compatible.

As for the switch, you don't need to get too fancy unless you need HDMI for the PS3. There are excellent passive switches that mix composite, S-VIDEO, and component on a five or greater switch (here's an example: http://www.amazon.com/Universal-System-Selector-Pro-Sony-PSP/dp/B0001GAY..., as well as here: http://www.amazon.com/Universal-Joytech-CONTROL-S240-Nintendo-Wii/dp/B00... ). Some require power, some don't. It may be a little tougher to find these these days, but Amazon or eBay should turn something up with the right mix of stuff you'll need. Your needs may ultimately be relatively simple, and you may only need a switch with a few inputs. The key is to figure out how you want to hook each system up and what inputs will be available on your TV.

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Depends...
retroc64 wrote:

I have a PS3, PS1, GameCube, Wii, Dreamcast on it's way, and hopefully more soon. I have no idea how to do all this rather than buy a new television.

Thanks for your help.

P.S. I heard that Nintendo made a version of the Wii that doesn't haven't compatibility with the GameCube. Is that true?

First, yes, the most recent versions (the past year or so) of the Wii do not have GameCube support. You'll have to make sure you get an older model, which shouldn't be too hard. Look for model RVL-001, one of the white bundles with Wii Sports in it, or, whether or not it has the four GameCube controller ports on it. The newer versions also have the Wii logo printed horizontally, which may be the easiest way to tell when one is not compatible.

As for the switch, you don't need to get too fancy unless you need HDMI for the PS3. There are excellent passive switches that mix composite, S-VIDEO, and component on a five or greater switch (here's an example: http://www.amazon.com/Universal-System-Selector-Pro-Sony-PSP/dp/B0001GAY..., as well as here: http://www.amazon.com/Universal-Joytech-CONTROL-S240-Nintendo-Wii/dp/B00... ). Some require power, some don't. It may be a little tougher to find these these days, but Amazon or eBay should turn something up with the right mix of stuff you'll need. Your needs may ultimately be relatively simple, and you may only need a switch with a few inputs. The key is to figure out how you want to hook each system up and what inputs will be available on your TV.

n/a
retroc64
Offline
Joined: 05/11/2008
NTSC
davyK wrote:

What's the connection type? Are you in PAL land? I have an excellent powered RGB SCART switch.

There is a later version of the Wii with no GC compatibility

NTSC-US. :-)

davyK
davyK's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/21/2006
What's the connection type?

What's the connection type? Are you in PAL land? I have an excellent powered RGB SCART switch.

There is a later version of the Wii with no GC compatibility

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.