What's your prediction for the Nintendo 3DS?

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Matt Barton
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Catatonic
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Let's see what happens when

Let's see what happens when it's Superbowl party time and all your guests need 3D glasses to watch the show.

Nous
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Not Free, but easy to do

"To my mind, the good news is that by the time the "PS4" and "Xbox 720" come out (and hopefully the "Wii 2"), 3D and its associated techniques and implementation will have matured enough where you have no performance hit whatsoever over 2D (i.e., the necessary doubling tech will be built into the hardware and "free")."

The "doubling" can never be free (unless you cheat - but that's not proper 3D and only applicable in certain cases) because it will still require a certain significant amount of extra computation and throughput .. you simply need more hardware (at a cost) thrown at the problem, no way around it. Of course as prices come down those solutions will be more affordable - but never as cheap as a non-3d solution.

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Bill Loguidice
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Nintendo 3DS's importance from a technological standpoint

That's why something like the Nintendo 3DS is so important since it will be the first mass market 3D device that does not require glasses. If the reaction to the 3D effect on that is positive (bottom line, it works and causes no unpleasant side effects in most people's perceptions) it should have a nice snowball effect. Sure, initially the 3D will be mostly a gimmick, but there are some potentially innovative uses for it, and those can only really happen when 3D is commonplace and does not require anything different from the norm to view it.

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Matt Barton
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Glasses
Mark Vergeer wrote:

I already wear glasses and I am very weary of having to wear another set of glasses on top of those for watching 3D TV. This glasses-less 3D TV will be the only type of 3D TV that I would want to watch..

I feel the exact same way. I don't really like wearing glasses anyway, much less two pair! That would quickly get unbearable.

One of my students recently went to check out some of the new 3D TVs, and he was very unimpressed. According to him, the 3D is minimal, and even where it's noticeable it tends to look blurry or distorted.

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Bill Loguidice
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The 3D monster
Mark Vergeer wrote:

I already wear glasses and I am very weary of having to wear another set of glasses on top of those for watching 3D TV. This glasses-less 3D TV will be the only type of 3D TV that I would want to watch.
Recently experienced playing Gran Turismo 5 in 3D on a TV with 3D glasses and well - the 3D effect sucked.... partly because it was hardly functioning but when it did I found the experience not the big giant leap in experience I thought it would be. Probably because the 3D effect only enhanced the artificial polygons even the PS3 screen is built up off....

I agree 100%, Mark. When you take the glasses out of the equation, it suddenly becomes a "normal" experience. One issue with doing 3D on even powerhouses like the PS3 and Xbox 360 is that the frame rate is generally halved since it has to drive two "separate" displays for the same image. So I suspect that the Gran Turismo 5 disappointment was as much related to lowered smoothness (30 frames per second versus 60) as it was to the 3D itself. To my mind, the good news is that by the time the "PS4" and "Xbox 720" come out (and hopefully the "Wii 2"), 3D and its associated techniques and implementation will have matured enough where you have no performance hit whatsoever over 2D (i.e., the necessary doubling tech will be built into the hardware and "free").

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Mark Vergeer
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Glasses-less 3D

I already wear glasses and I am very weary of having to wear another set of glasses on top of those for watching 3D TV. This glasses-less 3D TV will be the only type of 3D TV that I would want to watch.
Recently experienced playing Gran Turismo 5 in 3D on a TV with 3D glasses and well - the 3D effect sucked.... partly because it was hardly functioning but when it did I found the experience not the big giant leap in experience I thought it would be. Probably because the 3D effect only enhanced the artificial polygons even the PS3 screen is built up off....

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Bill Loguidice
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Glasses-less 3D TV

Well, it's a start: http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/10/04/2334206/Toshiba-To-Launch-No-Gla...

Just another 5 years to wait for large TVs at sub-$2,000 prices, then 3D TV will really start to take off...

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Catatonic
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I assume Nintendo know what

I assume Nintendo know what they're doing - the product is expected to be in extremely high demand, with limited supply, so you charge the early customers a premium to keep things in check.

Bill Loguidice
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Not necessarily backwards...
Keith Burgun wrote:

The problem is, it's backwards. People aren't coming up with a game and saying "This game requires 3Dness to be really good" or "This game requires a touch screen to be good" - no. They're saying "well, this system has INSERT_HARDWARE_GIMMICK_HERE, so how do we cram that into the existing design?"

I can say for certain that there were SEVERAL games on the DS that were only hurt by only offering the crappy touch-screen controls. StarFox and Zelda come to mind. I can only imagine how Advance Wars will be damaged by trying to cram "THREEDEENESS" into it.

Again, I disagree. While on a basic level there's no way to argue with what you're saying, i.e., that the needs of developers should drive hardware, more often than not, as I stated earlier, developers won't always know what's possible until they're challenged by something. For instance, Sony gambled on polygons by optimizing the PS1 for that very function, while its main competitor, Sega, with its Saturn, had a design originally optimized mainly for killer 2D, with more modest 3D. Once Sega got a whiff of what Sony was doing, they hacked together additional 3D capabilities, but it was too late. Nobody could have predicted the response to polygonal games by the public and if everyone stuck with what developers really wanted at the time, then it just would have been Sega's original vision with the Saturn. Like it or not, Sony's gamble changed the industry. Same thing with Nintendo and the Wii. Like what Nintendo did with the Wii or not, the public responded and developers had to respond in kind. Same thing with the DS. Sometimes, it really does have to be the hardware that drives what developers do. Again, it NEVER fully replaces what came or has been established before, it just adds to it.

So I say, so what if no developers are clamoring for real 3D for their games? The fact of the matter is, having the OPTION will allow them to think of ways to make use of it. Certainly this will mean games that either weren't possible or would be difficult to do without the added depth/field of view. Same thing with Move and Kinect. Sometimes it really is up to the technology to drive developer innovation. Unfortunately that will also mean cheap cash-in software that defines what we mean by gimmick. So what, though, because we have that anyway even without any new advances...

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Keith Burgun
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To clarify

The problem is, it's backwards. People aren't coming up with a game and saying "This game requires 3Dness to be really good" or "This game requires a touch screen to be good" - no. They're saying "well, this system has INSERT_HARDWARE_GIMMICK_HERE, so how do we cram that into the existing design?"

I can say for certain that there were SEVERAL games on the DS that were only hurt by only offering the crappy touch-screen controls. StarFox and Zelda come to mind. I can only imagine how Advance Wars will be damaged by trying to cram "THREEDEENESS" into it.

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