Making My Collection Usable - Part I - The Classic Computers (photos)

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Bill Loguidice's picture

As mentioned previously, I've been re-thinking my collecting activities, including selling off the non-working and duplicate portions of my collection, which presently consists of over 430 videogame and computer systems and countless thousands of related software, accessories, and literature. Naturally, part of that reasoning was "thinning the herd" after all these years, because - even though I am thankful to have a relatively generous amount of space for these types of activities - it has long since reached the point where I well and truly have too much to handle. Why has this become an issue? There's simply too much stuff, there's no time to use it (that would need to be my full-time job), and, when I do want to use it, it takes up most of my available time just setting something up, only to have to break it down and put it back on the shelf again. It's innefficient, and frankly, no fun anymore.

With that in mind, in addition to the thinning - which will take a very, very long time of course in a collection I've been cultivating for over 30 years now - I've been plotting how I can make better use of what I have. Like I said, I am thankful to have a relatively generous amount of space. I have a large basement area, with about half unfinished, which is used for storage, and the other, finished half, consisting of an office room, hallway, workout area, and den area. The main floors of our house contain our active systems, including the Xbox 360, PS3, Wii, Co-Star, various computers and handhelds, etc., but they are not an option for me to make use of for classic items, other than on an occasional basis. That just leaves the basement, which is, of course, fine, but also limits my flexibility.

Anyway, even though each area of the basement is brimming with stuff and each section serves a specific purpose, either on a permanent or temporary basis, I decided that my best course of action is to pull out the truly must-have-accessible systems from the hundreds available and make them accessible at a moment's notice. This was not easy to do, as I have a genuine passion for each and every system I own, but the bottom line is is that some systems are more interesting, more "useful," or I simply have a critical mass of items for them that they can't be ignored. I decided I'd tackle that task with my classic computers first, followed by my classic videogame systems at a later date. I cleared space on my big L-shaped computer desk in the office area and proceeded to select the systems that met my criteria and would fit on the desk (I'll have some flexibility when I set up the classic videogame consoles to make a little use of the den area as well).

While I have many different models in most of the specific computer series I selected, I tried to choose the one model in my collection that would give me the most bang-for-the-buck. This in and of itself was not easy, as there's rarely a "most perfect" choice when it comes to choosing the ideal model in a series, which in this case also involved being a good fit for the available space. The systems I chose were as follows: TI-99/4a, Apple IIgs, Atari 600XL, Atari Falcon, Commodore Amiga 2000HD, and Commodore 128DCR, with a special appearance by the Radio Shack Color Computer series, which I'll explain at the end. So yeah, as hard as it was, no Sinclair Spectrum, BBC, IBM PCjr, Coleco Adam, Imagination Machine, MSX, Interact, Exidy, etc., etc., items, even though I'd love to have those out and ready to go as much as the others.

My initial goal - which I was able to accomplish - was to set up a basic system configuration for each and make sure it was working properly. I actually had a slightly different mix of specific systems, but, after testing, found some things didn't function as expected or didn't work at all. Over time, I'll add to each system I've set up (and address the other stuff that's not working) until each and every one is set up properly with their respective disk drives, flash cards, transfer cables, etc., to be fully usable with all of the stuff I have available. At the very least, with these minimum configurations, they're ready to go for most quick usage scenarios. I also decided it was important not to have any of them plugged in full-time, so everything gets hooked up and powered up on demand. This is actually simple and will not delay my usage in any way. In fact, the way I have the various monitors and TV's set up, I can hook up other systems as needed without too much fuss, which is another bonus. Anyway, here are the photos and additional explanation:

IMG_2239
So the first system I set up is perhaps the clumsiest, the TI-99/4a. I decided to go with the classic silver/black model rather than the later cream colored unit, but that will be easy enough to swap out as the mood suits me. The big unit is the Peripheral Expansion Box, or PEB, which houses extra memory and the two disk drives. It's a beast, but necessary. I have a flash unit for this device that I'll set up, as well as other peripherals, but for now, this will suffice in terms of usability. That's one of three 1084S monitors you'll see, and the TI-99/4a is connected through its monitor output. There should be enough room here for me to add a composite modded Atari 7800 or ColecoVision next to it when I do the videogame stuff and make additional use of the same connection.

