Jeepney Jeepers: All-Original Retrogame from Myth Core Productions

Matt Barton's picture

Jeepney Jeepers: Multiball FTW!Jeepney Jeepers: Multiball FTW!Armchair Arcade is pleased to present Jeepney Jeepers, the all-new game from Myth Core Productions, designed and programmed by Matt Barton with comics and graphics by Elizabeth Barton.

Aliens have landed in southeast Asia, and the only thing standing between THEM and humanity is...one man and his jeepney. Are you brave, fast, and just plain dumb enough to snap on that space-age laser prototype and defend the earth? Of course you are! So get your butt in that jeepney, yup!

  • An homage to classics block-busting games like Arkanoid and Breakout but with a crazy twist!
  • Blow up blocks, roast the invaders, rescue your fellow humans and--above all else--get to the last level and take on the awesome might of THE GORFINATOR
  • Collect upgrades and unleash the unbelievable block-busting power of the five-pronged MULTIBALL
  • Bust that crit bubble for the amazing SUPERBALL
  • Bounce up them balls as much as YOU want, no more, no less
  • Feelin' lonely? Bust out those poor little refugees for fun, fame, and profits
  • Get the energy boost powerups and ram right through the blocks with your jeepney
  • Surrounded? Don't panic, make THEM panic with your amped up car horn
  • Twelve colorful levels with an awesome retro-arcade inspired boss fight
  • Compete with friends and family for the honor of the High Score table
  • Why ain't you playing this already?

Download this sweet mama right now!
JEEPNEY JEEPERS (version: 1.04b)

And if you enjoy playing this game, please leave us a comment below. It's man and womandatory.

Comments

clok1966
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Joined: 01/21/2009
fun
Rowdy Rob wrote:

My life's goal is now to be the first person whose name is not "Matt Barton" to beat "Jeepney Jeepers."

if it wasnt for a Pre load of Skyrim last night and closing my door as soon as work end today at noon for some Elder scrolls addiction I would race you..

I must admit I figured i would have beat it too ( got sidetracked by Matts mayham on the webpage) and yes.. looking at other gammaker games.. so far most are just not that impressive..
But for insperation, take a look at this one (only after you have beat Jeepeny Jeepers) http://sandbox.yoyogames.com/games/51922-gauntlet-revisited

I must admit gamemaker can do some pretty awsome stuff.

Matt Barton
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Hehe, you guys are great. I

Hehe, you guys are great. I hope you do get inspired enough to try to make your own games so we can start comparing notes and building up some knowledge here. I'm still fuzzy about collisions even after all this time...So many aspects you have to consider.

I know what I'd love to do next...Actually have three ideas. One of them is easy to code, but getting the right content will be tricky. The other is math-heavy so I'm not even sure where to start....But would be awesome if I could pull it off.

I want put a few more feathers in my cap before tackling my second true CRPG. Yeah, I say second 'cuz I'm taking credit for one I did back with Visionary on the Amiga when I was a kid: Grym's Adventure. lol!

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Rowdy Rob
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Joined: 09/04/2006
Game creation advice. And "the fire."
Matt Barton wrote:

Hehe, you guys are great. I hope you do get inspired enough to try to make your own games so we can start comparing notes and building up some knowledge here. I'm still fuzzy about collisions even after all this time...So many aspects you have to consider.

You have indeed inspired me to get into Gamemaker (again), Matt. I spent a great deal of time yesterday going through the tutorials (again) and trying to (re)learn Gamemaker.

My MAIN problem is that I seem to have lost that creative edge that I used to have. If tools like Gamemaker came out 15 years ago, I have no doubt I'd be a game making fool! Like most of you, I've had a bazillion serious ideas for game designs, but programming in anything other than line-numbered Basic seems to just send my brain into meltdown! Heck, pretty much any minor stumbling block stops me dead in my tracks anymore, when before I would have fought my way through it, guns blazing, if I really was "on fire." "I'll get back to it later," I'll tell myself, but later never comes.

