Wii Fitness for Dummies now available!

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I'm happy to announce that our latest book, Wii Fitness for Dummies, available soon from booksellers everywhere, is listed as being in stock on Amazon.com starting February 8, 2010. Wii Fitness for Dummies focuses on three of the top Wii fitness programs, Wii Fit Plus, EA Sports Active: Personal Trainer, and Jillian Michaels Fitness Utimatum 2010, as well as additional coverage of the entire Wii fitness phenomena. You can use Amazon's nifty Look Inside feature to take a look at a low resolution version of a sampling of the book's contents (or see PDF excerpts here), and check out the Cheat Sheet for the book on Dummies.com. We have an official book page up on Armchair Arcade, where we'll soon be posting weekly bonus content that didn't fit in the book, as well as providing links to all mentioned above and more, including a Table of Contents (TOC) and the official Facebook discussion page. Finally, since March is Dummies Month at booksellers everywhere, we're happy to announce that Wii Fitness for Dummies is one of the featured publications in that promotion. As always, feel free to ask any questions, as both Christina and I will be happy to help. More news to follow on a regular basis, so stayed tuned!

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Matt Barton
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Awesomeness

Grats, Bill and Christina! I just looked at the sample PDF file, and the book looks fantastic. Now I must simply get a Wii Fit and this book to go along with it.

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Bill Loguidice
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Wii Fitness for Dummies
Matt Barton wrote:

Grats, Bill and Christina! I just looked at the sample PDF file, and the book looks fantastic. Now I must simply get a Wii Fit and this book to go along with it.

Thanks, Matt, I'll be curious what you think when you get your review copy of the book. We haven't gotten our author copies yet, but I hope this week!

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Rowdy Rob
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Just ordered it.

I'll let you know when I get it. I probably won't post a review of it on Amazon, though, since I don't own a Wii, much less any of the fitness products for it.

qoj hpmoj o+ 6uo73q 3Jv 3svq jnoh 77V

Bill Loguidice
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Purchase
Rowdy Rob wrote:

I'll let you know when I get it. I probably won't post a review of it on Amazon, though, since I don't own a Wii, much less any of the fitness products for it.

qoj hpmoj o+ 6uo73q 3Jv 3svq jnoh 77V

Wow, thanks. What do you plan on doing with it, though?

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Rowdy Rob
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Reviewing it.

Well, my rather unintentionally brusque "probably won't post a review" comment was probably offensive, but after ordering the book, it occurred to me that it would be difficult to post a credible review for the book. Who's going to take a review seriously from a guy who doesn't own a Wii? But after thinking about it, I came up with a decent angle to write a review from. So I take back the "won't post a review" comment.

Since I've been getting back into fitness, I've actually been thinking about getting a Wii for the fitness aspect of it. Reading this book will probably help me decide whether to add the Wii to my fitness regimen, or just stick to the old blood-and-guts workout method.

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Bill Loguidice
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Rowdy Rob wrote:

Since I've been getting back into fitness, I've actually been thinking about getting a Wii for the fitness aspect of it. Reading this book will probably help me decide whether to add the Wii to my fitness regimen, or just stick to the old blood-and-guts workout method.

I will be curious what you eventually decide. One of the reasons why I decided to do this book was that most of the good Wii fitness programs are grounded in proven "blood-and-guts" workout methods, not something gimmicky. While I probably will always believe that training with weights is ultimately the best overall form of exercise, I've found that most of these programs are very much aligned with my overall beliefs. Not everyone can or wants to work out with weights at a gym, but these programs can deliver fairly similar results, save for the quicker increase in muscle mass (which some don't care about anyway).

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Matt Barton
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I've been feeling the same,

I've been feeling the same, Rob. I've stopped working out at all, finding it very tedious on the one hand and so frustratingly slow on the other. Maybe something like Wii Fit might hold my interest better, but I suspect that it'd be something I'd for for a few months, tops, and then it'd end up on the shelf with my dusty Billy Blanks DVDs and the like.

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Bill Loguidice
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Stopping or not

I wonder when the threshold goes from starting and stopping to it being so integral to your being, that you won't stop? It crossed that threshold for me around age 15 (though I didn't get truly serious until around 18), when I somehow "knew" I would never stop. I really don't know what that "aha!" moment for me was, though, if anything. Of course I've always been fascinated by muscle, even as a child, and always wanted to be in shape, even when I was a very, very fat child, then a very, very skinny teenager. It's one of those interesting psychological things to be sure. Perhaps Dr. Vergeer has some thoughts?

