Wii Fitness for Dummies (2010)

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Wii Fitness for Dummies (2010)

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Matt Barton
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Yeah, it's going to be a big

Yeah, it's going to be a big downer for me when the scalp recession really gets noticeable. I always thought long haired guys with bald tops looked awful, so I'll be ready to shave it when it gets to that point. I kept a shaved head through much of college. I enjoyed the convenience and the coolness (temperature-wise), but always hated people thinking I might be a skinhead.

One thing that sucks about having long hair is dealing with the seemingly endless criticism from people who think all men should have short hair. I don't mind that much, but it sure gets irritating. I guess anybody who does anything to stand out from the crowd has to deal with that, though. According to Pumping Iron, even bodybuilders are ridiculed for being "freaks" or overgrown nerds trying to compensate or some such nonsense.

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Rowdy Rob
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Great info, Bill!

Bill, thank you for taking the time in answering my questions. Your info was very inspiring and informative, psyching me up to get back into fitness training! This bodes very well for "Wii Fitness for Dummies!"

The info on injuries was very helpful, but I'm afraid I misstated myself. I never suffered an injury while working out; my injuries occured outside of the "gym." I suffered a hyper-extended elbow during Jiu-Jitsu sparring, making it near impossible to do upper-body workouts, since I couldn't move my arm! As soon as that healed, I broke a rib falling out of my chair (very embarassing!). Needless to say, I was out quite a while...

Still, the info was very helpful. I did frequently see big, buff guys incorrectly doing various exercises in the gym. The most frequent "error" I saw was guys lifting their backs up off the bench while doing bench presses. How they got so big, without apparent injury, doing the exercises "wrong" is a mystery to me.

By the way, what's a good, safe lower-back workout? I never really got a straight answer from the "gym rats," who mostly concentrated on muscles higher up (lats, delts, etc.).

What supplements do you take for hair and prostate health? At 43, I'm starting to notice a receding hairline. Saw Palmetto for prostate? Just curious. Me, mid-life crisis??? Naaahhh...

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Bill Loguidice
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One of the bonus exercises

One of the bonus exercises originally intended for the now defunct color insert (and will be part of the online bonus content) is called "Good Mornings" and it's very good for the lower back, as are "Hyperextensions" and of course, certain forms of "Deadlifts". You can do any of the first two very safely with light or no weight (and the latter in a variety of ways without any apparatus), and they're still quite effective.

Just because someone is big or in shape doesn't mean they know much. Like I said, there are many factors, including genetics, illicit supplementation and body structure that all go into how a person looks.

For bench presses, you're actually supposed to pin your shoulders to the bench and have a gap as you raise the rest of your back up (your butt remains on the bench). This helps increase your range of motion and puts your chest girdle in an optimal position. Your feet should be flat on the floor and abs tight.

Indeed, saw palmetto is good, as are calcium/magnesium/zinc/D combos. Nothing is a miracle worker, but there's no reason not to support your system and maybe get some side benefits from it. I also use the foam version of Rogaine, which is excellent for the rear top of the head, but doesn't do much, if anything for recession, sadly. I shaved my head for a while, so at least I'm comfortable when it comes time to do so that I'll be able to psychologically handle it.

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Rowdy Rob
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A few more thoughts

Matt said:

One, I'm convinced that motivation, discipline, and persistence are the keys to a great body--not genetics or a wonder pill. People I know like Bill (and plenty of other bodybuilders I've talked to, read, or heard) say the same thing. You have to think not in terms of "getting in shape for beach season" and rather "I am going to permanently change my lifestyle."

I reply:

I absolutely think genetics is clearly a factor. There aren't a lot of Orientals that I know of that participate in bodybuilding competitions. I've also seen some ectomorphic dudes turn into massive hulks, though.

As for your analysis of my "getting in shape for beach season" comment, that was very astute of you to pick up on that! Well said... my attitude is wrong, and I need to change it.

When I was working out, I took it very seriously and pushed myself. When I was with my friends, I didn't look at it so much as "working out;" I looked at it as working, period. It was my job. That's not necessarily a bad thing; it motivated me to perform my "duty" to the best of my ability. After my real job, I would go to the gym and "work" some more, then go home and relax.

That attitude worked, for a while. I'm sure there are better ways of motivation, though.