I've decided that I MUST break through this mental block. How can *I* claim to be a creative guy if I'm not creating anything?!!?! In the past, I've done some rather amazing stuff, if I say so myself. Game graphics (both 2D and 3D), minor programming of graphics and utilities.... heck, I've even wrote some listenable music mods back in the Amiga days! I found ways to push the Atari 8-bit beyond what it was supposedly capable of, and I pushed the boundaries of the Amiga also! And I created the most amazing SEUCK game that nobody's ever seen (with parallax scrolling, power-ups, etc.). I pushed the boundaries not only of the software/platforms I was using, but I pushed the boundaries of my own self in the process.

Now that I have every tool that I could ever have dreamed of.... nothing. It's all right there, but has my fire been put out for good? I'd hate to think that my age has killed off my creative drive.

Yes, I know this sounds more like "mid-life crisis," defeat, or laziness rather than "creative drought," and so I'm probably in the wrong place to ask for advice. BUT, how do you push yourself past these mental hurdles, Matt? While you are obviously highly intelligent, creative, and productive, you don't strike me as the programmer type; yet, here I am, playing your games!

I'm dabbling in Gamemaker now, but I'm actually conflicted between developing in Gamemaker or Unity (or both), and it's the programming aspect (GML, Unity/Javascript) that stumbles me on both. The Unity interface doesn't intimidate me because of my past experience with 3D programs, i.e. I'm home on Unity.

The HTML5 troubles you've been having with Gamemaker somewhat concerns me. I know that Unity has a rather excellent web plug-in, plus it can be used to develop for other platforms (PC, Mac, iOS, Android, consoles, etc.). Yet, Gamemaker is clearly simpler to start developing 2D games, because it has an "icon-driven" programming interface for the less demanding game concepts.

My first Gamemaker game that I'm working on is, ironically, a knock-off of an old game that surprisingly hasn't been "knocked-off" before to my knowlege. I know it's not pushing any creative bounds, but it's a relatively simple concept that I believe I can accomplish within the bounds of Gamemaker. Most of my "real" ideas are too grandiose to attempt right now.

I suppose I am asking for advice for myself, but I KNOW that many (most?) AA members are also budding game designers also. I'm sure any general advice would be helpful to everyone. Probably the most fundamental factor in creating games (or pursuing any endeavor) is "drive," and you have it in spades, Matt.

All I know is that I want "Rowdy Rob" back. I need to regain my superpowers, and perhaps this Gamemaker thing could be a step in the right direction. In the past, I've been supportive of various AA projects in dark times. Maybe AA can give general advice helpful to everyone (particularly me) on breaking through these hurdles and getting back "the fire."

Matt Barton
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Bring it, Rowdy Rob!
Rowdy Rob wrote:

All I know is that I want "Rowdy Rob" back. I need to regain my superpowers, and perhaps this Gamemaker thing could be a step in the right direction. In the past, I've been supportive of various AA projects in dark times. Maybe AA can give general advice helpful to everyone (particularly me) on breaking through these hurdles and getting back "the fire."

I find that I am most creative when I work from the inside out. What I mean is that instead of sitting down with pen and paper and trying to conceive of something original, I just go into the tool and start playing around, trying to find out what's possible to do...I might look at some tutorials or start trying to do something simple. Jeepney Jeepers began as an idea for a CRPG combat engine. I wanted to see if I could make a spinning dial like in Fable instead of having to rely on random rolls for things like hit and power. Then I watched a Michael Palin travel documentary and learned about Jeepneys. Suddenly I was like, "Hm...Why not make this a Jeepney game?" I already knew how to do the block destruction stuff, but the hard part was making the car move around in anything like realism. One I had the basics down, other ideas became obvious, such as having refugees to pick up. The aliens are probably the least original, but you can't get hung up on stuff like that. Just go with what works.