IMG_2241
This is a ROM 01 Apple IIgs. Amazingly, the battery still keeps the time and date, but I haven't opened it up in a long time to see if there are any mods to make that possible (the original batteries only lasted five years or so). I initally had a ROM 03 IIgs here, but it was choking on the 5.25" disk drives for whatever reason and I decided to stop troubleshooting and just use this model. I was debating about putting one of my Apple IIe computers here instead, so I'd have a bit more flexibility with the internal slots and better overall legacy compability, but this setup does afford me access to most of the legacy stuff as well as all the IIgs stuff, so IIgs it is for now. It's hooked up to its companion monitor via its RGB connector. I'll add in things like the CCFA at a later date, but for now, this setup works just fine. I'll see about swapping ROMs with the other unit as well at a later date, if needed.

IMG_2243
I have a fondness for various Atari 8-bit models for various reasons - the uniqueness of the 800, the feel of the 1200XL, etc. - but I decided to go with my 600XL for its nice size. It's also modded for monitor output and 64K, so it doesn't have the usual 600XL drawbacks, and I even have a small dongle that pushes the memory many times that. I'll need to add a disk drive here for compatibility, but I do have various flash options that will be added into the mix. This is hooked up to the LG LED TV/monitor through the monitor output (composite).

IMG_2236
Behind the 600XL is the Atari Falcon, shown in the photo above during testing. I knew I wanted an ST-series system and had most of them (including the STacy), at my disposal, but I thought I'd go with the top available unit and take my chances on legacy compatibility. It has 14MB of RAM and all kinds of SCSI-drives, which are not hooked up at present. I'm using Atari's VGA adapter to go the LG. It looks fantastic, though I may use the same type of SCART to HDMI conversion I'm doing with the Amiga since I should be able to control the sound output better that way.

IMG_2237
I'm not going to lie, this one was a bit disappointing. I tried both an Amiga 600 and Amiga 1200 here, and couldn't get either one to work properly (or at all), even after much troubleshooting. Those systems would have been ideal because I have a wonderful compact flash card with all of the Amiga software on it that would have made these a dream to use. Unfortunately, that will have to wait. Of my remaining Amiga systems, the 500, 1000, etc., this 2000HD was the next best choice, and it even has an 8088 bridge card in it, so I have the added advantage of some classic PC DOS compatibility for a bit more flexibility. Overall, it's still a nice system and a worthy choice. I'm using a SCART to HDMI conversion, which looks great on the LG.

IMG_2245
The last system in the "always available" line-up is the Commodore 128DCR. I have many systems in the C-64 series, but this particular unit is by far the most flexible. It's hooked up over both the monitor and RGB outputs to the 1084S, so I can switch between 80 column and 40 column modes without issue. I also have various flash-based solutions that I'll get going on this as well.

IMG_2247
This is the Color Computer stuff in the center of the room on its own desk, though you can't really see everything, including the additional systems. I'm working on a Color Computer history book at the moment and there's no better place for a wild card system that I'll need front and center for the next several months than right here. The main CoCo 3 will be hooked up to the 1084S with an RGB cable, so it should also look great. This is next on my list to test and organize, so it can prove its value when writing.

IMG_2248
This is the one other available table in the room. It has ancillary Color Computer stuff - offshoots and near compatibles and what-not. This is part of the process of getting all of my CoCo-related collection (except the boxed software, which remains with the other boxed computer software in racks in the hallway) out. Obviously, I have some duplicates to sell here.

So, that wraps up part 1. I'll try to provide some updates over time, and am now planning on what classic consoles I absolutely need out and/or can fit somewhere. Collecting like this is obviously not for the feint of heart - or particularly sane - but I ultimately enjoy it, so you take the hassle with the fun...