I'm quite prone to injuring myself, and after an injury, I laid off of working out, and my workout buddies seemed to lose interest without my participation. And I never got back into it on my own, save for push ups, situps, and curls at home. Even that gradually went away.

Matt Barton
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A few thoughts. One, I'm

A few thoughts.

One, I'm convinced that motivation, discipline, and persistence are the keys to a great body--not genetics or a wonder pill. People I know like Bill (and plenty of other bodybuilders I've talked to, read, or heard) say the same thing. You have to think not in terms of "getting in shape for beach season" and rather "I am going to permanently change my lifestyle." To that end, the best advice I've heard is to focus on small, incremental changes that build up to make a difference. For instance, instead of that second Dr. Pepper, drink a glass of water. Instead of that bag of chips, eat a protein bar. Ice cream? Have some fruit instead. Instead of riding the elevator to the 3rd floor, take the stairs. Instead of seeking a "good" parking place, purposefully park far away so that you're forced to get some walking done. If you make enough of these small changes, they can make an amazing difference.

In terms of staying motivated to work out, that's the big thing for me. I find that most people who fail at working out tend to take the "distract me to fatness" approach. I see overweight or underweight people going to the gym and actually reading a book, listening to their iPods, AND trying to watch TV all at the same time. Furthermore, they lean on the console of the treadmill or stairmaster and barely break a sweat even though they're there for hours! Guys can do the same thing, or end up talking with each other more than working out. On the other hand, the really built guys focus entirely on each exercise, carefully working the target muscle groups and minimizing breaks between sets or reps. They tend to be in and out of the gym in as little as 15 minutes. Furthermore, they don't leave anything in the gym. They can barely walk and move when they're done doing their sets. My take is that it's better to get 10 minutes of hardcore, focused exercise than 60 minutes of messing around.

The muscle mags I've been reading say all kinds of contradictory things that really seem ridiculous to me, ESPECIALLY when it comes to supplements. My guess is that every Joe Smoe wants to believe that drinking a shake or taking some pills will make him buff, whereas they are at best a placebo. I get VERY suspicious of places like GMC or Vitamin World when they try to foist some kind of "ab fat burning pills" on you. Anyone who knows anything about medicine knows that there is no pill that is going to burn fat away, much less one that focuses on an area. It's just as silly as the pills that supposedly make women's breasts grow larger. Yeah, right! Yet these are the same people hawking all of their "knowledge" about supplements and such. There may be some truth in there somewhere, but those places make my B.S. detector go nuts.

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Bill Loguidice
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Response to Matt
Quote:

The muscle mags I've been reading say all kinds of contradictory things that really seem ridiculous to me, ESPECIALLY when it comes to supplements. My guess is that every Joe Smoe wants to believe that drinking a shake or taking some pills will make him buff, whereas they are at best a placebo. I get VERY suspicious of places like GMC or Vitamin World when they try to foist some kind of "ab fat burning pills" on you. Anyone who knows anything about medicine knows that there is no pill that is going to burn fat away, much less one that focuses on an area. It's just as silly as the pills that supposedly make women's breasts grow larger. Yeah, right! Yet these are the same people hawking all of their "knowledge" about supplements and such. There may be some truth in there somewhere, but those places make my B.S. detector go nuts.

Indeed, you should be cautious. The mainstream bodybuilding mags feature steroid users - levels of development that no natural trainer could ever hope to achieve, no matter what they did. The ads in the magazines will try to make you think otherwise, but don't be fooled, the only things that work anywhere near as good as steroids in steroids. And to be a top pro like those featured in the magazines, ads and pro contests requires not only steroids (I'm using this for the whole class of performance enhancing drugs, AAS, growth hormone, insulin, etc.), but also good genetics. Even if Joe Average took a bucket load of steroids, he wouldn't be the next Mr. Olympia, just like Joe Average couldn't be the next Alex Rodriguez if he lived, slept and ate baseball.

Some fat burning supplements do help, but they don't work wonders. Some help block carbs. Some help rev up your metabolism. Some help curb your appetite, etc. But none will make you eat better, lower fat, etc., nor will they help you train. It's an aid, an assist, but they're not magic pills like the ads imply.

Also, once and for all, no amount of working out will make you ripped, let alone have ripped abs. You only get ripped by dramatically lowering your body fat, and you only see your abs when you get rid of the layer of fat covering them. Thousands of crunches won't solve that. Sure, you'll have stronger stomach muscles, but you won't see them. For most people (not the genetically gifted), without a very strict diet, getting ripped abs is very, very difficult.

