video game contest playing on TV through your telephone.

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Bill Loguidice
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Alternative Descriptor of Early Version?

http://www.retrothing.com/2006/06/tv_pow_70s_vide.html

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
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[ http://www.MythCore.com ]

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Bill Loguidice
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Starcade was on regular

Starcade was on regular television and was a game show type format where usually two kids, though sometimes two kids each with a parent would play arcade games to see who got the highest scores. It's available on DVD now and through various feeds. G4 played it as recently as last year, though I don't believe they do much with videogame content anymore.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[ My collection ]
[ http://www.MythCore.com ]

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rush2112
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Thanks Bill for your

Thanks Bill for your response and the information. I do not think it was Starrcade Matt. If starrcade was on cable TV it definately was not starrcade because I did not have Cable TV at that time. I appreciate everyone's input.

Bill Loguidice
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Mini-videogame contest on WPIX in the early 80's

Nope, not Starcade. I lived and still live in the NY Tri-state area, New Jersey specifically, and I watched Channel 11 WPIX as a kid (big Star Blazers fan). Anyway, what he was referring to was a mini-contest between shows that lasted a few minutes. Basically some kid would call in while "Space Spartans" or "Star Strike" for Intellivision was displayed on the TV screen and he (invariably a "he", the kid) would say something like "pow" or "shoot" or "fire" or some such thing (maybe it was "Pix"?) to take out the targets. If he got enough points, he would win a prize.

Doing some research on my memory, according to Wikipedia's entry on the Intellivision:

Videogames, on TV, by telephone
"TV POWWW" was a television show where callers could play a Fairchild Channel F game by saying POW! into their telephone to interface with the system. The television show "Switchback" aired locally in Calgary, Alberta also featured these interactive games, and the use of the word "Pow". With the eventual failure of the Fairchild Channel F, the system was upgraded to use the Intellivision. During the early 80s, New York based television station WPIX ran a variant of TV POWWW called TV-PIXX. It was aired during the traditional weekday afternoon slot of children's programming as an interlude during whatever show was being aired. Participants would be called at home to play a videogame that appeared on their screen. Two of the earliest games featured on the segment were simple games such as Tic Tac Toe and a Breakout type game called Moving Target. Intellivision's Football, Baseball, Basketball, and Space Battle were later featured as the TV segment got more popular. Participants would say the word "PIXX" in order to affect a game action such as passing the ball, swinging the bat, or firing the laser. Based on the score, Kids could win prizes such as T-shirts and $10 Dollar U.S. Savings Bonds. They could double their prize or win a bonus prize (such as advance tickets to see upcoming films) by answering a Trivia question. For a chance at playing, kids could send a postcard with their name, address, and phone number to TV PIXX c/o WPIX TV, New York, NY. TV Pixx lasted until 1982 when the Intellivision system became a popular home game system but for many New York viewers, this TV segment was their first glimpse of the Intellivison home game system.[2]

Frankly, I don't remember the Fairchild Channel F part of it - probably blocked it out or came in a bit later, but I wouldn't doubt it. I have a Channel F of course and cover it quite a bit in my book - it was after all the very first real videogame system - but most games were fairly pitiful. Nevertheless, its games were probably more conducive to the format than those for the Intellivision. (by the way, I noticed timing issues as a kid, so I suspect it was nothing more sophisticated than someone at WPIX pressing the fire button every time they heard the kid go "Pix!")

=================================
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[ My collection - http://www.billandchristina.com/vgamecomp/vgamecomp.htm ]
[ http://www.MythCore.com ]

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Matt Barton
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Starcade

My guess is you're talking about Starcade.

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