Crystal Hammer PC version found.

Chip Hageman's picture
A while back I showcased a fun Arkanoid clone by the name of Crystal Hammer by reLINE software for the Commodore Amiga.

I had read that this game was released for platforms other than the Amiga, but I had never come across any in my travels. Well.. official ports of the game, that is- There are a few rather bad indie versions of the game available on the PC which I won't go into.

Yesterday, I was perusing one of my favorite classic gaming torrent communities and came across a European release of Crystal Hammer for the PC. I'm guessing that this was an EU exclusive release since I've never come across it in the states.

RELEASE INFO:


Publisher: reLINE Software
Developer: reLINE Software
Release Year: 1999
Platform: Windows 9x/NT (Service Pack 3)
Media: 1 CD-ROM
Image Format: MDF/MDS (I converted it to bin/cue to make life easier for you guys...)
Unpacked Size: 528 MB
Protection: None
CDDA Tracks: 11
Language: English


SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS:


Pentium class PC @ 166mhz
Windows 95, 98, 2000 WITH DirectX 6 or higher.
20mb RAM.
12x CD-ROM (32X recommended)
2mb PCI Graphics Card (4mb recommended) 800x600 16bit high color under DirectDraw
Sound Card supporting 16bit stereo sound.
5mb HD space on drive C:


This version doesn't hold up well compared to the Amiga release but it's still significant.. even, if only, from a historical standpoint. As I've said, reLINE Software closed their doors years ago, which makes this game abandonware.. even if it is somewhat recent abandonware. I'm including a link to the PC release version in this post for those that enjoyed the game on the Amiga and are curious as to how the PC version fared.

I downloaded the torrent release (in Alcohol 120% MDF/MDS format) and converted it to a bog standard BIN/CUE image (CD-DA is present) and zipped it up.

I'm hosting the file from Hotfile since I have an account and the file is rather large.. around 423mb. Those with Hotfile accounts will be able to download faster than those without. This isn't an endorsement of Hotfile.. it's just what I have access to, and because of the file size and bandwidth issues, it's what I'm using. :-)

You can burn the image with most major cd-burning applications- CDBurnerXP is a nice free burning application for Windows if you need one.

Thanks goes to Sh00tokiLL for preserving this lost classic.

Comments

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
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Joined: 12/31/1969
I might have to give this a

I might have to give this a try on my arcade rig with a spinner...

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Chip Hageman
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Crystal Hammer PC
Bill Loguidice wrote:

I might have to give this a try on my arcade rig with a spinner...

It's worth a shot. The title seems to run from the disc itself (no install.. just some temp files stored on the HD). The game is not as good as the Amiga version.. it looks like they contracted it out to another developer...

It would have been nice if they had done the port themselves.

Let me know how it works.

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Rob Daviau
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Joined: 05/19/2006
Man I played that a LOT back

Man I played that a LOT back in my AMIGA days, stood up against any Breakout clones!

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Rowdy Rob
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Joined: 09/04/2006
Big file!!!

Why is this game so huge? If I recall correctly, the Amiga version fit on a single 1.4meg floppy disk.

I did play a fair amount of this game back in the day, but I enjoyed the licensed Arkanoid a bit more. It was one of those "show-off the Amiga" games, being a near-perfect port of the arcade game.

Chip Hageman
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Joined: 10/06/2010
File size is due to the cd

File size is due to the cd digital audio... I was going to MP3 the tracks but that cuts down on the compatibility with burning software.

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Bill Loguidice
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Joined: 12/31/1969
It's all about control
Rowdy Rob wrote:

I did play a fair amount of this game back in the day, but I enjoyed the licensed Arkanoid a bit more. It was one of those "show-off the Amiga" games, being a near-perfect port of the arcade game.

Ironically, my favorite port of Arkanoid was for the C-64, since that supported the paddles. I actually beat the game on the C-64. I never liked controlling Arkanoid with the mouse on the Amiga. I've since acquired the Famicom and MSX ports with their respective paddles as well, though I haven't had a chance to try them.

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Matt Barton
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Joined: 01/16/2006
Arkanoid
Bill Loguidice wrote:

Ironically, my favorite port of Arkanoid was for the C-64, since that supported the paddles. I actually beat the game on the C-64. I never liked controlling Arkanoid with the mouse on the Amiga. I've since acquired the Famicom and MSX ports with their respective paddles as well, though I haven't had a chance to try them.

I never played a version of this or Breakout with paddles until much, much later. My first encounter with this type of game was Arkanoid. I suppose a paddle would make a lot of sense for this kind of game, though I have no problems at all controlling it with the mouse.

I think if I was using a paddle, I'd like one that would return to center by itself, so that I could feel the extension by the torque.

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Bill Loguidice
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As far as I know, there are

As far as I know, there are no self centering paddles or spinners. That doesn't make a lot of sense actually if you think about, as you control it like a dial, so you wouldn't want to constantly be fighting against it like say a force feedback steering wheel. It's the ideal method for controlling Pong-like games and Arkanoid-like games, as well as games requiring any movement on a fixed plane, like Warlords. It's not even a contest between that and a mouse, actually.

The major difference between a paddle and spinner is that a paddle has hard stops on the left and right and a spinner is free spinning. Most gamers such as myself naturally prefer the free spinning model, but that's never been implemented in home settings outside of homebrew arcade controls or cabinets such as what I have in the basement. There are some standard controller paddle designs without the hard stops, but they also don't freely spin. The test of a good spinner is how many rotations it makes when you give it a good spin...

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Matt Barton
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Joined: 01/16/2006
Arkanoid
Bill Loguidice wrote:

As far as I know, there are no self centering paddles or spinners. That doesn't make a lot of sense actually if you think about, as you control it like a dial, so you wouldn't want to constantly be fighting against it like say a force feedback steering wheel. It's the ideal method for controlling Pong-like games and Arkanoid-like games, as well as games requiring any movement on a fixed plane, like Warlords. It's not even a contest between that and a mouse, actually.

I'm not sure I'd like it either, but it'd be nice to try it out and see.

I guess the ultimate controller for Arkanoid would be a slider.

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Bill Loguidice
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Paddles and spinners
Matt Barton wrote:

I guess the ultimate controller for Arkanoid would be a slider.

No, spinner. ;-) Seriously, a slider just wouldn't cut it, it would be too slow, like a mouse, unless there was some way to have the slider be virtually friction-free like a spinner. Even then, you would have to have the slider map 1:1 to what's happening on screen and I just don't see that as working with the way Arkanoid works. If you use an arcade quality spinner, it's just about as responsive as you can make something while giving you the freedom to move as quickly as you can possibly can. Also, Arkanoid was designed for a spinner in the first place. It's like trying to play Pong with anything but a paddle/spinner. It's just not the same.

Interestingly, though Atari had the standard hard stop paddle for use in the home pre-crash (post crash there really wasn't any, though there was the one off Arkanoid spinner for the NES and systems in Japan), Commodore released their own high resolution paddle for use on the Vic-20 and C-64, which is why some of the games from Commodore for those systems don't control as well with the Atari paddle, even though they're compatible. Those games are looking for the higher sampling rate of the Commodore model. I never knew that until relatively recently. Luckily, the C-64 version of Arkanoid was tuned for the standard Atari paddle.

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