Comments

retroc64
Offline
Joined: 05/11/2008
Would never leave
Bill Loguidice wrote:

I'm also open to visits...

Bad move ... I would never leave! LOL!

There is obviously something to owning rather than emulating, but for machines you don't plan on ever using, emulation is probably good enough.

When was the busiest time in your 30 years of collecting that you were most active? Also, how many Commodore 64 and Atari 8-Bit software do you own?

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Comments
retroc64 wrote:

There is obviously something to owning rather than emulating, but for machines you don't plan on ever using, emulation is probably good enough.

When was the busiest time in your 30 years of collecting that you were most active? Also, how many Commodore 64 and Atari 8-Bit software do you own?

Strictly only boxed software, on the Atari 8-bit, about 200 pieces, and on the C-64 side (and only C-64, no 128, Vic-20, Plus/4/C-16, PET, etc.), over 280 pieces.

My busiest collecting time has probably been in the past 10 years, which coincided with the rise of eBay and the rise of my own personal finances... I've been collecting since childhood in the 1980s, though, so it's more a non-stop accumulation thing...

n/a
retroc64
Offline
Joined: 05/11/2008
Probably Missed It!

I probably missed it but do you have pictures of your collection room as a whole, not a closeup of the games or systems themselves?

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Stuff
retroc64 wrote:

I probably missed it but do you have pictures of your collection room as a whole, not a closeup of the games or systems themselves?

Nothing recent. Most of my collection is in my basement's storage area, with a lot of the boxed computer software on racks in the hallway, then there's the stuff now in the basement office. The rest of the house, including the basement den, family room, our bedroom, etc., have a few things here and there. I'll take a tour video/photos again in the near future when it makes sense.

