Amazon has Nintendo 3DS Pre-orders Open Now!

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clok1966
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Well I must admit as the

Well I must admit as the owner of a 3D tv (when purchased I didnt know it had it) I got a pair of glasses on closeout about 6 months ago. the simple fact with TV's right now is: there is nothing to watch in 3D.. a couple (and I actually mean you can count them on your fingers) movies is about it. My glasses came with Monsters Vs Aliens (actually pretty fun in 3D). I looked for more stuff back when I picked it up and there was simply nothing.. I would guess there is more now. I looked at some 3D PS3 games, but tacked on 3D is sorta.. ah.. like tacked on Wii mote controls (as in stuff added to game that is just ther to use teh wi mote,Im not talking all WII games), it doesnt add anything to a game not made for it. 3D and TV viewing must not be catching on as there is nothing to adopt for early adopters.
A system made 100% for 3D, if the game makers use it in some meaningfull way should be pretty sweet.

Bill Loguidice
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Well, it's true that $250

Well, it's true that $250 buys a lot of stuff, but the 3DS is purely a luxury item (entertainment). As was stated earlier and we've stated many times before, as long as you get the equivalent entertainment value from your purchase, it was worth it. Over the life of the product, it will be easy to get $250 worth of entertainment out of it and then some.

With that said, I think I probably would have waited on ordering if it was anything except 3D. It's something I've always be an enthusiast of and I simply refuse to buy a 3D TV at this point, so this is my compromise. Otherwise I would have been happy to wait for an enticing bundle, sale or hardware revision. That's why I've been able to hold off on buying a tablet. There was no particular technological desire or other need on my part and there are missing features. I'm actually happy to wait until iPad 2 or a good Honeycomb tablet.

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TripHamer
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When you put it that way....
Bill Loguidice wrote:

Here is the historical list of handheld console prices at launch that's been making the rounds. The important one to look at is the inflation adjusted numbers (and disregard the Virtual Boy as that doesn't belong since that's a transportable console like the Vectrex, not a handheld): http://www.gamespot.com/features/6286318/p-2.html

So again, while the 3DS is a lot of money, for a handheld with new technology in it, it's certainly not comparatively out of line.

It almost seems reasonable. However, $250 still buys a lot of stuff (for now). So I look at it as still being overpriced.

Must be a Jedi Mind trick or something. :)

Maybe next year! :D

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Bill Loguidice
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Timing - So hard to predict
Rowdy Rob wrote:

Since the Nintendo 3DS is glassless, people might be wondering "why can't I have this on my TV?" It just seems like it would help get people clamoring for glassless 3D on larger screens.

The interesting thing with reports of the 3DS are that just like regular glasses-based 3D, viewing angle is critical and it's fairly easy to move the device out of focus and create the dreaded blurred/double image. Also, how well the 3D effect works varies both by person and the game that they're playing (i.e., a game that works well for one person might not well for another). Naturally, trying to scale up the 3DS technology will be difficult, but it's my understanding that there is glasses free technology out there with a fairly generous viewing angle, so hopefully there IS that clamoring for it and it gets on the fast track. I'm still thinking 5 - 10 years is about how long we'll have to wait for "proper" glasses free TV, and another 10 - 15 years after that for hologram TV, which will to me will be the final step in display technology short of direct retinal projection and then direct brain interfacing.

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Lorfarius
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I think I will pick one up

I think I will pick one up but I'd rather wait until they come down in price. Just seems too expensive at the moment.

Rowdy Rob
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3DS May Help Push Consumers Toward Glassless 3D

One of my friends recently bought one of those liquid-crystal shutter-glasses-based HDTV's. I forget the make and model of it, but it was probably in the 60+ inch screen-size range. I was quite excited to see it, so I went over.

I must concur with Bill that 3DTV just isn't ready yet, and won't be until glassless 3D TV technology arrives. I found that the flicker of the shutter glasses was quite noticeable, especially when watching TV during the day. It didn't help that my first viewing experience was during the day, and my friend has his TV set up in his sunroom, with large windows on both sides (and behind!) his TV! It was rather difficult to concentrate on the TV when the peripheral view of his sunlit back yard was flickering like a strobe light.

