There can be only ONE...

Rob Daviau's picture

Please give your opinions, participate, pass on this video topic to others. To all my subscribers and anyone else feel free to participate. Would LOVE VIDEO RESPONSES but at the very least leave a comment. the question is: If you could only have one console or system or computer or handheld, one to collect for and/or play on from now until the end of days WHICH WOULD YOU CHOOSE?

The only rule is none of the current generation systems/computers/handhelds or consoles.

So I am EXCLUDING NDSi/PSP/PSPgo/Wii/360/PS3/Modern PC/ModernMAC, all modern and current systems! ANYTHING ELSE PRIOR TO THOSE IS APPLICABLE. I don't care if you choose PS2, Gameboy, Atari ST, ZX Spectrum, 3D0, Dreamcast, or friggin Bandai Pippin lol! Give me your choice, your opinion of the one system of choice and please give details as to WHY you make that choice, please back up your choice with reason and details! THANKS IN ADVANCE to all who participate in any way!

Comments

Rob Daviau
Rob Daviau's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/19/2006
Good choice....

Yep that pretty much is my choice to!

Nous wrote:

It's an easy choice, it has to be the PS2 (including PS1 backward compatibility).

Why? Because of its vast and highly diverse games library. Nothing comes even *remotely* close to that, and this is no exaggeration.

However, I have to admit the Amiga comes a very close second. Let's say an A4000 but I could easily live with a tricked up A1200 for a very long time. In fact, any Amiga would do very nicely. Again, amazing platform with a huge and (most importantly) very diverse games library with many quality titles.

---------------

"Elegance has the disadvantage that hard work is needed to achieve it and a good education to appreciate it."

-- Dijkstra

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Oldschool games, some people just don't "get it"...

n/a
Mark Vergeer
Mark Vergeer's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
My video response...

A videoresponse to MaximumRD's ' There can only be one '. Love the Highlander reference here! ** originally thought it to be a Matrix reference :P

It would be the Megadrive/Genesis most of the time but the Gp2x Wiz handheld with it's emulation capabilities is a good second. But ask me in 20 minutes time and I may come up with PS2, Dreamcast, Saturn or original Xbox.... it very much depends on the time of the month... (hehehehe) and my mood. :P

PS3: MarkVergeer | Xbox 360: Lactobacillus P | Wii: 8151 3435 8469 3138
Armchair arcade Editor | Pixellator | www.markvergeer.nl

n/a
Rob Daviau
Rob Daviau's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/19/2006
Can't argue with your choice....

LOL! Thanks Mark, a superb choice!

Mark Vergeer wrote:

It would be the Megadrive/Genesis most of the time but the Gp2x Wiz handheld with it's emulation capabilities is a good second. But ask me in 20 minutes time and I may come up with PS2, Dreamcast, Saturn or original Xbox.... it very much depends on the time of the month... (hehehehe) and my mood. :P

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Oldschool games, some people just don't "get it"...

n/a
Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Feel a bit silly arguing in a thought experiment, but...

Hmm, I personally wouldn't pick a console system that can't be expanded to a computer if I couldn't pick a computer system. While the PS2 is great and has a huge library, as does the Genesis/Mega Drive, eventually you run out of games. You're also limited by the relative lack of interesting add-ons for consoles. Computers have no such limitations as they tend to be far more open systems than their console counterparts and encourage homebrew software and hardware development. I would think one would want to choose something that can be collected for indefinitely if they were stuck with just one, and most consoles, by their nature, are finite.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[About Me]

n/a
Nous
Nous's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/07/2007
I think you'll find that the

I think you'll find that the combined PS2/PS1 games library is *at least* an order of magnitude larger than that of the Genesis, irrespective of whether you want to count total number of titles or just those that might be considered as high or extremely high quality. Most people have only heard of and played a very small portion of those titles - and that seems to have been good enough to keep people gaming happily for at least a decade (or more).

I think if we're strictly talking about gaming, both in terms of quantity, quality and (to me the most important factor) diversity, then the PS1/PS2 combo that you get in a $99 PS2 console is simply impossible to beat. There's no question about it.