Here are the systems/platforms I have at present:
3Com Palm IIIx
Acorn BBC Micro Model B (The BBC Microcomputer System)
Acorn Electron
Amazon Kindle
Amdek PC
Amstrad CPC6128
Amstrad CPC6128
Amstrad GX4000
Amstrad PPC640
APF Imagination Machine
APF Imagination Machine
APF Imagination Machine
APF M1000
APF M1000
APF MP1000
APF MP1000
Apple IIc (2c)
Apple IIc (2c)
Apple IIe
Apple IIe Platinum
Apple IIGS
Apple IIGS
Apple iPad 2
Apple iPad 2
Apple iPhone 4
Apple iPhone 4
Apple iPod Nano 16GB
Apple iPod Nano 16GB
Apple iPod Photo
Apple Mac Mini
Apple Mac Mini
Apple Macintosh LC III
Apple Macintosh Performa 6115CD
Apple Macintosh Powerbook 170
Apple Macintosh SE FDHD
Arcade Retro Collecting Multiple Classic Computer (MCC-216)
Arcadia Corporation Supercharger
Archos 7 (6700)
Asus EeePC 1000HE
AT&T PC 6300
Atari 400
Atari 400
Atari 800
Atari 1040STe
Atari 1200XL
Atari 130XE
Atari 2600 Jr
Atari 2600 Video Computer System (VCS)
Atari 5200 SuperSystem
Atari 5200 SuperSystem
Atari 520STFM
Atari 600XL
Atari 7800 ProSystem
Atari 7800 ProSystem
Atari 800XL
Atari Falcon030 Computer System
Atari Flashback 2
Atari Flashback 2+
Atari Flashback 3 (Atgames)
Atari Flashback 4 (Atgames)
Atari Jaguar
Atari Jaguar CD
Atari Lynx (Model 1)
Atari Lynx (Model 2)
Atari Portfolio
Atari Stacy 2 (STacy 2)
Atari Video Pinball
Atari XE Game System (XEGS)
Atari XE Game System (XEGS)
Bally Professional Arcade (Astrocade)
Bally Professional Arcade (Astrocade)
Bally Professional Arcade (Astrocade)
Briel Computers Altair 8800 Micro
Briel Computers Micro-KIM
Briel Computers PockeTerm
Briel Computers replica 1
Cambridge Computer Z88
Character Group Who Wants to Be a Millionaire Plug & Play
Cingular 8125 Pocket PC
Coleco Adam
Coleco Adam
Coleco ColecoVision
Coleco ColecoVision
Coleco ColecoVision
Coleco ColecoVision
Coleco ColecoVision Expansion Module #1 (Atari 2600)
Coleco Pac-Man
Coleco Telstar Alpha
Coleco Telstar Arcade
Coleco Telstar Arcade
Coleco Telstar Marksman
Commodore 128 (C-128)
Commodore 128 (C-128)
Commodore 128DCR
Commodore 16 (C-16)
Commodore 64 (C-64)
Commodore 64 (C-64)
Commodore 64c (C-64c)
Commodore Amiga 1000
Commodore Amiga 1200
Commodore Amiga 2000HD
Commodore Amiga 500
Commodore Amiga 600
Commodore CD32
Commodore CDTV (Amiga CDTV)
Commodore PET (original keyboard version), 2001-8
Commodore Plus/4
Commodore Plus/4
Commodore Plus/4
Commodore SuperPET (SP9000)
Commodore SuperPET (SP9000)
Commodore SX-64
Commodore SX-64
Commodore VIC 20 (Vic-20)
Commodore VIC 20 (Vic-20)
Compaq Deskpro
Cyberpower GUA290
Cybiko Wireless Entertainment System
Cybiko Xtreme
Cybiko Xtreme
Dell Dimension 8400
Dell Inspiron One 2305 Touch
Dick Smith Wizzard (VTech CreatiVision)
Dick Smith Wizzard (VTech CreatiVision)
Dick Smith Wizzard (VTech CreatiVision)
Dream Authentics Excalibur
dreamGEAR Plug 'n' Play 50 in 1
EB Excalibur Fox Sports Football Key Chain
Emerson Arcadia 2001
Emerson Arcadia 2001
Entex Arcade Defender
Entex Space Invader
Epoch Cassette Vision
Epoch Super Cassette Vision
Epson HX-20
Epson HX-20
Epson HX-20
Epson PX-8
Exidy Sorcerer
Exidy Sorcerer (PAL)
Fairchild Channel F System II
Fairchild Channel F System II
Fairchild Video Entertainment System (VES)
FC Mobile FC Mobile II
Franklin ACE 1200
Gadgets Small, Inc. Spectre GCR
Game Sporz TV Wireless Boxing
GamePark Holdings GP2X F-200
Gateway CX210X Tablet PC
GCE Vectrex
GCE Vectrex
General Mills Shark Tale Oscar and Angie (General Mills promo)
Generic Generic PC
Generic Generic PC
Generic Pocket Arcade 256 Games in 1
Generic Talking Brick Game 118 in 1 - E-118T
GenMobile GenMobile
Gold Leopard King (GLK) GLK Book Education Computer M08
Heathkit HERO JR RT-1