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Rowdy Rob
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Working out problems... (Matt and Bill)
Matt Barton wrote:

I've been feeling the same, Rob. I've stopped working out at all, finding it very tedious on the one hand and so frustratingly slow on the other.

Matt, I'm curious, were you following a workout/diet plan, or were you just "pumping iron?" The reason I ask is that in high school, I spent a year working out with my buddies, and I didn't have much noticeable bulk. I got stronger, but I was still a string-bean. I finally gave up, sticking to push-ups and sit-ups at home. At least I had some abs, and semi-respectable biceps. But I resigned myself to the thought that I'd always be a guy that gets sand kicked in his face at the beach. (Although I would have kicked their butts for doing so...)

But it turns out that there's a lot more to "working out" than just working out. There has to be a workout plan, and also (this is CRITICAL) a diet plan! You must eat properly to increase bulk and feed your muscles the nutrients it needs when it needs it, particularly protein. And there's supplements to take on top of that.

Plus, you must REST correctly. I was pumping iron nearly every day in high school, but wasn't showing much results in physical bulk. I wasn't allowing my muscles to rest properly, which is where the actual muscle-building process occurs.

In your case, I suspect that you don't place much value in being a "jock-looking" guy, since the jocks are the very people you may have resented in the past.

Bill Loguidice wrote:

One of the reasons why I decided to do this book was that most of the good Wii fitness programs are grounded in proven "blood-and-guts" workout methods, not something gimmicky.

I admit that I haven't really followed the whole Wii "fitness" scene, but the few videos I've seen seemed to show people doing rather mundane, apparently low-intensity movements during the Wii games (which looked quite fun, actually). I think one of the videos I saw was by Matt's students! It didn't look hardcore to me. It looked like mostly aerobic workouts, and I still have exceptional stamina and energy for my age. I need bulk! But your comments here have definitely piqued my interest. With the book, hopefully I'll gain a new perspective on this avenue of workouts!

Bill Loguidice wrote:

I wonder when the threshold goes from starting and stopping to it being so integral to your being, that you won't stop? It crossed that threshold for me around age 15 (though I didn't get truly serious until around 18), when I somehow "knew" I would never stop.

I can speculate on this in your case, Bill, although obviously I'm not Mark. You said you were a fat kid, which would obviously result in teasing and rejection, which lowers your self esteem. Then you were a skinny kid, which might have much the same consequences. Plus, YOU WERE A GEEK, I assume, which was the cherry on top of the awkward teen sundae!

But, by bulking up and looking strong, you gained respect from other guys, and probably admiration from the ladies. That, in turn, fed your self esteem! You realized that pushing yourself in all aspects (not just physical) resulted in great self-esteem rewards. That's addictive!

I admit that I pursued fitness most of my life (if not bulk) for those reasons, but because I wasn't building bulk, it didn't show much until I took my shirt off. I attributed this to my genetics, and resigned myself to thinking I was cursed in this department. But when I finally got into a program that emphasized correctly working out and eating, my bulk dramatically increased! And that happened within a two-month span!

I recently joined a "fitness club," but I haven't really felt comfortable there. I like the rough-and-tough atmosphere of old-school gyms, but this fitness club feels more like a social club with weights. All the fitness essentials are there, but it's kind of a yuppified atmosphere where people want to talk to you all the time ("Hey, let's talk about this at the juice bar!") I just want to get in, work out, and get out, with no one interrupting my routine to try to get me to join the tai chi class! Working out at home is just not going to happen, but the "real" gyms are too far for me to drive to, so I hope I can figure out how to survive the fitness club "meat market."

Oh well, enough rambling... I'm looking forward to the book!

Bill Loguidice
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Food for thought
Rowdy Rob wrote:
Bill Loguidice wrote:

I wonder when the threshold goes from starting and stopping to it being so integral to your being, that you won't stop? It crossed that threshold for me around age 15 (though I didn't get truly serious until around 18), when I somehow "knew" I would never stop.

I can speculate on this in your case, Bill, although obviously I'm not Mark. You said you were a fat kid, which would obviously result in teasing and rejection, which lowers your self esteem. Then you were a skinny kid, which might have much the same consequences. Plus, YOU WERE A GEEK, I assume, which was the cherry on top of the awkward teen sundae!