Of course personal taste may come into it and other choices may be made on that basis, but I find it VERY hard to believe that if I were to sit down with a random sample of say 1000 gamers from different backgrounds in order to expose them to a sufficiently representative portion of this vast library, say 20%, it wouldn't become obvious to most of them that there's not much of a choice if forced to pick one and only one system.

However, the Amiga combines both a large (huge) library of quality, highly diverse and for the most part interesting titles .. but it's also a computer with excellent development tools which in itself would provide endless hours of fun experimentation and homebrew coding.

I could've mentioned the ZX Spectrum which I still regard very highly for various reasons - and it, too, can be said to have a vast library of titles, some of which are truly outstanding and even unique. And of course it's also a computer, and so on.

But the problem with either the Amiga or the Spectrum (or the C64 or any other platform) is that, compared to the PS1/PS2 combination they simply fall short of the sheer quantity and quality of titles available on there. Even more importantly, there are literally hundreds of games, many of which not so widely known, that have no obvious counterpart on other platforms.

---------------

"You must not give the world what it asks for, but what it needs."

-- Dijkstra

n/a
clok1966
Offline
Joined: 01/21/2009
strange as it sounds

I do think age comes into this , strange to say, when you grew up, the system that was closest to your "sweet spot" gaming wise. . I was 17-20 when I got my AMIGA, I grew up with the first home consoles (2600 up to the 7800, i lived through the video game crash (it was tough on us addicts) and the Nintendo bringing it back). I had a Vic 20, C-64, atari 400, a TI 99/4A. All wonderfull machines, but somewhat the same as the console counterparts (for gameing) except with more keys. Games did look better on the Atari 400 then the atari 5200 console, but honestly not that much better. The AMIGA was the first game system (computer or console) that had graphics that where better then the arcade (at least to me) that i owned. I owned it at a time in my life when gameing "was" my passion, my free time, it was what i looked forward to the most (well that and girls). SO the AMIGA was my system when i was at the hight of my gameing "skills". Dont get me wrong, I love to game still (and I do it far to much), but am more jaded nowdays, consoles are all FPS, HALO 5 doesnt interest me even in the slightest, 75 versions of the same game seem silly to me. Basicly when i got the AMIGA i played many, many "firsts" , my first REAL TIME dungeon, My first GOD game, My first SIM game, my first FPS, my first SPACE Flight sim, My first cinemaware game, etc.. My choice of the AMIGA is maybe based more on my "love" for that time in my life, how i remeber every game being impossibly fun, etc..

I would guess younger people then me would look at the AMIGA and see a slightly outdated graphics and simplistic gameplay style of the past. If they grew up on the PS1 and PS2, i can see it being the replacement in there lives for the AMIGA in mine. Whne the PS1 came out, the 3D stuff was unheard of in homes, heck even in arcades. The PS1 came out when 3D was just a baby, and ran with it. I got my PS1 with warhawk and honeslty rember that game as the "top" game i played on it. It was the first, and most played, more so I'm thinking as it was "new" to me, not so much that it was a great game. At the time, a 3D world, with specific goals (shoot the 4 spots to shut of force fields) and so on, battles in the sky on huge carrier craft... it just hadnt been done in 3D, it looked amazing. There are a million PS games that many would point out as better, but to me.. that was it, the hight of my PS gameing. later I played every PS1 and PS2 RPG i could get my hands on... and loved um all. But Warhawk is alwasy going to be the game I remeber most, not becuase it was the best, but becuase it was a "feeling" so to speak, a time when I was playing something so new, so cool, so amazing looking it just took over my game playing.

From a purely logic point of view (to me), I would think a P-II PC would be the system to have, it could emulate most early video games, had a library of games not even the PS1-PS2 could match (as it played everything made for PC's up to that point), had 3D video cards availble so it did 3d graphics. The PC was at the top of the heap game wise in those days, different games, amount of games, free games, etc. It had the point and click game makers (rpg, arcade, text,shooter) basicly a never ending supply of fun.

Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Well, if you're talking

Well, if you're talking sheer number of titles, it's going to be tough to beat a popular computer like the C-64 or Apple II, particularly when you factor in PD stuff. The only way a popular classic computer pre-1995 would fall to the PS2/PS1 combo would be in modern style 3D games, but then again because of the newness of the PS2/PS1 combo, it fails in a lot of ways to address older style games that may be someone's preference (text adventures, CRPGs, etc.). I agree of course that a PS2/PS1 combo has to be up there in the top 5 (for me, I'd even break the rules and put my BC PS3 in the top 5, since it can do PS3/PS2/PS1/Linux/Internet) for a variety of reasons, but to me, it's simply too new to consider, particularly since the PS2 is still sold, so it has to be disqualified as far as I'm concerned. I'd say it would have to be a system that was launched prior to 1995, period. Perhaps then we could say what pre-1995 system would be the one you would collect for, then what post-1995 system would be the one you would collect for.

This particular exercise is the one platform you'd want to collect for if you could collect for only one, and again, for my money, any console without a computer add-on or some way to program or expand it seems way out. The other interesting thing with choosing a computer is that you have the whole line to choose from because they're the same basic platform. With the Apple II you have everything from the Apple II to the IIgs, and for the C-64 you have the C-64 through to the C-64GS (with all the C-128 stuff in between). You have countless thousands of programs for each, hundreds of add-ons, and stuff still being done with those platforms today. If you can get past the lack of 3D - and again, pre-1995 you kind of have to - I find it hard to make a case for a non-computer. Of course then the argument could be made for a state-of-the-art 1994 PC with DOS/Windows 3.1 that supported most PC software from 1981 - 1994, and had sufficient 8-bit and 16-bit expansion slots, but again, to me, that's too much like a modern PC and pseudo-emulation to have the same fun factor as a defunct computer line.

Of course as you say, personal preference does factor into it and ultimately it doesn't matter what anyone picks, as long as they'd be happy with it. Certainly I could make myself quite happy with the Apple II series, C-64 series, Atari 8-bit series, Atari 7800/2600, Intellivision, ColecoVision/Adam, Amiga (OCS/ECS/AGA/CDTV/CD32), ST (ST/TT/Falcon), PS1 (particularly with the Net Yaroze add-on for the PS1). I couldn't pick the Genesis/Mega Drive because it's not able to be programmed (though it IS interesting with the Sega CD and 32X add-ons), though I would probably be OK with the SC-3000/SG-1000, even though I don't know any Japanese, though I'd probably be a bit better off with the MSX.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[About Me]

n/a
Matt Barton
Matt Barton's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
Clearly, our choices are

Clearly, our choices are determined heavily by what we grew up with. Still, it is possible to appreciate a platform that is "new to you," and indeed that might be more fun from a collector's viewpoint. My family was Commodore-centric, exclusively buying only Commodore computers (Vic 20, C64, C128, A1000, and A3000). I will always have a soft spot for all these machines and still enjoy them via emulation. Still, there is a point where you're like--okay, I've seen all this stuff, why not explore the "dark side?" Or better yet, something that is pretty radically different than what you grew up with. From all accounts, the Apple II was a wonderful machine for programming, and that accessibility is what made it the platform of choice for so many grand developers. Although it was before my time, and I never owned one, I still find it fascinating and would love to learn more about it. That for me would be more interesting than just buying another A500 or Commodore 64 and retreading where I've already been. I know when I was checking out Bill's museum, I was initially drawn to the systems I recognized, but then became far more interested in stuff I had never seen or didn't even know existed.

Responding a bit to what clock was saying, the Amiga was truly a remarkable machine back in its day. I think it's hard to describe just how mindboggling that system was when it was released in 1985. I remember my friends would come over just to see the opening scenes from Defender of the Crown. Heck, even seeing King Tut or color cycled waterfalls in Deluxe Paint was amazing, to say nothing of the music. It really was such a huge, huge leap from the Commodore 64. What's more remarkable is just how long it took other platforms to catch up to it, though admittedly the Atari ST was never far behind. As impressive as the PS1 might have been, I just don't see nearly the shock and awe that people got with the Apple II or the Amiga 1000.