Hewlett-Packard HP TouchPad
Hewlett-Packard HP TouchPad
Hewlett-Packard HP TouchSmart IQ524
Hewlett-Packard HP-85
Hewlett-Packard HP-85
Hewlett-Packard Pavilion dv9812us
Hewlett-Packard Pavilion ze4430us
IBM 5155
IBM PC 5150
IBM PC 5150
IBM PCjr
IBM PCjr
IBM PCjr
Intelligent Game MPT-03 Home Entertainment Centre
Intelligent Game MPT-03 Home Entertainment Centre
Intelligent Game MPT-03 Home Entertainment Centre
Interact Home Computer System (Model "R" - 16K)
Interact Home Computer System (Model "R" - 16K)
Interact Home Computer System (Model "R" - 16K)
INTV Corp. Intellivision III
Jakks Pacific Dora the Explorer TV Game
Jakks Pacific Namco TV Games
jojoultimate Mini Universal Supergun (SuperGun, super gun)
Kaypro Kaypro 4 (Kaypro 4 '84)
Kaypro Kaypro II
Kaypro Kaypro II
Kaypro Kaypro II
Kellog Xbox Ninja House (cereal promotion)
Konami Konami Live Online Game Controller!
Konami Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Laser 128 EX/2
Leapfrog Leapster2
Leapfrog Leapster2
Lego Robotics Invention System 2.0
LG Shine CU720
Magnavox Odyssey
Magnavox Odyssey 300
Magnavox Odyssey2
Magnavox Odyssey2
Mammoth Toys Commodore 64 30 Games in One Joystick!
Mammoth Toys Commodore 64 30 Games in One Joystick!
Mattel Aquarius
Mattel Aquarius
Mattel Aquarius
Mattel Aquarius (Radofin version)
Mattel Baseball
Mattel Enhanced Computer System (ECS)
Mattel Enhanced Computer System (ECS)
Mattel Enhanced Computer System (ECS)
Mattel HyperScan
Mattel HyperScan
Mattel HyperScan
Mattel Intellivision II
Mattel Intellivision II
Mattel Intellivision II
MBR Control Dynamics S-100 Bus Chassis
Memorex Spongebob Media Player
Memorex Video Information System Player (VIS)
MFJ Video Effects Titler 1480B
MGA Entertainment Centipede
MGA Entertainment Hulk
MGA Entertainment Pac-Man
MGA Entertainment Spider-Man 2
Microsoft Xbox
Microsoft Xbox 360
Microsoft Xbox 360
Microsoft Xbox 360 Slim
Midway TouchMaster 5000
Milton Bradley MBX Expansion System
Milton Bradley Microvision
Milton Bradley Microvision
Motorola Razr V3
Multitech Micro-Professor 1 (MPF-1)
Navman PiN Pocket PC
NEC Mobile Pro 750C
NEC PC Engine Super Grafx
NEC PC-6601
NEC PC-8001A
NEC PC-FX
NEC Turbo Duo
NEC Turbo Express
NEC Turbo-Grafx 16
Nintendo 3DS
Nintendo 3DS XL
Nintendo 64 (N64)
Nintendo DS
Nintendo DS
Nintendo DS
Nintendo DSi
Nintendo DSi
Nintendo DSi
Nintendo e-Reader
Nintendo Family BASIC Computer
Nintendo GamCube Game Boy Player
Nintendo Game Boy
Nintendo Game Boy Advance
Nintendo Game Boy Advance SP
Nintendo Game Boy Color
Nintendo Game Boy Pocket
Nintendo GameCube
Nintendo Nintendo Enterainment System (NES)
Nintendo Nintendo Enterainment System (NES)
Nintendo Super GameBoy
Nintendo Super Nintendo (SNES)
Nintendo Super Nintendo (SNES)
Nintendo Tetris
Nintendo Virtual Boy
Nintendo Wii
Nokia 6820
Nokia 6820
Nokia N-Gage QD
Ohio Scientific Challenger 1P
OnLive OnLive Game System
OnLive OnLive Game System
Osborne Executive (OCC-2)
Osborne Osborne 1 (OCC-1)
Packard Bell Platinum
Palm Z22
Panasonic FZ1 3DO Interactive Multiplayer
Panasonic FZ1 3DO Interactive Multiplayer
Panasonic JR-200U Personal Computer
Panasonic JR-200U Personal Computer
Panasonic JR-200U Personal Computer
Panasonic JR-200U Personal Computer
Panasonic RL-H1400 HHC
Philips CDI 220
Philips CDI 350
Philips CDI 490
Philips Videopac G7200
Philips Videopac+ G7401
Pioneer LaserActive
Pro Tech Video Game System
Radica Sega Menacer
Radica Space Invaders
Radio Shack Color Computer
Radio Shack Color Computer 2
Radio Shack Color Computer 3
Radio Shack Color Computer 3
Radio Shack Color Computer 3
Radio Shack MC-10 (Micro Color Computer)
Radio Shack MC-10 (Micro Color Computer)
