Free Baldur's Gate for PLAYSTATION

Rob Daviau's picture

FREE direct port of Balder's gate (PC) on 3 discs for PLAYSTATION!
Of course to boot on actual hardware requires a method of booting backups such as a MODCHIP, NOT FOR PS2! Original Playstation only!!!!!! . Of course it can also be run in Playstation emulators like ePSXe, there is a minor issue apparently with this so PLEASE read comments at link below as info on how to get around the issue is provided! the download is in torrent form so a torrent client like Bittorent or uTorrent will of course be required, if you are not aware of the implications of this is or what it means sorry then it's time to Google and do some research until you sort it out I am not here to answer questions or troubleshoot the requirements for downloading torrent files.

!!! MAY TAKE A WHILE TO CONNECT, I AM SURE THE SITE IS REALLY BUSY!!!!!!!
INFO AND DIRECT TORRENT DOWNLOAD LINK HERE:

http://www.hidden-palace.org/?updates/c/31

for those with no experience (or bad past experience) burning image files I HIGHLY suggest Imgburn, YEAH YEAH many go on about using Alcohol 120% or Nero or DiscJuggler but really that is all overkill, for those that just want to burn the occassional image successfully there is no easier way than using Imgburn, it's FREE, lightweight, foolproof and just does exactly what you want of it, DID I MENTION IT'S FREE?

Imgburn Website:
http://www.imgburn.com/

Download mirrors (choose your own):
http://www.imgburn.com/index.php?act=download

Comments

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
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Joined: 12/31/1969
The first time is never the best
Catatonic wrote:

A friend of mine is interested in making his first commercial game, and my only real advice was to make something small he could probably finish in a month. And even then, these things tend to take two, three times as long as you thought. (or even more)

That is good advice if you ask me. My problem with the first book was that it was entirely too ambitious, and since I had never done one before, I had no sense of scale or the time it takes to finish one. Now, having done two full books for two different publishers - and dealing with a third the first time - I have an excellent idea of what's involved and how to protect myself in the future (publishers are notoriously unorganized and don't necessarily look out for the author's benefit in getting the thing done properly). Same thing with the film that Matt and I are working on for Lux Digital Pictures -- we've been sort of feeling our way around since this is our first time doing something like this. As writers and producers on the thing, we don't have the ability to start small and work our way up, but I think our individual experience with the books and the things we've done in the past have prepared us somewhat.

If you have the luxury of doing something on a small scale first, it's always best to take that option if the opportunity is there. With that said, the Duke Nukem Forever guys should have realized that. I believe most did, but the guy at the top - the one that always matters - didn't before it was too late.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[About Me]

n/a
Rowdy Rob
Rowdy Rob's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/04/2006
Over-ambitious Goals
Bill Loguidice wrote:
Catatonic wrote:

A friend of mine is interested in making his first commercial game, and my only real advice was to make something small he could probably finish in a month. And even then, these things tend to take two, three times as long as you thought. (or even more)

That is good advice if you ask me. My problem with the first book was that it was entirely too ambitious, and since I had never done one before, I had no sense of scale or the time it takes to finish one.

Courage Wolf says: "Bite off more than you can chew.... THEN CHEW IT!!!" You, Matt, and Christina did just that! :-)

Courage Wolf link

It's hard not to get ambitious dreams when designing a game. I have been secretly working on a simple arcade game concept off-and-on for about a month, but a simple game concept does not equal simple development. I have been having pretty serious issues with implementing the player control system for the game, and if I don't solve it, it's game over. Once I get past the control interface for the game, it should be gravy from there on. (Famous last words).

Bill Loguidice wrote:

If you have the luxury of doing something on a small scale first, it's always best to take that option if the opportunity is there. With that said, the Duke Nukem Forever guys should have realized that. I believe most did, but the guy at the top - the one that always matters - didn't before it was too late.

As for the "Duke Nukem Forever" development, I wonder what was going through the development team's minds during all that time. After all those years, you'd think that morale had to be rather low.

qoj hpmoj o+ 6uo73q 3Jv 3svq jnoh 77V

Catatonic
Offline
Joined: 05/20/2006
morale
Rowdy Rob wrote:

As for the "Duke Nukem Forever" development, I wonder what was going through the development team's minds during all that time. After all those years, you'd think that morale had to be rather low.

I bet. So much wasted talent. In the old days, recruiters would have hired those developers away, but now they might have to search for jobs.

The reason I advised my friend is he spent over a year working on a web site generating no revenue, now's he is in debt. I'm in the software business & have learned to start with very, very small projects, throw away the crappy ones, keep the good ones - you can grow a business like that, bootstrap it with no investment of capital, borrow no money.

But I guess that is how 3D Realms / Apogee started. It just got out of control in later years.

Bill Loguidice
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Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Considering other benefits other than $
Catatonic wrote:

The reason I advised my friend is he spent over a year working on a web site generating no revenue, now's he is in debt. I'm in the software business & have learned to start with very, very small projects, throw away the crappy ones, keep the good ones - you can grow a business like that, bootstrap it with no investment of capital, borrow no money.

I agree 100%. I've always been very careful with Armchair Arcade's finances for that very reason, sometimes going against the wishes of other staffers because of it. I believe If we can't afford to pay Armchair Arcade's expenses out of our own pockets if need be, then there's no point in doing it. We all have jobs and lives outside of Armchair Arcade, and if this were to start losing money, it really wouldn't be worth it. For this to be successful, it has to be low stress and self sustaining, while still being agile enough to be leveraged when the opportunity present itself. With minimal overhead, I think it achieves that. What little advertising we have (mostly Amazon stuff these days), it easily pays for itself. While we haven't exactly taken over the world, we have survived since 2003, and even with my poor math skills, that's over 5 years of life. Since Internet time is like dog years, I'd say that strategy has paid off.

Like anyone else, my advice is only as good as my own experience, but I often tell people of the strategy of building slow and seeing where things take you. It may not give you amazing success, particularly in the beginning, but then you also greatly mitigate the odds of failing at it. Also, you've got to do your research. I hear stories all the time of people not being able to afford their bandwidth costs, or having limited storage space, etc. As soon as we were able to move to a server host that offered unlimited everything, we jumped at the chance, particularly since it actually costs far less than most plans that limit the hell out of you.

One last thing. There was a brief discussion we were having on one of the mailing lists I frequent, which will go unnamed. Essentially one individual was complaining about how another individual could never hope to recoup their time investment from a $ standpoint in a homebrew project, so lay off pressuring him (we weren't). I countered with there is no way Matt and I could ever hope to recoup our time investment from a $ standpoint in our books, film, or, now that I think about it, Armchair Arcade. But you know what, no one is putting a gun to our heads to do it. We do it knowing there's only a small chance we'll ever make any real money at it, but it's done - often at the expense of our free (fun) time - because we have this creative passion inside that needs fulfilling, and we happen to have the opportunity to fulfill it. Life is not always about money and sometimes it is about sacrifices in deference to other rewards, be it being part of a community of like-minded individuals, the occasional pat on the back, etc. I've been thankful for my adult life since my late 20's, and being able to do what I do related to this stuff has only enhanced my quality of life ultimately, even though there are not the $'s in the bank to show for it, and may not ever be. It's a fair trade-off, and sometimes I think others have to look at the landscape beyond just $'s, and see if the "other" rewards are worth it.

With that said, I still hope to be filthy stinking rich someday, but I'm willing to enjoy the journey and won't be heartbroken if I don't happen to get there. I think having everything else in order allows me to do that.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[About Me]

n/a

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