Quote:

In terms of staying motivated to work out, that's the big thing for me. I find that most people who fail at working out tend to take the "distract me to fatness" approach. I see overweight or underweight people going to the gym and actually reading a book, listening to their iPods, AND trying to watch TV all at the same time. Furthermore, they lean on the console of the treadmill or stairmaster and barely break a sweat even though they're there for hours! Guys can do the same thing, or end up talking with each other more than working out. On the other hand, the really built guys focus entirely on each exercise, carefully working the target muscle groups and minimizing breaks between sets or reps. They tend to be in and out of the gym in as little as 15 minutes. Furthermore, they don't leave anything in the gym. They can barely walk and move when they're done doing their sets. My take is that it's better to get 10 minutes of hardcore, focused exercise than 60 minutes of messing around.

Yeah, if you can workout for much longer than an hour, you're not working out hard enough or you're on something illegal. For most of us, we can kick our asses in well under an hour and get maximum benefit without overtraining. It's reasonable to socialize a bit, get distracted a bit, but you should still keep your rhythm going and generally rest about the same amount of time between sets, and, once you're into a set, all of your focus must be on that set. Pretty simply really.

Quote:

One, I'm convinced that motivation, discipline, and persistence are the keys to a great body--not genetics or a wonder pill. People I know like Bill (and plenty of other bodybuilders I've talked to, read, or heard) say the same thing. You have to think not in terms of "getting in shape for beach season" and rather "I am going to permanently change my lifestyle." To that end, the best advice I've heard is to focus on small, incremental changes that build up to make a difference. For instance, instead of that second Dr. Pepper, drink a glass of water. Instead of that bag of chips, eat a protein bar. Ice cream? Have some fruit instead. Instead of riding the elevator to the 3rd floor, take the stairs. Instead of seeking a "good" parking place, purposefully park far away so that you're forced to get some walking done. If you make enough of these small changes, they can make an amazing difference.

Setting goals IS important, but just like with eating better, training needs to become part of your lifestly, part of your life routine, just like going to work. That doesn't mean it has to be tedious, it's just something that you want to do because it's so positive mentally and physically.

By the way, most protein bars are junk, filled with too much fat and fillers, and are often no better than a candy bar overall. You're much better off with a good shake. I highly recommend the Chocolote flavor of the Labrada Lean Body meal replacement. Lots of protein and very low fat and carbs, and it mixed well in anything, including water, and it tastes very, very good.

Fruit is excellent, though you want to avoid too much sugars, including fruit sugars. Sugar can spike your insulin levels and have a negative systemic effect. With that said, I'm certainly not one of those who dismisses the nutritional benefits of fruits, particularly in moderation. (I regularly have a banana and apple as between meal snacks, particularly on the long drive home from work)

Indeed, making small changes definitely add up as you say. One less beverage full of calories, one less snack, walking a bit more, etc., can all add up over the course of a year to big changes.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.
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Bill Loguidice
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Response to "injuries"
Quote:

I'm quite prone to injuring myself, and after an injury, I laid off of working out, and my workout buddies seemed to lose interest without my participation. And I never got back into it on my own, save for push ups, situps, and curls at home. Even that gradually went away.

Staying injury free is key. In my 20+ years, I've never had a serious injury, though I have compromised my overall back health a bit by having too much heavy weight when squatting (among other exercises) compress my spine too much. So I have to constantly stretch my back out and be cognizant of how much downward pressure I'm putting on my spine.

It's fairly easy to stay injury free, and that's always keep your head in what you're doing, particularly when you're actually working out. If you maintain good form and don't lift beyond your means, you should generally be fine, particularly if you're already warmed up. If you're in tune with your body, you can anticipate when something isn't moving right/doesn't feel right and can stop.

One of the nice things is that you don't need excessively heavy weights to get good results. You can make 30 pounds feel just like 50 pounds by changing position or moving the weight slower, etc. As long as you challenge yourself, you can make progress safely.

Ironically, it's said that people often injure themselves most warming up or on their lightest sets, because it doesn't take as much mental focus and form can get sloppy. That's why again, being in the moment when working out - regardless of effort required - is key.

Finally, if you do get injured, unless you're laid up, you can work around the injury. I've had neck tweaks over the years that would have taken maybe a week or so to get better, which really made doing anything difficult. I just found ways to work around it, which I'm sure also helped speed the healing process.

