My first game, where should I start?

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Earthman155
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Joined: 01/24/2012

Okay, so let me tell you what I have done so far. I have started learning C and will continue to do so, taking one step at a time. What I want to know though is, can I actually make a game with C or would I have to use C++ or Java? Because I really don't want to waste my time on something that I don't really need, even though I know C is similar to C++ or Java.

Also, I don't really know how to make sprites or anything like that, so if anyone could link me to a guide or just tell me some quick tips on how to make sprites, that would be great! I cannot afford Photoshop, so I guess I would have to use Paint.NET. And for music, can I use the music from Newgrounds? It is free and I would just have to make an advertisement in my games credit or something. For sound effects too, where could I get them? I can make some of them myself, but some more advanced ones would be pretty hard to make I presume, mainly because I use a $15 microphone.

Thank you for reading this and thanks in advance for any help.

clok1966
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Joined: 01/21/2009
interesting
Tobop wrote:

Hi everyone. My 1st post :D

I am currently making a few games in Unity 3D. However, I am not a coder as such.
The newest free version of Unity is great & can use C# and Java at the same time.

I've created an ebook of how to get the 3D meshes textured, rigged & animated for Unity3d or UDK. (Fxb files)

http://tobop.com.au/TDownloads/LampBug_11.pdf
(right click & save as to get the file, instead of opening in browser if you wish)

I know it needs to be updated, I'm learning new things all the time.
I am learning code with BurgZergArcade, and purchased his RPG code, which has been extremely useful.

http://www.youtube.com/user/BurgZergArcade
I've downloaded every part of the 'Hack&Slash' tutorial. Over 40gbs of awesomeness XD

Here's the progress of Super Inframan:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAExUpK7f60
(Inspired by the review, done by James Rolfe, (The Angry Video Game Nerd)

Review:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYu1baU26uQ

I've also got some other developments which will hopefully be awesome too! But I can't mention them all, at the moment :)

Checked out the Youtube stuff pretty impressive for a first try. Thouhg i must admit as a movie nut im not fermiler with Inframan.. but i did hear he was an offshoot ( or match) ofr Ultraman :) nice work.

Tobop
Tobop's picture
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Joined: 03/05/2012
Indie games ftw!

Hi everyone. My 1st post :D

I am currently making a few games in Unity 3D. However, I am not a coder as such.
The newest free version of Unity is great & can use C# and Java at the same time.

I've created an ebook of how to get the 3D meshes textured, rigged & animated for Unity3d or UDK. (Fxb files)

http://tobop.com.au/TDownloads/LampBug_11.pdf
(right click & save as to get the file, instead of opening in browser if you wish)

I know it needs to be updated, I'm learning new things all the time.
I am learning code with BurgZergArcade, and purchased his RPG code, which has been extremely useful.

http://www.youtube.com/user/BurgZergArcade
I've downloaded every part of the 'Hack&Slash' tutorial. Over 40gbs of awesomeness XD

Here's the progress of Super Inframan:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAExUpK7f60
(Inspired by the review, done by James Rolfe, (The Angry Video Game Nerd)

Review:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYu1baU26uQ

I've also got some other developments which will hopefully be awesome too! But I can't mention them all, at the moment :)

n/a
davyK
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Joined: 05/21/2006
C, C++, Java - it won't

With third generation general purpose languages (3GLs) like C, C++, Java - it won't really matter which you choose. C++ and Java are quite similar as they are object oriented (OO) languages. Some people would say you should start on an OO language. OO does seem to lend itself quite well to game programming as it organises code around object types and how different objects interact - quite a good fit for action games. Many modern languages are OO so it makes sense - but you will have to get your head around OO as a concept - which actually might be easier for a beginner with no pre-conceptions coming from a procedural language background.

However a procedural language like C or some game related languages like DarkBASIC or BlitzBASIC will produce equally great results. Game related languages have their own graphics and sound statements for you to use and they can hide a lot of the complexity of graphics while giving you better control than "game maker" type environments. You will need to buy one of these though they aren't expensive (C, Java etc. tools are free).

Starting with a 3GL you will have to spend quite a bit of time on the basics. You would have to create a very basic "game" using just character output or using very basic graphics routines that might be built into the language. These would be little experiments - never meant to be released to looked at. Then you would pick your first proper game. Then you would pick one of the many free libraries of routines for graphics and sound that currently exist - noone would start from scratch except for very advanced folk who are going to write their own engine or library for others to use. You would have to invest time in learning a library - and maybe revisit one of your experiments and give it a graphical coat of paint - then move onto your real game.

Learning a 3GL and writing a game will take time but it is very rewarding.

Re graphical assets- its not a bad idea to just create very simple shapes to start with. Once the mechanics of the game are going you can then add in better images - maybe get someone to work with who has the talent. Then the polishing would start getting all the little effects just right that separate the amateurs from the pros (assuming of course you have got the mechanics and design of a sufficient quality!!!)- how long you spend on this will determine how shiny the finished product will look. Didn't Cave Story take something like 5 or 6 years?

Matt Barton
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Joined: 01/16/2006
Gamemaker is the way to go

Gamemaker is the way to go for guys like us without pro experience or training. There are plenty of included sprites to work with. Once you have a game up and running with the included sprites, you can always customize it later.

I wouldn't even bother trying to make my own sprites until I had a game working in Gamemaker.

Sound effects are everywhere on the net. There are a lot of shill sites out there, though, claiming to be free but are not really. Gamemaker does come with a lot of sound fx that will probably cover all the bases unless you want something really specific.

Music is the same. You can make your own, but easier to find free songs online. Just make sure you're searching for "royalty free music."

n/a
Nathaniel Tolbert
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Joined: 11/06/2010
Depending on what kind of

Depending on what kind of game you want to make there are plenty of free tools out there you can use. If you want something on the level of Photoshop without the photoshop price, there is always GIMP. Paint.NET is nice but it is lacking some of the functionality from what I understand. The first task it to lock down the type of game you want to make. Once you have locked down the type of game you want to make, then you need to decide whether you want to build the engine for the game from the ground up or use a free, pre-made engine that is available freely on the internet. Gamemaker (http://www.yoyogames.com/) has a free version that contains a set of tools that will work well for a lot of types of games. If adventure games are your thing, there's always Adventure Game Studio (http://www.adventuregamestudio.co.uk/) to make your game. I wouldn't recommend using music from Newgrounds as a large section of that music is copyrighted and can cause headaches. Music, although difficult to start with, can become a great experience to create with the right tools. Garageband on the Mac is a great tool for music creation, and there is a program like it on Windows called MixCraft. I have wanted to do something like this myself, but I am not skilled with anything enough to be able to create something functional.

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