What did you buy today?

Matt Barton's picture

Are you collecting vintage games or systems? Please let us know what you received or purchased--how much did you pay, was it worth it, etc.

Some of my latest acquisitions -

N64: Goldeneye, Castlevania, Ocarina of Time ($20 for the lot)
Xbox: Halo 2, Jade Empire, KOTOR ($5-15 each)
Wii: Mario Galaxy, Star Wars Lego collection, Zak & Wiki, Zelda Twilight Princess
GC: Sonic Mega Collection ($3), two used Nintendo GC controllers ($14 each)

Mark Vergeer
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You haven't seen the shmups yet....

Xbox 360: Lactobacillus P | Wii: 8151 3435 8469 3138
Armchair arcade Editor | Pixellator | www.markvergeer.nl

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Matt Barton
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I finally got a Sega

I finally got a Sega Genesis!

two, in fact, for $20. I also got a smattering of games. I managed to get one of the units working and played the Lion King, Sonic the Hedgehog, a boxing game, and a WWF game. I have a few more games to try, but it looks like they all need cleaning.

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Bill Loguidice
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Dual analog
Matt Barton wrote:

On a side note, Elizabeth was having a very difficult time--she couldn't seem to get used to the idea of two different controls for movement and firing. I was strongly reminded of the Robotron article.

As our article mentions, you should try many of the dual analog control games on XBLA on the 360. Of course the PS3 has its fair share as well. They were present prior to this generation of games, but certainly not in the same numbers.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Matt Barton
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Well, I'm starting to feel

Well, I'm starting to feel like a grade a stooge. Why?

Hehe...Well, not to be overly dramatic, but just got finished playing an hour or so of Halo 2 in co-op mode with Elizabeth. What fun! Although we did some competitive play on Unreal Tournament 2004, this is the first time I've been in an FPS in co-op mode with a split screen. I guess it would be better if we each had our own screen, but for the money this is a sure winner. Of course, the quality of the game itself helps a lot, too. I'm fascinated by how easy it was to adapt to the Xbox controller for FPS; I had assumed the transition would be painful. I'm still having a hard time aiming precisely, but as I understand that's a trade-off for everyone. I guess it's kind of realistic in a way; I'm sure I wouldn't be as precise with a real gun as I can be with a mouse. :)

On a side note, Elizabeth was having a very difficult time--she couldn't seem to get used to the idea of two different controls for movement and firing. I was strongly reminded of the Robotron article.

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Bill Loguidice
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Licenses
Matt Barton wrote:

That David Crane interview made an important point about it. You really need to have a game that can stand on its own without the license. Then, the license is just the icing on the cake (or might even distract from it or make it irrelevant if it was a dud movie). I haven't played the Riddick games, but I hear that they're better than the movies. I actually enjoyed (to some extent) Who Framed Roger Rabbit? for the Amiga, though it was mostly the music that appealed to me. I didn't actually see the film until years later.

Yes, the Riddick game is actually really well done on the Xbox. It was updated for modern platforms, but it's still the same game.

Matt Barton wrote:

Does anyone know if Rocket Ranger was intended as a licensed game based on Rocketeer? I always wondered about that.

Despite the similarities, I doubt it, as Disney made their own Rocketeer game, which I have (bundled with the Disney Sound Source). The rocket-man theme has been a common one in film.

[quote=Matt Barton
I don't know about anyone else, but I hardly ever buy games based on movies. It is a major turn off, and I need to hear some pretty solid reviews before I'd consider it. It's always a laugh going through the NES or SNES roms and trying out movie games. They're so bad it's hard to convey. There doesn't seem to be any movie so stupid that it didn't warrant a game.[/quote]

I just buy good games, period. I don't care about the license one way or the other. The only time I'll get a licensed game specificially is if it happens to be dirt cheap and I really love the license. It's why I'm an owner of "The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy" for the Wii, for instance.

Some licensed game decisions are just flat out bizarre, like "Home Improvement" and others of its ilk. Certainly the GameBoy line and even the Wii are home to some truly bizarre shovelware licensed games that try to target toddlers to teens with whatever is considered hot at the time.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Matt Barton
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That David Crane interview

That David Crane interview made an important point about it. You really need to have a game that can stand on its own without the license. Then, the license is just the icing on the cake (or might even distract from it or make it irrelevant if it was a dud movie). I haven't played the Riddick games, but I hear that they're better than the movies. I actually enjoyed (to some extent) Who Framed Roger Rabbit? for the Amiga, though it was mostly the music that appealed to me. I didn't actually see the film until years later.

Does anyone know if Rocket Ranger was intended as a licensed game based on Rocketeer? I always wondered about that.

I don't know about anyone else, but I hardly ever buy games based on movies. It is a major turn off, and I need to hear some pretty solid reviews before I'd consider it. It's always a laugh going through the NES or SNES roms and trying out movie games. They're so bad it's hard to convey. There doesn't seem to be any movie so stupid that it didn't warrant a game.

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Bill Loguidice
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Well, post Ghostbusters

Well, post Ghostbusters there was certainly a ton of movie licensed games. Some good, most bad. Today, they're as common as can be, particularly of anything animated.

If you want to go the Tron route, it's also hard to overlook the solid Intellivision Tron games, and of course games like Coleco's War Games.

Speaking of Rambo games - many of which were like souped up versions of Commando - don't forget the excellent text adventure game! In fact, there were several movie text adventures.

Really, all told, despite a high percentage of duds, some of the true classics are in fact licensed games, regardless of platform, and specifically licensed movie games. Kind of funny to think about that considering the overall reputation of such things.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Matt Barton
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I was thinking of a few such

I was thinking of a few such as Star Wars (Atari arcade, 1983) and maybe Tron (Bally Midway arcade, 1982) or Discs of Tron. I enjoyed both of those.

Other than Ghostbusters, the only really special or innovative movie tie-ins I can think of are Goldeneye, the Indiana Jones adventure games, and maybe Alien for the C-64 (first game that ever scared me) and the Rambo series. Most of them don't even try to do anything special; just graft on the licensed stuff onto a generic game; whatever is hip at the time (shooter, platformer, fighting game, FPS, etc.)

There's a big list here of 25 greatest movie based games.

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Bill Loguidice
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It's arguable if Raiders of

It's arguable if Raiders of the Lost Ark for the Atari 2600 can be considered the first successful movie tie-in, though certainly Ghostbusters is the first one I can think of on computer that was undeniably a big hit, though it wasn't released until 1985. ET - Phone Home for the Atari 8-bit was good and released in 1983, though not really a hit that I know of. Gremlins was also 1984 (Atari 8-bit and 5200, though the 5200 version was delayed a few years), and a great game.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Matt Barton
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I've pretty much decided on

I've pretty much decided on Ghostbusters for this go round. I don't want to have "the hell" again with all the stress of school starting next week, so keeping it simple this time - I know I can capture the C-64 stuff with no sweat, and I know the game backwards and forwards.

Plus, there will be a lot to talk about. I believe it is one of the first truly successful movie tie-ins. At least, I can't think of any before 1984 that rocked like that. It could turn into an object lesson about how movie tie-ins can be done correctly rather than just exploiting a brand.

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