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Rowdy Rob
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Workout questions for Bill

After over a year of not working out, I'm quite embarrassed about my fitness recently, and have decided to get back into shape. I've actually LOST between 20 to 30 (or more!) pounds, and people are wondering if I am sick or something. (I'm 6'2", and currently weigh around 178.) I guess I'm asking for advice.

I used to do a bit of cardio on a treadmill to warm up before a workout. Is that bad????

I've also read that working out your legs helps your body produce the right chemical components to increase muscle mass in your upper body as well (assuming you're working out your upper body). Anything to add-or-subtract from that advice? (I noticed you have some SERIOUS quads, by the way!!!)

I used to take creatine supplements, but some kid told me recently that creatine is currently considered detrimental to long-term health. Do you take any sort of supplements to assist in your workout regimen?

What about eating? I eat reasonably healthy, but I am by nature a light eater, which accelerated my rapid decline in weight. What, and how often, do you eat?

Probably the most important question: what keeps you motivated? The people I know who are workout fiends seem to base a core of their self-esteem on the fact that they are muscle-bound, and the respect they get from it. I like(d) looking fit, but I found that, without a group of workout buddies, my interest flagged to the point where I stopped going to the gym. I have some reasonably decent workout equipment at home, but rarely touch it anymore, not when I have a computer to distract me. The "workout fiends" seemed to REALLY enjoy working out, but I didn't; I just liked the results, which is why I needed workout buddies or coaches.

My return to skinniness bothers me to the point that I HAVE to get into shape by beach season. Any advice you give here would be appreciated (probably not just by me!). You don't have to answer ALL these questions, maybe just some overall basic advice. Thanks.

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Bill Loguidice
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A response to Rob...
Quote:

After over a year of not working out, I'm quite embarrassed about my fitness recently, and have decided to get back into shape. I've actually LOST between 20 to 30 (or more!) pounds, and people are wondering if I am sick or something. (I'm 6'2", and currently weigh around 178.) I guess I'm asking for advice.

Naturally, it's a bit better to be under weight than over weight, so I wouldn't be too concerned. The body has an unusual ability to settle on a comfortable weight, generally a few pounds over what you might like. With that in mind, there are MANY factors that go into weight, including muscle mass. I'm about 5'9" and presently weigh around 195lbs. If I didn't train at all, my target weight should be roughly between 145 - 160, though honestly, I'd be a stick figure at 145.

Quote:

I used to do a bit of cardio on a treadmill to warm up before a workout. Is that bad????

Cardio to warm up is perfectly fine. In fact, it's important to warm up before working out. That's one of the things we talk about frequently in the book. The key with cardio as a warm up is to do it relatively low intensity and only for as long as it takes to warm your body up and make sure everything is moving the way it should be. Once you're roughly at that point, you can further warm up with a light set targeting whatever body part or parts you'll be working in that session.

If you want to do cardio, save it for after your weight workout (or on a separate day), as it requires far less energy and strength to do that then it does to get a proper weight workout in.

Of course, you should also NEVER ever stretch to warm up, as stretching cold muscles can cause micro tears, if not full tears. Save the stretching for the end of your workout, which you can even use as part of your cool down.

Quote:

I've also read that working out your legs helps your body produce the right chemical components to increase muscle mass in your upper body as well (assuming you're working out your upper body). Anything to add-or-subtract from that advice? (I noticed you have some SERIOUS quads, by the way!!!)

Well, with the legs being the largest body part, it makes some sense that working them hard will have a systemic effect. The main effect though on the upper body is typically associated with squatting with heavy weights. It's called the "king of exercises" for a reason. It's very difficult, very challenging, but very effective.

I've always worked my legs hard, but everyone has certain genetic gifts, and mine have always been my quads, so they tend to respond very well to hard work. Another strong suit for me has been my chest. Weak points include my biceps and shoulders. As always you try to keep your body in balance by devoting more "resources" (workout time) to your weak bodyparts and slightly less to your more responsive bodyparts.

Quote:

I used to take creatine supplements, but some kid told me recently that creatine is currently considered detrimental to long-term health. Do you take any sort of supplements to assist in your workout regimen?