Radio Shack MC-10 (Micro Color Computer)
Radio Shack TRS-80 Pocket Computer (PC-2)
Radio Shack TRS-80 Pocket Computer (PC-4)
Raspberry Pi
RCA Studio II Home TV Programmer
RCA Studio II Home TV Programmer
Royal (TA) Alphatronic PC (CP/M)
Sager NP8760-S1
Samsung Blackjack II Smartphone
Samsung Blackjack II Smartphone
Samsung DVD-N501 (Nuon)
Sears Video Arcade (Tele-Games)
Sega 32X
Sega CD 2
Sega Dreamcast
Sega Dreamcast
Sega Dreamcast
Sega Game Gear
Sega Game Gear
Sega Genesis 2
Sega Genesis 2
Sega Genesis Arcade Classic (Atgames)
Sega Genesis Classic Game Console (Atgames)
Sega Genesis I
Sega Genesis Ultimate Portable Game Player (Atgames)
Sega Master System I (SMS)
Sega Nomad
Sega Nomad
Sega Saturn
Sega SC-3000 Computer
Sega SC-3000H Computer
Sega SC-3000H Computer (Yeno version)
Sega Shadow Grinder (McDonald's promo)
Sega Sonic's Speedway (McDonald's promo)
Sega Unknown McDonald's promo LCD 1 (sealed)
Sega Genesis Gopher (Atgames Firecore Portable Player)
Senario 101-in-1 Video Game
Sharp Twin Famicom
Sinclair QL
Sinclair ZX Spectrum
Sinclair ZX Spectrum +2
Sinclair ZX Spectrum +3
Sinclair ZX80
Sinclair ZX81
Sinclair ZX81 (custom)
SNK Neo Geo Advanced Entertainment System (AES)
SNK Neo Geo Pocket Color
Sony CD-I CD Interactive Intelligent Discman IVO-V11
Sony HB-75P
Sony HB-F1XD
Sony PlayStation (PS1)
Sony PlayStation 2 (PS2)
Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3)
Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3)
Sony PlayStation Portable (PSP)
Sony PlayStation Vita
Sony PlayStation Vita
Spectravideo CompuMate
Spectravideo SV-318
Spectravideo SV-328
Spectravideo SV-328
Spectravideo SV-328
Spectravideo SV-328
Tandy 1000
Tandy 1000 EX
Tandy 1000 SX
Tandy 1000 SX
Tandy 1000 TX
Tandy 2000 HD
Tandy Model 100
Tandy Model 102
Tandy Model 200
Tandy TRS-80 Model 4
Tandy TRS-80 Model 4
Tandy TRS-80 Model 4P
Tandy TRS-80 Model 4P
Tandy TRS-80 Model I
Tandy TRS-80 Model I
Tandy TRS-80 Model III (parts only)
Tano Dragon
Tano Dragon
Tano Dragon
Tano Dragon
Tano Dragon
Tapwave Zodiac 2
Team Ubi Ubi
TeleGames Personal Arcade DINA 2 in One
TeleGames Personal Arcade DINA 2 in One
Texas Instruments Compact Computer (CC-40)
Texas Instruments Compact Computer (CC-40)
Texas Instruments TI-58 (TI Programmable 58)
Texas Instruments TI-74 BASICALC
Texas Instruments TI-74 BASICALC
Texas Instruments TI-99/4a
Texas Instruments TI-99/4a
Texas Instruments TI-99/4a
Texas Instruments TI-99/4a
Texas Instruments TI-99/4a
Texas Instruments TI-99/4a
Tiger Game.com
Tiger Game.com
Tiger R-Zone
Tiger Telematics Gizmondo
Timex Sinclair 1000
Timex Sinclair 1000
Timex Sinclair 1500
Timex Sinclair 2068
Timex Sinclair 2068
Timex Sinclair 2068
Tomy Tutor 16K Computer
Tomy Tutor 16K Computer
Toy Quest Go Go TV Video VISION
Toy Quest Go Go TV Video VISION
Toymax Activision TV Games
Twinhead Durabook
Unisonic Champion 2711 Series
Valentin Angelovski Flea86 (rev 2.1, prototype)
Velleman Classic TV Game (MK121 NTSC)
VideoBrain Computer Company VideoBrain Family Computer Model 101
View-Master Interactive Vision
Vizio Co-Star Stream Player
Vtech I.Q. Unlimited Computer
Vtech I.Q. Unlimited Computer
Vtech Laser 310 Color Computer
Vtech Laser 50
Vtech Laser PC5 (PC-5)
VTech Socrates Educational Video System
VTech V.Smile Motion Active Learning System
VTech V.Smile TV Learning System
VTech Laser (VTL) VZ200 (VZ 200, VZ-200)
Watara Supervision
Worlds of Wonder Action Max
Worlds of Wonder Action Max
XaviX XaviXPORT
Yamaha CX-5M II/128U Music Computer (MSX 1)
Yamaha CX5M Music Computer (MSX 1)
Yamaha CX5M Music Computer (MSX 1)
Yobo Gameware FC Game Console
ZAPiT Games Game Wave
Zenith Z-100 (ZF-120-xx All-In-One Computer)