n/a
Bill Loguidice
Bill Loguidice's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/31/1969
Blah blah blah
Matt Barton wrote:

Responding a bit to what clock was saying, the Amiga was truly a remarkable machine back in its day. I think it's hard to describe just how mindboggling that system was when it was released in 1985. I remember my friends would come over just to see the opening scenes from Defender of the Crown. Heck, even seeing King Tut or color cycled waterfalls in Deluxe Paint was amazing, to say nothing of the music. It really was such a huge, huge leap from the Commodore 64. What's more remarkable is just how long it took other platforms to catch up to it, though admittedly the Atari ST was never far behind. As impressive as the PS1 might have been, I just don't see nearly the shock and awe that people got with the Apple II or the Amiga 1000.

First off, there was indeed a bit of shock and awe when the PS1 first came out. I was first on line for a launch unit, back when it was still practical to do such things, and I remember how blown away I was by the various demo discs in the box. Seeing 3D fighters like "Battle Arena Toshinden" or even non-3D games like "ESPN Extreme Games" were quite the revelation, as was smooth full-motion video. Quality 3D was still new then and no system to that point did it better than the PS1. Of course as with most launch line-ups, many of us soon discovered a lack of quality, gameplay and fun behind the flashiness - and of course those early 3D games were quite primitive to the stuff that would eventually appear on the platform - but it was still quite an impressive, "new" achievement. With each new generation that "wow" factor was still there, though to a far lesser degree. Likely the generation after this one will elicit far fewer wows than ever, especially with games like Modern Warfare 2 delighting people audio-visually this much this generation (it's going to be tough to make a huge quality improvement over that in one generation).

I believe the Amiga is a great choice, particularly when you factor in that it was the only computer of its era to have true multi-tasking and was able to emulate PC, Mac and C-64. There are also no major omissions from in its own library in comparison to what's on the ST, and the Amiga version was generally either on par or superior. Further, the pre-AGA machines had interesting modes and quirks, like HAM mode, for 4,096 colors. A bear to work with, but something to had further interest. It also had a reasonably powerful BASIC with it, which is another plus.

When we got our Amiga 500, my first game for it was Cinemaware's "Lords of the Rising Sun", whose opening screen and stereo sound blew me and my friends away. Deluxe Paint III was another early high point for me, and was the last time I had fun creating quality pixel art. As with you, the Amiga seemed to always be full of "wows", just like before that I had "wows" with the speech in "Impossible Mission" on the C-64, for instance. It's an old argument though, that the older the system or the newer the technology that's introduced, the more "wow's" are able to be elicited. Once something has been done, the wow factor is pretty much eliminated. That's why for the past few generations with only incrementally better 3D and audio there have been far fewer wow's than ever, a trend, like I said, I believe will continue.

I can certainly see the argument for collecting for only one system that you've never experienced before, as that's a big modern day appeal to me collecting so much for the Apple II, Atari 8-bit, TI-99/4a, etc. - I was a C-64 guy, and while I still collect heavily for that system, the OTHER systems are often more interesting to me because I get to experience something firsthand that's new to ME. However, I don't know if I had to choose only one I could trust my total enjoyment of one of the other platforms over what I know I can get out of the C-64 and all that it brings.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.
[About Me]

n/a
Matt Barton
Matt Barton's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006
I haven't had a "wow" in

I haven't had a "wow" in quite a long time, actually. I know there's always a lot of hype over the latest generation of consoles, but frankly I've not been "wowed." Instead, I feel more like we're getting exactly what we expected, more polygons, more details, higher frame rates, bigger resolutions, etc. It's not like there's some new device out there that can radically change the way we work (such as the Amiga's multitasking) or the way we play (such as the Nintendo's gamepad), though some might cite the Wiimote here.

Arguably, the only thing really different in recent times is the extended online options (thinking of Xbox Live in particular). I'm sure that dimension will continue to expand and probably be even more critical in the next generation. In any case, I don't see anything revolutionary in any of this; just consolidating gains and making incremental improvements. Indeed, of all the new platforms, the iPhone seems to be the most exciting and innovative thing available now.

n/a

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.