In short, my advice would be to open up Unity or Gamemaker and start playing with it. What's easy to do, what's not possible at your current level of knowledge, what's impractical, etc. Once you get a handle on what's actually feasible, then you can start thinking of features you'd like in your game and get to work. I guess it'd be like a painter not coming to the canvas with a fleshed out picture in mind, but rather just experimenting with brush strokes, brush types, colors, etc., playing around and around until finally the inspiration hits. When you stumble upon a good technique and realize that you CAN achieve a vision, you tend to have the energy to want to see it fulfilled. For me the real fun is figuring out stuff works, thinking up something potentially fun and then trying it out to see if it plays well.

The advice I've found most useful is to smart small. Incredibly small. I make a little checklist of the most basic components, such as just having an object on screen that you can move around. Check. Move on to the next challenge, such as having it bump up against objects. If you see the game as a series of little challenges like that, it's a lot easier than if you go in whole hog.

It sounds like you have experience with SHMUPs, so you might start there. Once you have the basic engine built, you can start tacking on more features and experimenting with ideas to find something different. For instance, you could go the Thexder or Xenon route and combine platforming and shmupping. That'd be relatively easy to do in Gamemaker. Or you could make the ship a helicopter instead and play around with those physics. I've been sorely tempted to try to make a game like Fort Apocalypse, since I enjoyed it and the unofficial remake Spaceport for Amiga. You could add some power-ups and destructible terrain and really have something cool.

In any case, parallax scrolling is drop dead easy with Gamemaker. I'm confident I could design a straightforward scrolling shooter in a matter of hours assuming I was content with existing game assets and was going for 15-20 minutes of gameplay (about right IMO for a browser game). There are tons of free sprites and sounds and such for shmups out there, so no reason not to get started.

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Rowdy Rob
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Getting the hang of Gamemaker
Matt Barton wrote:

In short, my advice would be to open up Unity or Gamemaker and start playing with it. What's easy to do, what's not possible at your current level of knowledge, what's impractical, etc. Once you get a handle on what's actually feasible, then you can start thinking of features you'd like in your game and get to work.

Thanks for the advice, Matt! It was very helpful and inspirational.

Believe it or not, I have much of the base mechanics of my game working in Gamemaker already! Luckily, I have a very simple game concept I'm working on (based on an old early-80's game), so it wasn't as hard as I imagined to get it going. It turns out I didn't even need GML to do it (yet).

Matt Barton wrote:

The advice I've found most useful is to smart small. Incredibly small. I make a little checklist of the most basic components, such as just having an object on screen that you can move around. Check. Move on to the next challenge, such as having it bump up against objects. If you see the game as a series of little challenges like that, it's a lot easier than if you go in whole hog.

That's pretty much what I did: start VERY small. It turns out that the built-in tutorials are not that helpful (the "scrolling shooter" tutorial is so confusing I damn near gave up!). Actually, the first tutorial was very helpful, but after that, I decided to just go for it and learn while doing. It turns out this was a much more effective way to learn Gamemaker (for me) than to fight through the confusing tutorials. I wish I had tried this approach sooner! I'm not abandoning tutorials altogether, of course. In fact, I'm referencing a couple from the YoYoGames site right now. But diving right in seems to work better than just following a straight tutorial (for me).

Even starting small, I still had to figure out how to do what I wanted using the iconic programming system. It's powerful, but you still have to think in "programming" mode. It was kind of like working a puzzle. But it's exhilarating to see your program when it's running! That's a feeling I haven't felt in a long time.

Matt Barton wrote:

I'm confident I could design a straightforward scrolling shooter in a matter of hours assuming I was content with existing game assets and was going for 15-20 minutes of gameplay (about right IMO for a browser game). There are tons of free sprites and sounds and such for shmups out there, so no reason not to get started.

My first project is not a scrolling shooter, but seeing how Gamemaker operates, I can definitely see how a simple shooter could be thrown together quickly. Heck, Gamemaker is hardly more complex than SUECK when it comes to simple SHMUPs!

I may in fact attempt a recreation of my old SEUCK game next, seeing that I still have a lot of the original sprites I designed for it. I'm trying to resist the temptation to get super-ambitious with my game concepts until I feel reasonably competent in Gamemaker.