n/a
retroc64
Offline
Joined: 05/11/2008
Amazing

Wow, can't wait for that video.

Bill Loguidice wrote:
retroc64 wrote:

I probably missed it but do you have pictures of your collection room as a whole, not a closeup of the games or systems themselves?

Nothing recent. Most of my collection is in my basement's storage area, with a lot of the boxed computer software on racks in the hallway, then there's the stuff now in the basement office. The rest of the house, including the basement den, family room, our bedroom, etc., have a few things here and there. I'll take a tour video/photos again in the near future when it makes sense.

Here are the systems/platforms I have at present:

clok1966
Offline
Joined: 01/21/2009
do a search there is a thread

do a search there is a thread with quite a few pictures, worth hunting down its amazing to take a look at all that.. even if its just pictures and not all of its on the,.

shane knapp (not verified)
hacking the CoCo 1

i just put together how far back i've been overclocking and modding systems...

in one article of hot coco, they mentioned the famous "poke 65495,0" overclock command. i used it liberally when doing sound or graphics demos for science projects!

however, the computer was overheating. again, hot coco to the rescue! there was an article about overheating while overclocking, and it told you to epoxy a home-made aluminum heat sink to one of the processors. my dad and i took it further: we bent our own cooling fins on a piece of stock aluminum and then swiss-cheesed the case with a hole saw for better cooling. that made my 10-year old self ecstatic!

sadly, no pictures exist of this awesomely modded beast. :(

to this day, i overclock and do crazy cooling: my current machine has 3/4 gallon of racecar coolant keeping the cpu cool! i owe it all to my lowly coco 1. :)

Oscar Arthur Koepke (not verified)
Problems with your Commodore Amiga

Hi there Bill(I am an old buddy from TS2068 yahoo group)!

The most common problem that makes all Commodore Amiga's models from working to non-working from night to day is the need to replace all the eletrolytic capacitos inside the units(Yeah all of them seem to leak and destry the pcb if leeks for a long time). The problem is very normal in all models from the A500,A1000,A2000,A600 and A1200;

Contac your best mantainment techincal guy to make these fixes for your group of Amigas, and keep in mind that the same problem can happen to all other PC you have, since most of them have more than 20years...

Regards,

Oscar

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Thanks, Oscar. When time

Thanks, Oscar. When time permits, I'll probably open them up to take a look. My testing was also incomplete as well. For now, the Amiga 2000HD will do, but I definitely want to get the CF cards going in at least the 1200, if not both the 600 and 1200.

n/a
Yorman Collado (not verified)
IM SELLING CONSOLE INTELLIGENT GAME MPT-03

Dear Friend.
First of all a warm greeting.
I write because I have a game console intelligent mpt-03 which is in perfect condition, in box as new despite being over 30 years.
But I'm selling as I am in Venezuela is difficult for monetary control there aca sell in dollar or euro.
I read that you buy this type of games.
Comentame please if your interest is.
If you want to send me an email to send photos of the console
Thank you very much for your time and excuse my English ...

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