After sundown, in a darkened room, the experience was better, but the flickering of the shutter glasses is still noticeable. I understand that the polarized glasses-based 3D systems don't have the flicker problem, but at the expense of essentially halving the horizontal resolution of the image. It took a while for my eyes to "tune out" the flicker and get lost in the video.

The 3D image itself was, at times, very impressive, but for the most part it wasn't as dramatic a difference from a 2D image as I expected. The 3D effect was often subtle.

Another thing that I noticed. When watching a movie in 2D, out-of-focus background stuff doesn't get noticed as much; you tend to focus on what the camera is focused on (like the actor). But in 3D, your eyes tend to wander around the screen trying to take it all in ("hey, let me check out the clock on the wall"). Out-of-focus stuff becomes very noticeable, because you start trying to focus on that blade of grass, but it's impossible, since the original camera filmed it out of focus! You find that your eyes are battling the image more than they would in a 2D image.

On top of that, there didn't appear to be much, if any, actual broadcast shows in 3D. Lack of current content seems to be a problem at this time.

When the movie was over, I took the glasses off and the eyestrain was noticeable. The feeling was sort of like waking up in the morning and turning on the bedroom lights. It wasn't like stabbing yourself in the eyes, but there was a definite adjustment back to "reality."

On top of all that, I can easily see that broken glasses will be a major problem. What happens when you drop them? Or accidentally sit on them? I think these glasses are like $100 apiece!

Yeah.... Houston, we have a problem. I still enjoyed the effect, problems aside, but I don't think now is the time to jump into the 3DTV world. I'm not going to be an early adapter on this one. Perhaps this would be fine for watching an occasional movie, then doing your normal TV viewing in 2D, but certainly this technology is not for regular TV viewing.

Since the Nintendo 3DS is glassless, people might be wondering "why can't I have this on my TV?" It just seems like it would help get people clamoring for glassless 3D on larger screens.

Bill Loguidice
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Here is the historical list

Here is the historical list of handheld console prices at launch that's been making the rounds. The important one to look at is the inflation adjusted numbers (and disregard the Virtual Boy as that doesn't belong since that's a transportable console like the Vectrex, not a handheld): http://www.gamespot.com/features/6286318/p-2.html

So again, while the 3DS is a lot of money, for a handheld with new technology in it, it's certainly not comparatively out of line.

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clok1966
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Joined: 01/21/2009
I still say its to expensive

I still say its to expensive (for me). But I predict it will sell like hotcakes, and as I said, who can fault somebody for charging what people will pay.

And yes I did mention development costs, they need to be recouped. So many products are overpriced for early adopters and the price goes down as units sell and tech gets cheaper and more refined.

I wont deny Im pretty excited to see one in action, maybe it will be my first handheld since the Lynx and PSP i buy on release day. Loved my Lynx, still play it once and awhile, honestly the best handheld I ever bought except for battery life (but sadly its got more battery life than my PSP)... alot more than my PSP/DSi/G2px/NeoGeoColor/....err ok so I do buy all the handhelds...I even have that horrible phone neo geo thing ( but I got it for like $20). Gotta mention my NOmad too.. I used it alot.

Matt Barton
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It's exchange vs. use value,

It's exchange vs. use value, a concept going back at least to Marx. Two pair of jeans are identical except for a brand name, but that brand name makes them ten times more valuable to some people. Why? It's a complex issue of culture and society (to say nothing of marketing).

It seems to me that the concept is a bit wonky, because we don't really "need" anything. You don't even "need" to eat, drink, etc. You could just die. So, it seems that really everything is about wants. If the 3DS will provide you with the equivalent of $250 worth of enjoyment, whatever that means, then it's worth it. If, on the other hand, you'd derive more enjoyment from $250 worth of booze, drugs, going out, buying games for other systems, etc., then it's not a good purchase. I tend to think -- what else could I buy with that -- rather than whether it's "worth it" in any physical sense.

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Catatonic
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Joined: 05/20/2006
If you think products are

If you think products are only worth the incremental cost of manufacturing one unit then go ask the Pandora guys how much investment there is before a single one can be shipped.

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