Adjusting a Computer Screen to Compensate for Vision Problems

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Matt Barton
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This is probably more a question for Mark than anyone, but perhaps someone else can help. What I'm wondering about is whether it's possible for a computer display to adjust or sync itself to a particular eye glasses prescription, so that a person with a vision problem (in my case, near sightedness) could see the screen clearly without having to wear glasses or contacts. Right now, if I take my glasses off, the screen is very blurry. I don't see any reason why the computer couldn't adjust the display so that I could see it clearly with my naked eye.

So, is this possible? If so, is there currently software somewhere for this purpose?

If it is possible and there is no such software, perhaps it's time we invented it!! :)

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Bill Loguidice
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TripHamer wrote:
Why not just wear the glasses I wonder?

I think it comes down to a very human desire not to have crap on our face, which is why 3D will probably never take off in the home again until there's a viable glasses-less solution. Even something like Google Glass is only temporary until they put it into contacts or embed it in our eyes.

I just wish that laser eye surgery would fix "old person" syndrome of stuff up close being blurry, then I'd have that done in a hot second.

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TripHamer
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Why not...

Why not just wear the glasses I wonder?

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Anonymous (not verified)
and if u are farsighted large

and if u are farsighted large monitors are better i guess

Anonymous
companies should make

companies should make cellphone sized monitors for near sighted ones...this does not weakens eyesight i guess

Bill Loguidice
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Yep!
davyK wrote:
Bill Loguidice wrote:

I don't think it's possible to do it on the viewed end, only on the viewing end. I know that some rich guys have their car's windshield ground to their prescription so they can drive without glasses, but that's something you look THROUGH, not AT. For it to do something like you want, you'd have to adjust the font size to where you see it.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.

I thought that was an old stand-up joke Bill - even if it was feasible surely that would only work if your head was positioned perfectly at the point where the light is refracted to in the car?

That would make for an uncomfortable journey as a passenger......and a freaky sight for others if the driver has very bad eyesight!!!

You know, I think you're right. I certainly should have thought about that one more as it would be completely impractical!

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davyK
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prescription windscreens?
Bill Loguidice wrote:

I don't think it's possible to do it on the viewed end, only on the viewing end. I know that some rich guys have their car's windshield ground to their prescription so they can drive without glasses, but that's something you look THROUGH, not AT. For it to do something like you want, you'd have to adjust the font size to where you see it.

***************************
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.

I thought that was an old stand-up joke Bill - even if it was feasible surely that would only work if your head was positioned perfectly at the point where the light is refracted to in the car?

That would make for an uncomfortable journey as a passenger......and a freaky sight for others if the driver has very bad eyesight!!!

davyK
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I'm afraid that since my mid

I'm afraid that since my mid 40s I have become reliant on glasses for reading. No amount of moving closer to the screen helps. It is extremely frustrating after 40 odd years of perfect eyesight to be caught out in situations because I'm not yet in the habit of always having a pair with me.....

Larger fonts and clear fonts help of course.....but colour schemes can make reading very difficult for me now even with glasses sometimes.

Hardcopy user manuals with tech devices are usually bad too because of the very small font size - I actually have a magnifiying glass that I've had to use at home on some packaging and manuals depending on light levels, font and colours. Very annoying. I probably need a new prescription now though as it has been a couple of years since I got my glasses.

ruthan
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I saw in some shop only

I saw in some shop only special glasses for computer usage even for people without vision problem, which claims to be more friendly to eyes, than look to monitor without it.
Variant with specific custom dioptries setup was also available.. Company is named Gunnar here is link:
http://www.gunnars.com/advanced-gaming-eyewear/

Who: Brujah Zealot, the pimp of babylons bitch. / Location: Scorched heart of Europe. // Sorry for my moldavian sort of english, i have 2 possibilities, to be silent or try to say something +look like idiot..

Mark Vergeer
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Revisited - perhaps it is possible with help of the new 3D tech

Nearsightedness is a refractionary vision problem where the eye refracts incoming light too much so that the image is focused in front of the retina instead of right on the retina. This results in blurred vision outside of the range (objects that are further away) where the eye can compensate by making the eye lens less concave.
Farsightedness basically has similar issues but in this case the image is focused behind the retina instead of on it usually for objects close by.

So basically it is a problem of the image being out of the range of focus of the affected eye and that is largely affected by the level of near/far sightedness. I am nearsighted myself and I can read without effort holding a book at normal length. A computer monitor or anything further away is blurred. That can only come into focus when it is near enough to my unaided nearsighted eye for it to be able to focus on.

There is nothing that you can do to a computer monitor in terms of refresh rate or something else that will make it come into focus to the unaided nearsighted eye when that monitor is out of range that the eye is able to compensate. You could use larger fonts and larger screens to make out the shapes but the image itself remains blurry. The only thing I can thing of is by putting some sort of flat lens on top of the screen - that has the same size of the screen - that will bend the beams of light in such a way that the unaided eye is able to focus the image properly. Still that would actually resemble a pair of glasses affixed to the screen. Still it is come thing a manufacturer of monitors could come up with. A sunken computer monitor behind a flat lens that adjusts how it sends out an image depending on the limitations or handicaps of the eye watching the image with similar techniques that are used with glasses-less 3D TV techniques.

Refractionary visual problems can only be solved by altering the way the rays of light hit the eye with help of lenses in front of the eye, (glasses or contact lenses) or by altering the shape of the eye where cornea surgery makes the altered cornea aid the lens inside of the eye to focus the image into the retina again.

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Mark Vergeer
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<()>

point < (lens) > point
object retina

The eye is perfectly suited for displaying an upside down and inverse picture of the environment around. When the eye's optical system focuses a single point in the outside world will be in perfect focus on the retina to be perceived as that same point.
If a person is nearsighted it means that the image of nearby objects can be focused on the retina but objects further away can not be focused clearly. This is because the axis of the nearsighted eye is a little too long and/or the lens is a little too bulbous. This means that that the image will be focused in front of the retina which results in an unclear perceived picture.

With farsighted people it's the other way around. The lens is not capable of refracting the light of nearby objects enough so that it becomes a sharp image on the retina. The axsis of the eye is relatively short and/or the lens is a little too flat/stiff. The image will be focused behind the retina which results in an unclear perceived picture.

Much like a slide-projector needs to focus the image on the projector screen.

The original image needs to be sharp for the eye's optical system to recreate a sharp image on the retina. It's not possible - by trickery - to make a monitor behave in such a way that the eyes of a near/far sighter person will perceive a clear picture unaided.

The only way for a near/far sighted person the see clear/sharp images is by changing the refraction of the rays of light coming in to the eye in such a way that the point at which the image is focused in the eye is precisely onto the retina again.

For nearsighted persons this means a negative lens which is thinner in the middle than on the edges ) ( so that parallel rays of light coming into such a lens will diverge. When this is put in front of a nearsighted eye the image that is focused in front of the retina is transported backwards so that it falls precisely onto the retina.

For farsighted persons this means a positive lens which is thin on the edged and thicker in the middle ( ) so that rays of light will converge quicker and the image that falls behind the retina is actually focused precisely onto the retina.

It's all basic optics. Perhaps easier to explain it with pictures if needed.

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