I've always taken supplements (OTC, of course), and believe strongly in them. My mainstays are protein, creatine and glutamine, as well as a multi-vitamin. I also mix in things like fish oil, lutein (eye health), joint supplements, and "male" supplements (for hair and prostate health). As long as I'm satisfied to their efficacy and safety, I don't mind taking anything. Of those, the most important are probably the protein (which is critical to gaining lean muscle mass) and multi-vitamin (trained individuals can't always get the necessary vitamins from food alone). Creatine and glutamine - when taken correctly - help to bring fluids (and nutrients) into the muscles, helping them to feel fuller, as well as helping with strength.

Despite the scaremongering mainstream media, Creatine is 100% safe. The only time Creatine has been indicted as a health concern is really when a couple of high school football players dropped dead (if I remember correctly), but that's because they were severely dehydrated and their hearts gave out. That had nothing to do with the creatine. Creatine is one of the most popular supplements on the planet and used by millions each day. It works and it's safe.

Quote:

What about eating? I eat reasonably healthy, but I am by nature a light eater, which accelerated my rapid decline in weight. What, and how often, do you eat?

If I had my druthers, I would eat four to six smaller meals a day consisting of high protein, medium carbs and low fat. Since that's not practical for me, I generally have a protein shake (Labrada Lean Body Meal Replacement Shake) for breakfast, whatever I want for lunch, then a lighter dinner, with snacks of fruit in between. I also generally don't drink my calories (from a beverage standpoint), only occasionally having a caloric beverage. If you're going to eat a lot of calories, get them in earlier in the day rather than later, as you'll have a better chance of using them. Don't stress too much over what you eat, just try to eat quality food and get as much lean protein as you can. As with the supplements, if you're otherwise healthy (no kidney disease, compromised liver, etc.), it's almost impossible to do any damage to yourself.

Quote:

Probably the most important question: what keeps you motivated? The people I know who are workout fiends seem to base a core of their self-esteem on the fact that they are muscle-bound, and the respect they get from it. I like(d) looking fit, but I found that, without a group of workout buddies, my interest flagged to the point where I stopped going to the gym. I have some reasonably decent workout equipment at home, but rarely touch it anymore, not when I have a computer to distract me. The "workout fiends" seemed to REALLY enjoy working out, but I didn't; I just liked the results, which is why I needed workout buddies or coaches.

Feeling good about yourself has a positive effect on mental attitude, sure. If you can hold your head high knowing you're doing everything possible to make yourself a better person physically and mentally can help get you through each day, and the toughest points of each day. People will also tend to respect you more if you have an outward appearance of discipline. After all, not everyone has the fortitude to work out regularly or eat better.

Motivation is a very personal thing. At this point in my life, I'm beyond motivation - working out is an integral part of who I am. In other words, I'd be miserable if I *didn't* work out and stay in shape. 20+ years of doing it will do that to you. With that said, there are times I'm more motivated than others. I can sometimes get motivation from seeing other fit or attractive people (when I worked out a gym, this was a big factor). I can sometimes get motivation from a magazine. I can sometimes get motivation from seeing a goal (beach, photos, event, whatever) a week, two weeks or months out. Sometimes even a bad 80's muscle movie will get me in the zone (anything form Arnold or Stallone is generally good). Whatever it takes.

Sometimes I have *zero* motivation, but find once I'm in the gym and the proverbial juices get flowing, the euphoria (endorphines) starts to flow and I'm in the "zone". So certainly don't overlook just "dragging" yourself to a workout and seeing what happens.

Quote:

My return to skinniness bothers me to the point that I HAVE to get into shape by beach season. Any advice you give here would be appreciated (probably not just by me!). You don't have to answer ALL these questions, maybe just some overall basic advice. Thanks.

Set SMALL, multiple goals to a target date, say May 15th, for you to be in better shape for beach season. The problem with *big* goals is that they can seem imposing and it's easy to lose motivation. Set goals of say, every two weeks, to put on a pound or two of muscle. Weigh yourself only occasionally. Go by the mirror and whether you're getting stronger or not. Remember, you tear down in the gym, so you need to build back up outside of the gym. Get to know your personal tolerance for a workout schedule. Maybe for you it's working out hard three days a week. Maybe it's five days a week. Maybe it's every other day. Whatever.

Finally, whatever you do, don't work your entire body each time. At worst, split it up between upper body and lower body. At best, split it up between different body parts, say "Chest and Triceps" one day and "Quads and calves" the next, followed by a rest day. Etc.

Anyway, lots of blather there. I'll be happy to answer any questions you might have.

