Micro Adventurer (Magazine) Part 1

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Chip Hageman's picture


It's time for another influx of retro gaming magazines... This time we have a short lived UK gaming magazine called Micro Adventurer. The series was put out by Sunshine Books and featured a mere seventeen issues between November 1983 and March 1985. Still, it's a great bit of gaming nostalgia and certainly worth adding to your collection.

This is the first eight issues in Comic Book Reader <.cbr> format. So, if you don't already have a viewer.. now's the time to grab one. You can also try ComicRack... some people seem to prefer it instead. It's the iTunes of the comic reader world (read: bloated and slow) ;).

Enjoy,
-Chip

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sascha (not verified)
You can also just unpack the

You can also just unpack the cbr because its' just a zip file and view the images, or better, make a PDF of it.

Bill Loguidice
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Processing
sascha wrote:

You can also just unpack the cbr because its' just a zip file and view the images, or better, make a PDF of it.

Indeed, I have 7zip at work and it makes short work of extracting it. I then use Adobe Acrobat to combine it into a PDF, then add it into my Evernote magazine archive.

Thanks again, Chip!

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Carmine
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These fascinates me. I love

These fascinates me. I love print and I'm sad to see it's on its way out the door along with literature. What fascinates me more is hearing somebody say itunes is bloated and slow. I've always hated it and want to know why it sucks.

Bill Loguidice
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iTunes - Not really for power users
Carmine wrote:

These fascinates me. I love print and I'm sad to see it's on its way out the door along with literature. What fascinates me more is hearing somebody say itunes is bloated and slow. I've always hated it and want to know why it sucks.

iTunes is a poor performer, particularly when it comes to searching or refreshing the store. With that said, it's a necessary evil in my opinion, as it's clearly an ideal way for non-technical people to get at all types of content easily. I don't particularly care for it, but I use it because I have iOS devices and it's just easier to standardize on what works natively with those. Also, once you wrangle it, it at least does what you want it to (e.g., it makes it easy for me to subscribe to podcasts and control what episodes go on my device(s) and when).

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Matt Barton
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Amazing, Chip. I don't mind

Amazing, Chip. I don't mind CBR since I used it quite frequently to read comics.

Anyway, from what I hear the print industry isn't hurt nearly as badly as you'd think. Book sales are still quite high. I'm not quite sure about magazines; I noticed that Rolling Stone (which my wife has subbed to for several years) was a big giant thing up until a few years ago, then it went to regular mag size. Now it's getting noticeably thinner. I doubt it'll ever tank completely, but it's a bit sad to see that giant-sized mag shrink down to a skeleton.

I sub to Wired, which is probably my favorite mag at the moment. It's still pretty meaty with relatively few ads, which I guess means that it's making most of its revenue from subscribers. The mags that have to depend on impulse purchases are probably taking the worst punishment. Some of the worst are pretty much mostly ads with skimpy articles.

I had to laugh at one called Woman's World (somebody puts their old copies in the workout room). I looked at the cover, and EVERY article was advertising pseudo-science (miracle diets, remedies, astrology, etc.) Also displayed prominently was "God Bless America," which I assume is there to appeal to good ol' Republicans. The only "legit" article was one about making some kind of jack o'lantern cupcakes for Halloween (which kinda conflicts with all the diet mongering?). What a sad, scary world those poor ignorant readers must inhabit.

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Bill Loguidice
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Pricing model
Matt Barton wrote:

I sub to Wired, which is probably my favorite mag at the moment. It's still pretty meaty with relatively few ads, which I guess means that it's making most of its revenue from subscribers. The mags that have to depend on impulse purchases are probably taking the worst punishment. Some of the worst are pretty much mostly ads with skimpy articles.

I doubt that. Most of their subscriptions are $10 for the year. I think like many publications today, subscriptions are a loss leader and everything else is made up in advertising. The more subscribers you have, the more you can charge advertisers. Take what Christina does for a living--she heads up medical journals. Not a single one of them charges a subscription fee. These publications are mailed to doctors/nurses/hospitals/etc. for free. It's more important to have x number of subscribers so you can charge advertisers the maximum amount of money for inclusion in the magazine. All costs (employee salaries, pay to freelancers, stipends for reviews, printing, shipping, etc.) come solely from advertiser dollars. I bet it's just about the same for trade publications, albeit getting *some* revenue from subscriptions.

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Carmine
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Thanks Bill that was really

Thanks Bill that was really good info on itunes.

You guys don't think e-readers and online news culture and blogging will eventually reduce print to a small niche? I feel like it's going that way but I really hope it doesn't. I just talked to the owner of my local borders and he said they were going under because they were too late to the e-reader scene. I'm sure his $45 blu-rays didn't help either...

Bill Loguidice
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Print versus Digital
Carmine wrote:

You guys don't think e-readers and online news culture and blogging will eventually reduce print to a small niche? I feel like it's going that way but I really hope it doesn't. I just talked to the owner of my local borders and he said they were going under because they were too late to the e-reader scene. I'm sure his $45 blu-rays didn't help either...

Even though I am clearly a technophile and spend an obscenely large portion of my "fun money" on technology of one sort or another, I still have some old world biases, and that includes having a preference for physical books and magazines. With that said, I have dabbled in e-Readers before (specifically a few from Sony) - before selling them due to some frustrations - and will again attempt to embrace "digital reading" once I get an iPad 2 (I'm getting tired of adding the "2"). I was again attempting to read Carl Sagan's Cosmos in bed last night, and it once again struck me how uncomfortable it can be to hold a book open and turn the pages, etc., while snuggled in bed, particularly when the book is a bit of an odd size. So while there's nothing quite like a print publication, there are definite downsides. The other downsides are related to storage. I have a poor track record of carving out time to read magazines and books. I literally have several dozen that I need to read, with a giant bag of magazines in bedroom and a large pile of books. Certainly having a digital reader (in my case, the iPad) will allow me to cut down on the clutter and perhaps allow me more time to read, since I can usually have that device with me. This is especially good for a serial reader, like me, and one at that who likes to go back and forth between different books as my mood changes (on my night-stand right now are the aforementioned Cosmos book and the Charles Schulz biography--I'm only about halfway through both after all this time).

A more pragmatic problem for the print industry is that people are reading less (at least if you don't count the Web) and all associated costs with print production are high. Without a substantial audience, they simply can't survive, so it really is adapt to the digital world or die. So in that regard, print already is a niche. Books don't sell like they used to. There are far fewer magazines than ever before. Newspapers are on their last legs. Etc. By adapting to a digital medium - while there won't be the same feel as traditional print - it can at least survive and prosper, thanks in no small part to the tremendous reduction in the costs of creation and distribution. There's also the overlooked side effect that if the content is more easily available (digitally), more people will partake, so we could actually see a reversal of the "people just don't read anymore" trend.

With all of that said, print will not go away in our lifetimes. I really believe that. But it may be like vinyl records are today--not produced much, but prized by enthusiasts when it is.

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Carmine
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I'll take it
Bill Loguidice wrote:

With all of that said, print will not go away in our lifetimes. I really believe that. But it may be like vinyl records are today--not produced much, but prized by enthusiasts when it is.

I believe it too honestly. And I'll take it. If I have to be the old guy with his exceptionally strong book-holding arms and his hardcover book collection so be it.

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