Awesome MicroSD Drive Pak for the Radio Shack Color Computer series!

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Bill Loguidice
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I wasn't aware of this until yesterday, but this looks like another perfect solution, and a good price to boot, this time for the Radio Shack Color Computer series: http://www.coco3.com/community/

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Bill Loguidice
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Today's collector can be different
Matt Barton wrote:

I've been thinking more and more about what kind of collector I want to be once I actually have the disposable income and space to enjoy the hobby. I think I'll probably be more interested in boxed software, even for systems that I don't own. Unless there's just no way to get a decent experience via emulation, I would still enjoy looking at the original manuals and displaying the box art. It's also a little easier to store. Of course, to test it, I'd still need a working system (assuming that was important to me, which I'm wondering about).

In any case, I think I'm too spoiled by the advantages of modern emulation to put up with a real system. That definitely includes things like Pool of Radiance for the C-64, or any of a number of Amiga games with long loading times. Just too easy to pop it in an emulator. But having the real system would make all the difference in the world with something like Vectrex or ColecoVision.

The Vectrex and Intellivision, yes, you DO want the original hardware because of the former's display and the latter's controller, but not so much the ColecoVision in my opinion because you can perfectly emulate the majority of its functionality and not lose anything in the translation, which I think is the key to any casual collector's query, "Is it worth it to own the original hardware?". Naturally, there are exceptions, like the driving controller, but only a handful of games make use of the specialized controllers like that and the Super Action Controllers. That's also more of a money/space investment getting all of the ColecoVision's add-ons.

In any case, I think today there is now an ideal scenario for the true retro gaming/computing enthusiast (but not hardcore collector) that Rob alluded to that really wasn't available from the time I started collecting (and didn't realize it) in my youth to just a few years back, and that's all these flash memory solutions. While they tend to cost around $100, more or less, the reality is you can fit either all or a great percentage of a particular system's software on the device and pretty much only have to worry about maintaining your console and controllers. Quite frankly, with all of the disk drives (and tape drives) and various add-ons and what-not to make it all work that I have in my collection (and the associated costs and reliability issues), I would seriously consider going the main system with virtual storage route exclusively if I were collecting today, and just get the occasional truly interesting boxed software where the packaging and documentation really warranted it (like the Infocom, Origin, or SSI stuff, for instance). Of course I've also benefited from the evolution of this virtualization technology, where we had early solutions that allowed, for instance, our C-64's or Atari 8-bit's to interface via serial cable with a PC and use that as a disk drive, to today's more portable solutions that just require you to easily write to an SD card and pop it back in.

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Rob Daviau
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Joined: 05/19/2006
Thanks Bill.
Bill Loguidice wrote:
MaximumRD wrote:

Definitely I want to get into the CoCo at some point Bill. I love devices like this. Would you say it is well worth it? Also say:Works with any CoCo that has Extended BASIC, is that in specific models or easily added to any CoCo? Thanks Bill.

Yes, no worries. Basically you just need a 16K or greater CoCo 1, 2 or 3 to utilize Extended BASIC. In other words, you'd have to go out of your way to acquire a low memory CoCo. While most CoCo 2's are 64K in the wild, there's little reason not to just get a CoCo 3, which comes stock with 128K, and is easily expandable to 512K and beyond. CoCo 3's are plentiful and so compatible with CoCo 1 and 2 software that the few instances where it's not are not really worth worrying about. Naturally if you get a CoCo 1 or 2, there's no way you can run CoCo 3 software, but the reverse is obviously not the case since the compatibility is so high. They're not great game machines, but the CoCo 3 is certainly respectable, and the whole CoCo line has some standout games, going all the way back to 4K software.

Is this device worth it? Yes, I bought one, so there's your answer... ;-)

Thank you for your response Bill, definitely I will keep it in mind. I consider myself somewhere between the emulator and hardware type of collector, I prefer playing on original Hardware but I prefer using flashcarts and devices like this that make using the original hardware as convenient and simple as possible.

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Matt Barton
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hehe
Bill Loguidice wrote:

Is this device worth it? Yes, I bought one, so there's your answer... ;-)

LOL! Yeah, but Bill, you're also an avid collector of obscurities and curiosities.

I've been thinking more and more about what kind of collector I want to be once I actually have the disposable income and space to enjoy the hobby. I think I'll probably be more interested in boxed software, even for systems that I don't own. Unless there's just no way to get a decent experience via emulation, I would still enjoy looking at the original manuals and displaying the box art. It's also a little easier to store. Of course, to test it, I'd still need a working system (assuming that was important to me, which I'm wondering about).

In any case, I think I'm too spoiled by the advantages of modern emulation to put up with a real system. That definitely includes things like Pool of Radiance for the C-64, or any of a number of Amiga games with long loading times. Just too easy to pop it in an emulator. But having the real system would make all the difference in the world with something like Vectrex or ColecoVision.

n/a
Bill Loguidice
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Joined: 12/31/1969
CoCo's
MaximumRD wrote:

Definitely I want to get into the CoCo at some point Bill. I love devices like this. Would you say it is well worth it? Also say:Works with any CoCo that has Extended BASIC, is that in specific models or easily added to any CoCo? Thanks Bill.

Yes, no worries. Basically you just need a 16K or greater CoCo 1, 2 or 3 to utilize Extended BASIC. In other words, you'd have to go out of your way to acquire a low memory CoCo. While most CoCo 2's are 64K in the wild, there's little reason not to just get a CoCo 3, which comes stock with 128K, and is easily expandable to 512K and beyond. CoCo 3's are plentiful and so compatible with CoCo 1 and 2 software that the few instances where it's not are not really worth worrying about. Naturally if you get a CoCo 1 or 2, there's no way you can run CoCo 3 software, but the reverse is obviously not the case since the compatibility is so high. They're not great game machines, but the CoCo 3 is certainly respectable, and the whole CoCo line has some standout games, going all the way back to 4K software.

Is this device worth it? Yes, I bought one, so there's your answer... ;-)

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Rob Daviau
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Joined: 05/19/2006
Looks cool!

Definitely I want to get into the CoCo at some point Bill. I love devices like this. Would you say it is well worth it? Also say:Works with any CoCo that has Extended BASIC, is that in specific models or easily added to any CoCo? Thanks Bill.

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