Also - and I'm not doing this to promote the book obviously - if you have a Wii, you may want to consider something like an EA Sports Active: Personal Trainer or Wii Fit Plus - as both provide tools to track your activities both within and without the software, and both provide good foundations for better workouts both inside and outside the gym.

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Matt Barton
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I agree. Indeed, an

I agree. Indeed, an automated tracking system would be ideal, particularly if you felt there was enough intelligence behind it to give you reasonable goals and such. I was taking graph paper to the gym for awhile, but then got burned out on it. It seemed rather random how much I was able to lift on any given day. Kinda frustrating to go and discover that you're too weak to lift what you were doing last week. Indeed, I've noticed this fluctuating by as much as 20 to 30 pounds.

In any case, I've been reading some of my "Health & Fitness" articles and they claim a common problem with men is too much cardio exercise. I know I'm guilty of that, since running on a cross trainer or whatever is so much easier than really pushing myself with the weights.

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Bill Loguidice
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Yeah, in regards to cardio,

Yeah, in regards to cardio, it depends on your goals. If you don't want to get particularly stronger or gain muscle mass, then certainly there's nothing wrong with giving cardio equal attention or even priority. If you want to do either of the former, you have to separate out the cardio and not overdo it. It's all about allowing the body sufficient time to recover and repair muscle damage between workouts. That's one of the hardest things to learn--how far you can push your body before you're overtraining and retarding your progress.

Ideally, you'd - for example - lift weights three days a week and do cardio twice a week, and rest the other two days. Of course for someone like me, both in terms of tolerance and numerous other factors, I'd be very close to overtraining on that type of schedule.

There's also nothing particularly wrong with doing cardio AFTER weights, as long as you keep your workout time to roughly 1 hour max. Say 40 - 45 minutes weight training and 15 - 20 minutes of cardio. Technically, though, you'd be rather wasted after the 40 - 45 minutes of high intensity weight training. You could then do an every other day schedule to allow sufficient recovery between workouts, keeping in mind that the weight training sessions will involve different body parts each time. Lots of options, naturally.

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Catatonic
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I use the Nike + iPod system

I use the Nike + iPod system & they have little "celebrations" too. You'll get one every month if you set goals & reach the goals. Otherwise you won't get anything for months at a time (you may have to run for 100's of miles before a "big" goal is reached) In any case I think what motivates me is seeing my progress on a chart. Makes it harder to cheat yourself & you can see exactly how well you are doing & when you need to work harder.

Bill Loguidice
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That's a good point,

That's a good point, Catatonic. Some type of tracking is generally pretty important. I know I've gone through different stages of tracking my workouts in 20 years+, from writing down every set, rep and weight, to just keeping tracking and when and what I worked. In fact, that's pretty much what Christina and I do at this point. Even seeing how many days in a week we work out, and how many days in a month, is very telling.

One of the truly positive things about technology - be it your Nike + iPod system or the stuff on the Wii, is that it keeps very detailed records for you, so you really have less to worry about. I know I've been frustrated before when working out at a gym and having to carry around a journal with a pen and record every little thing. The more automated the process, the more you can focus on the most important part - the actual workout and getting the most out of it. It allows you to focus all of your mental resources on the task at hand, rather than micromanaging the process.

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vectrexmad
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WiiFit rewards

Bill, just two days after your book announcement my girlfriend completed 365 days of everyday use of her WiiFit. She religiously spends at least half an hour on it every day.
She was very disappointed that there was no celebration/acknowledgement made by the Wii. In fact that's been her general complaint. She got a celebration/acknowledgement after 10hrs, 20hrs, 50hrs and 100hrs. But I think 100hrs is the max and then there are no more celebrations.
Perhaps thw WiiFit programmers didn't expect people to use the WiiFit beyond 100hrs. My nephew fast became bored with the Wii Fit and didn't even reach 10hrs (a bit like me - I find tinkering with Vectrex more interesting).
regards
VectrexMad!

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Bill Loguidice
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Wii Fit Plus is definitely a

Wii Fit Plus is definitely a more compelling overall package than the original Wii Fit, so if you haven't upgraded, you might want to. The new mini-games alone are worth the price of admission.

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vectrexmad
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Wii Fit Plus

Thanks for the tip, I just purchased Wii Fit Plus for a Christmas present for my Girlfriend (I suppose I will have a few goes too).

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