Wii Fitness for Dummies Bonus Tips and Content - Week 03

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Bill Loguidice's picture

Wii Fitness for Dummies, available from booksellers everywhere, as well as online discounters like Amazon.com, focuses on three of the top Wii fitness programs, Wii Fit Plus, EA Sports Active: Personal Trainer, and Jillian Michaels Fitness Ultimatum 2010, as well as provides additional coverage of the entire Wii fitness phenomena and general exercise theory. As is always the case when writing a book, there is inevitably content that doesn't fit either due to subject matter, cost, or space constraints, which is where this regularly published bonus tips and content comes in. Each week, for an indeterminate number of weeks, Christina and I will be posting items that will both add to your enjoyment of the book and provide good fitness information in general.

This week, we're running the third in an eight part series of Classic Body Weight Exercises You Can Perform When You're Away From Your Wii* (*also great for warming up or cooling down, as discussed in book Chapter 1):

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The start and finish position for Push-Ups, which primarily works your chest muscles and back of your arms (triceps), but is also good for warming up your shoulders and upper back muscles. Your feet and hands should be shoulder width apart, with your fingers pointing forward and flat. Your arms should be at full extension. Your upper and lower body should remain straight and in line throughout the movement. If you’re too weak to bare all of your weight when doing Push-Ups, you can put your knees down or perform them against a wall, where increasing or decreasing your angle will respectively increase or decrease the intensity.

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The midpoint position for Push-Ups. Bend your arms until your chest lightly touches the floor, then slowly extend your arms to return to the start position. Repeat.

Reminder:
Before starting any workout regime, it is always wise to consult with your physician. This is especially important if you are pregnant, have cardiovascular problems such as high blood pressure, or suffer from an orthopedic condition. Further, should you start to experience any fatigue, shortness of breath, chest tightness, dizziness, or any other discomfort, pain, or unusual symptoms while working out with Wii Fit Plus or any other fitness program, stop activity immediately and consult with your physician.

Comments

Anonymous (not verified)
Wrist Pain Doing Pushups

Hi there. I was wandering about doing pushups because I have great pain in my right wrist trying to do them I have the strength, but the pain is bad. My instructor suggested balling my fists but that is also uncomfortable. Just wandering if you had any tips for that. i type a lot so its probbaly related to that.

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Wrist pain workarounds and possible solutions
Anonymous wrote:

Hi there. I was wandering about doing pushups because I have great pain in my right wrist trying to do them I have the strength, but the pain is bad. My instructor suggested balling my fists but that is also uncomfortable. Just wandering if you had any tips for that. i type a lot so its probbaly related to that.

Honestly, such pain is not something to be ignored. If it's a persistent thing, you should definitely get it checked by a doctor. Barring that, if you mouse with your right hand, that may be as much of a contributing factor as your keyboard. You may want to look into getting ergonomic replacements for both. If your mouse is small, you can get a larger mouse (greater size helps since it requires you to grip more with your hand) with contoured edges. Though it will have a learning curve, getting a thumb-based trackball instead can pay off huge as well. As for the keyboard, if possible, try to use one with a slight wave to it, or - and again it will have a learning curve - one with a full split to it. A generous wrist rest also helps. Any of those minor changes should go a long way to alleviating further damage to your wrist(s).

In the mean-time, tread carefully. If you still wish to do push-ups, try to do them - as the bonus content suggests - pushing against a wall (you'll be standing, angled). Doing so will remove a lot of the resistance provided by your body weight and thus eliminate a lot of the wrist stress. You'll have to do a lot more repetitions, though, and really focus on doing the movement very, very slowly and squeezing your chest muscles at the movement's apex.

Again, there's nothing necessarily wrong with working through pain, but it's important not to cause further damage and to stop doing the activities that are causing the trouble in the first place until you're healed.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.

n/a

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