As for my current game, I want to get it working as a basic clone of the original game, then take it much further! We'll see how it goes, but I think it's going well right now. GML still intimidates me, though. :-(

Thanks again for the inspiration, Matt! I'm feeling great right now after a day of "coding."

EVERYONE ELSE --- GET CRACKING ON YOUR GAMEMAKER GAME!!!

Bill Loguidice
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I noticed your comments about

I noticed your comments about the limitations of GML, Rob. You may already be familiar with it, but check out how sophisticated you can get with GameMaker:

Swords and Sorcery - Underworld GOLD edition

I think that and Matt's examples prove that you should "Just do it!" and not overthink it. Better to accomplish small things and get a process down for accomplishing big things, plus you have something to show for your efforts much, much quicker, which is always helpful.

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clok1966
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Joined: 01/21/2009
My main block when doing

My main block when doing creative stuff is my scope. We all dream big, after all this is our Idea's they are BIG :)

I can plan for months, as a programmer I'm used to long range planning, planning ideas and not only looking at what they will do, but if done how will it effect the long run. Mu current gamemaker project (again I blame matt! for renewing my interest too, like he did for you). I have every enemy mpped out, HP/armour/dmage/rate of fire, death.. etc.. My player avatar can just sit on screen and do nothing, and I have reasons why the game wont let him. I have ever level mapped out (city, forest, hedges, etc) with boss type at end. Its pages of documentation.. I have about 3/4 of the sprite work done..

and almost no gameplay. And my frutration level has increased with my brief test of HTML5.. I would NOT use it right now, most features simply do not work. If you are doing a straight SHUMP then maybe.. but some slight complexity its just not ready for. I do think it will be sometime in the future, and as said, simply being such a cross platform idea it will get notice. But the extra frutrations are not worth it to me (right now).

I have since settled down and have my player moving on placeholder levels and small progress goes a LONG way to keeping my interest going. Progress is a great motivator, even if its small, its still progress. I do think Matts idea of just playing around and making it do stuff is the way to go. My specific ideas are slowing me down.. and you dont learn alot coping somebody elses work to do what you want.

unfortnatly Skyrim has derailed me.. i complain so many games have hours of play.. now i ahve one that im 20 hours in and havent even dented it.. in fact i like it so much I started a different class from scratch.

Start small, do wierd stuff, once you see results you will be amazed at how much more fun it is.

Matt Barton
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I'm looking forward to

I'm looking forward to Skyrim. Still hasn't come yet even though I pre-ordered it..Guess if you don't do the upgraded shipping they take their sweet time, pretty much defeating the purpose.

I've run up against a nasty stumbling block in my latest game project. I went back to trying to do the ramping rescue game, but I'll be DAMNED. I figured out the basics of moving a character up and down slopes, but the physics of ramps and such....forget about it. You really do need a good physics engine to do what I need...There is one called GM Physics, but it's in "pre-beta," whatever that means, and the instructions are nil.

It's really frustrating to have a clear vision in your head of what you want to accomplish, but simply lacking the skills and/or tools to do it. I hate giving up...Man, I hate it...But just can't do this without outside help.

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Rowdy Rob
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GameMaker talk: Bill, Clok, and Matt
Bill Loguidice wrote:

I noticed your comments about the limitations of GML, Rob. You may already be familiar with it, but check out how sophisticated you can get with GameMaker:

I didn't mean to imply that GML was limited. I, too, have seen some very good games programmed in Gamemaker. I just find the scripting language to be obscure. When I tried to tackle it back in the day (a couple of years ago?) my mind just couldn't wrap itself around the syntax. This holds true for just about any of the modern programming languages; the odd syntax just intimidates me. Heck, the very sight of a curly bracket (i.e. " } ") just shuts my brain down. I have trouble even typing it!

I do recall getting somewhat accustomed to it back then, but I hated it. It just doesn't feel natural to me. I guess the time has come to face that obstacle and beat it. After all, other people are doing it, so how hard could it be?