But, by bulking up and looking strong, you gained respect from other guys, and probably admiration from the ladies. That, in turn, fed your self esteem! You realized that pushing yourself in all aspects (not just physical) resulted in great self-esteem rewards. That's addictive!

That's very astute, Rob, and I'd say it's pretty spot on. Perhaps there really was no "aha!" moment, perhaps it was just that as I started to see results and those results helped me improve as a person (after all, working out regularly and with purpose requires dedication and focus, physical and mental) it became more and more a part of what made me, me. Maybe that's why I have this thing inside of me that makes me want to never stop, because if I stop, I would literally stop being me, and all egotism aside, I like being me. I'm a culmination of all the bad and good that has happened in my life and I wouldn't change a thing that brought me to this point.

I always had a healthy respect for Arnold Schwarzenegger, and he attributes a lot of his success to his drive and his life of bodybuilding. Though I'll obviously never be anything in the world of bodybuilding, I can still very much relate to Arnold's basic thinking and have lived a sort of proof of concept of that. A lot of good fortune can be traced to being blessed with vigorous good health, so why not increase that good fortune by doing everything you can to make that health better?

Rowdy Rob wrote:

I admit that I pursued fitness most of my life (if not bulk) for those reasons, but because I wasn't building bulk, it didn't show much until I took my shirt off. I attributed this to my genetics, and resigned myself to thinking I was cursed in this department. But when I finally got into a program that emphasized correctly working out and eating, my bulk dramatically increased! And that happened within a two-month span!

I still "surprise" people at times myself. Until they see me in a tight shirt or with my arms or legs exposed (in the summer), I'm not necessarily thought of as someone who trains. I think that's typical of all but the most dedicated trainees or those on something. Those people have unusual size and there's generally no missing their attributes regardless of what they're wearing. I used to want that, but it turned out, like you, I didn't have the genetics for it or the desire to do whatever it took to achieve it. There's also a whole different impression you make when you go to any extreme anyway, be it extremely skinny, extremely fat, or extremely muscular. Anything too far from the "norm" is tough for a majority of other people to deal with.

Rowdy Rob wrote:

I recently joined a "fitness club," but I haven't really felt comfortable there. I like the rough-and-tough atmosphere of old-school gyms, but this fitness club feels more like a social club with weights. All the fitness essentials are there, but it's kind of a yuppified atmosphere where people want to talk to you all the time ("Hey, let's talk about this at the juice bar!") I just want to get in, work out, and get out, with no one interrupting my routine to try to get me to join the tai chi class! Working out at home is just not going to happen, but the "real" gyms are too far for me to drive to, so I hope I can figure out how to survive the fitness club "meat market."

I love old-school gyms, but they're few and far between these days. Some gyms have even done away with things like power racks or forbid squatting for "safety" reasons. Crazy stuff.

I was in pursuit of bulk for much of my training days, from say age 15 to around age 30. In that time, I was able to go from the 140's to the low 200's. There were various sticking points I hit, like the 160's in my late teens, to the 180's in my early 20's. I stopped being able to eat anything that was nailed down not too long after my mid 20's, since it seemed like my body started to respond with the wrong kind of size--fat (you have to obviously adjust your training to your age/body changes--for instance, as I got older I was able to make better gains by training less and resting more). I think especially when you're natural (no steroids) and can't devote yourself to training 24/7, eventually after quite a few years of training, you hit a type of max weight/size (perhaps genetically predetermined), which is probably different for everyone. For me, my ideal max size seems to be roughly between 185 - 200lbs, at 5'9". I think regardless of what I do at this point - unless I don't care about bodyfat any more - I probably won't be able to exceed that range. That's OK, because since my early 30's I've been about pursuing greater detail and muscularity rather than size. I'm fine with the size I am on my frame, it's now about improving what I have. Frankly, with my lackluster genetics, I think without the 20+ years of training behind me, I wouldn't have been able to reach my current size "limit".

Anyway, in regards to the Wii fitness software, none of them will give you bulk, that's for sure. The only way to achieve that is through progressive weight training, and none of them give you weights (the resistance bands included with EA Sports Active Personal Trainer don't count). Otherwise, form and function, they're all spot on, with many providing a nice mix of strength training, Yoga, pilates, plyometrics, calisthenics, and aerobics. If nothing else, these programs are great supplements to other forms of working out, and you do end up learning a lot (I knew little of Yoga before this software, for instance).

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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