A new smartwatch I just backed on kickstarter...

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Bill Loguidice
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Pebble: E-Paper Watch for iPhone and Android: http://kck.st/HumIV5

I got the jet black one. I'm a sucker for smart watches and the pre-order price was just too good to pass up. Right now I change off on two watches, one an iPod Nano with a black strap and the other an oversized Casio G-Shock with many different features. There's still no perfect smartwatch or smart accessory (Jawbone Up, Nike Fuelband, etc.), but they're getting better. I consider these mobile phone companions more than dedicated devices these days, though obviously something like the Casio G-Shock with zero phone interfacing has a different purpose (for me, specifically underwater and overly rugged activities)...

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Matt Barton
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I imagine people who did

I imagine people who did contribute to the kickstarter will probably feel really proud of their watch. ;) Probably talk like they helped invent the darn thing.

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Shawn Delahunty
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Getting even bigger

The Pebble watch just got a feature article in the Tech section of ABC news:

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/pebble-watch-smartwatch-iphone-android/...

I really kick myself for not pledging to grab one earlier, though I am really more interested in the developer-level tools and what might be possible with the thing, rather than just the watch itself. I suspect version #2 will offer a lot more on-board hardware gizmos that can be tapped by devs.

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Bill Loguidice
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Sony has that companion watch

Sony has that companion watch out now, but it only works with Android and supposedly is rather buggy. I think people are rather more optimistic over the Pebble watch, which will cost $150 each outside of the Kickstarter.

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clok1966
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I see SONY has one of these

I see SONY has one of these out already in Japan, it wasnt comming to US, but now is.. bit fancier (color) but I think color is going to be hard to see outside.. funny i saw it in Popular Mechanics.. it was in cool tech area.. with the caption something like "but why, when you have a phone that does it all in your pocket already" glad I'm not the only one who thingks that way... its $139 and not $100

Bill Loguidice
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Pebble Watch

Completely sold out with 8 days still to go: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/597507018/pebble-e-paper-watch-for-i...

What's amazing is that they blew past the $10 million mark, have no more offers available, yet they're still receiving incentive-less "donations." They really hit the jackpot with this one.

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clok1966
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could be
Matt Barton wrote:

I think a Quest for Glory, King's Quest, or Gabriel Knight kickstarter would have a much stronger shot.

not a huge fan of the game style, but i thought i read (maybe here?) one of the main people behind Quest for glory was making somthing on Kickstarter and if all went well it had plans for new Quest for glory games.. Hmm all the talk about revisting a past great game.. Lots of those old Serria click (my name for um) games I passed over. I played Kings Quest, and FUll throttle, the first indy, and a couple of the Space Quest ones... i do find it strange I really liked Indy and the Full throttle one.. but had less love for the others.. just a quicrk in my genes.. i guess. even the early Text games.. Zork, plantfall,and.. once i cant remeber.. played um but never much cared for um past that.

opps bill beat me to it i think his link to Jean is the one I saw or heard about.

Bill Loguidice
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Kickstarter
Matt Barton wrote:

I think the LSL story exemplifies that...Not enough people REALLY want a new LSL game. Why not? I don't know. I know there's a big fan base for Larry, but I'm sad to say that the awful recent Larry games probably tarnished the brand to the point of no return.

I think a Quest for Glory, King's Quest, or Gabriel Knight kickstarter would have a much stronger shot.

I think the "problem" with the LSL one was that it wasn't enough of a new game. All it had to be was a truly new entry in the series and I think it would have easily been more successful than it was. With that said, it reached its funding goal, so I guess it ultimately didn't matter: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/leisuresuitlarry/make-leisure-suit-l... . I think a new Quest for Glory would excite people, as would a Gabriel Knight--I think the former could be a remake with modern technology though and still work, the latter would probably be in a similar boat as LSL. Obviously, King's Quest has been redone multiple times, so I think that would HAVE to be a new entry in the series. Here's Jane Jensen's Kickstarter, by the way, which is already a success: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1005365109/jane-jensens-pinkerton-ro... . I guess as long as these get funded, there's really no negativity associated with even re-treading tired old ground, but I do think we'll reach a point with straight up remakes where these will start to be just shy of funded, then not funded much at all.

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Matt Barton
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I'm fast becoming a believer

I'm fast becoming a believer myself. I was of the opinion that only "big names" would have a shot at it, but there have obviously been successful projects from people who aren't exactly household names. It's looking like a well-planned project with the right presentation--that fills a vital niche--has an excellent shot at glory.

I think the LSL story exemplifies that...Not enough people REALLY want a new LSL game. Why not? I don't know. I know there's a big fan base for Larry, but I'm sad to say that the awful recent Larry games probably tarnished the brand to the point of no return.

I think a Quest for Glory, King's Quest, or Gabriel Knight kickstarter would have a much stronger shot.

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clok1966
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yes, i think I sorta missed

yes, i think I sorta missed my point in all my blathering... its not that I think kickstarter is bad in any way.. but its built on the people who use it, abuse it, and the people who support it.. And I will try to keep this short as i go so willy nilly I miss my point sometimes (as proved above) Kickstarter as a enity is a GREAT idea.. but the people.. they will decide.. and not in a good way (maybe I have to little faith in people as a whole).. the vocal people, the press will latch onto the "bad" part and it will get far more exposure then the good, and that will ruin it.. Example, pick any product ( washing machine) hit eopinions.. reviews ona website.. most are people with problems.. not always becuase they have problems.. but 10,000 mcahines 100 break, 100 people complain on forums.. 9,900 have great luck, but since nothing was the matter they didnt cruise forums for help, list the problems, they didnt say "great machine".. they had no reason to.. so the perception is its junk, every post is about a problem!..

Bill Loguidice
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Well, yeah, Clok, it's

Well, yeah, Clok, it's definitely early days for Kickstarter and we don't know the long-term viability. Several projects haven't panned out already, of course, and it appears that there's no real recourse when you kick the money in if delivery is not what you expected or was promised (or if anything gets delivered at all). These failures haven't been publicized to a great degree because the stakes to this point have been relatively low. Now that we have Kickstarters regularly getting into hundreds of thousands of dollars and some of course even multi-millions, once one of those fails in one of many ways (lack of delivery, sub-par delivery, etc.), that's when there will be a true backlash. However, that will also be the opportunity for Kickstarter to refine the model.

I think the model itself - the core idea - is solid and people clearly like it, it's now just a matter of crossing the t's and dotting the i's to make sure that both the creator and contributor is sufficiently protected. Perhaps that could take the form of a type of insurance policy Kickstarter applies to each Kickstarter that crosses a certain threshold, where the contributor gets back a certain percentage of what they put in in case there's a failure of delivery or some other negative outcome (not what they expected). Whatever the case, this new type of model clearly has risks and has some needed refinement, but it may ultimately wind up being like investing in a company on the stock market - you could lose your shirt or reap the rewards - and it may simply come down to the creator asking for the money being a safe enough investment. The reality is we buy products all the time that we're not happy with post purchase and if it's something not returnable, we simply don't get our money back. It's not like we don't participate in any capitalism after that. There's risk in everything.

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