Bill Loguidice wrote:

I think that and Matt's examples prove that you should "Just do it!" and not overthink it. Better to accomplish small things and get a process down for accomplishing big things, plus you have something to show for your efforts much, much quicker, which is always helpful.

Even the most basic thing about my current project is baffling me. I thought I had already conquered it right off the bat, but it turns out the objects go haywire if I speed them up! And objects speeding up is critical to the game! I've already thought of a more complex solution, but even that is fraught with potential pitfalls.

Unfortunately, weeknights are difficult for me to work on projects like this. I've hardly touched the project since the weekend. It's too late to start tonight... sigh...

clok1966 wrote:

My main block when doing creative stuff is my scope. We all dream big, after all this is our Idea's they are BIG :)

Even as I work on my current "simple" project, I'm getting other "big" game ideas. They actually seem within reach now. But, the game I'm working on now MUST be completed.

Matt Barton wrote:

It's really frustrating to have a clear vision in your head of what you want to accomplish, but simply lacking the skills and/or tools to do it. I hate giving up...Man, I hate it...But just can't do this without outside help.

I saw your more detailed post in the other thread, and man, I wish I could help you. I'm actually surprised that there aren't car physics plug-ins for Gamemaker, given its popularity. It appeared that the "ramp" programmer was using vector shapes rather than bitmapped sprites for his demo, so even if you plugged the code into your game, it probably wouldn't do you much good if your intent is to use bitmaps.

Being that your "car" will consist of at least three separate objects (two separate tires and one car body) attached to each other, you're talking about some serious math programming. Not only will you have to work out various forces on each object, then have to work out the interrelation of forces between those objects!

Are there any "motorcycle" games like "Kikstart" available in Gamemaker with code examples? It sounds like that's what you're basically trying to do, physics-wise.

Matt Barton
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Kickstart is exactly what I

Kickstart is exactly what I was going for with that one...But sadly gotta shelve it. There are definitely hard limitations you run up against when you don't have decent math skills, and my are horrible.

Of course my very next project was a "Thrust" style game...Man, I LOVE physics games with thrust and inertia and so on...But just plum ignorant when it comes to the math of it all. I might tinker with it some more because I love my concept, but looks like I'm going to get mired again...

Here's what I feel comfortable I could actually pull off given my current gamemaker skills--

1. A Mancopter-style game. This one is a lot easier than it seems. Just a question of "why bother?" I don't really know what I could add to the original other than different graphics and music and such. Of course I could also do a Joust style game even quicker, though what would be the pull? I'm really opposed to just "remaking" something unless I can come up with a novel spin. Yet I am tempted simply because the game does have such a nice mechanic that hasn't been remade to death.

You know, I was just thinking that Mancopter is the only game I know where the screen scrolls from right to left.

2. A Ft. Apocalypse style game. Again, nothing here I can't do right now. Again, the problem is more "why bother?" I can't think of a good enough twist on these games to make it really unique. Indeed, it's already been done with Spaceport on the Amiga, if you remember that one. Still, rare enough that I'm guessing many people might be new to it.

3. Tile-based RPG. As long as there are no 3D dungeons involved, I see no reason I couldn't pull this off. I even understand the math involved :). It might be fun to try to pull of a Wizard's Crown style game, with the big complicated battles. My biggest hesitation here is that I know I'd want to get very detailed with the story and combat elements, and probably end up spending months (years?) on something that a dozen folks would play at best. I have a feeling I'd get all into it and then burn out after a few weeks.

4. Lunar Lander/Thrust type game. I've worked out the basics, though nothing like the advanced thrust games where you can pick up stuff and swing it around on a pendulum. But I've got a lander type prototype that moves around just like a lander, with applying thrust and such. Pretty fun mechanic, but not enough in itself (IMO) to entertain beyond a few minutes. If I could work out the pendulum motion this might be worth pursuing combined with a breakout type element.

My ultimate dream at this point would be to make a Goldbox style game, though with updated graphics and interface. As long as I'm living in lala happy fantasy ville, I'd want animated 3D characters and tons of custom animation so the battles looked like miniatures duking it out. :)

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