Best Gaming TV?

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Matt Barton
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I've been trying to find

I've been trying to find ways to convince Elizabeth that we need the TV and a new 360, but it's hard. Looks like the cost will be close to $1000, and that's not even including some vitals such as an extra controller and at least one good multiplayer game for it. She'd probably rather get a Wii, but then it sort of defeats the purpose of getting the new TV. I also thought about how the PS3 does Blu-Ray movies, but the game lineup just doesn't interest me nearly as much as the Wii or 360. I particularly don't like how every PS3 bundle includes a basketball game, which I frankly couldn't care less about.

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Bill Loguidice
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It's certainly possible,

It's certainly possible, Mark, and I wouldn't doubt it. The thing with Netflix though is the discs are not shipped back and forth in a particularly good protective mailer, and you combine that with the way people generally treat rented materials and you have a recipe for disaster. I know we had two BluRay movies from NetFlix have skips, with one just losing an entire scene. They promptly sent us replacements at our request.

Of my own BluRay collection, be it movies or PS3 discs, I've had zero issues with cracking or skips of any sort. But again, there's a huge difference between a rental disc that gets mailed in casual packaging and something with one owner who takes care of his stuff.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Mark Vergeer
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BluRay discs cracks ?

I heard BluRay discs are prone to cracks appearing on the outer edge sometimes as long a 1.5mm to almost 1 cm rendering the discs unplayable. Certainly this type of thing doesn't happen to DVDs.

Has anyone over here have this problem with BluRay discs?
Cracks in BluRay discs

Oh and by the way we don't have Netflix over here in the Netherlands, this is a photo someone has posted online to show the cracks he noticed appearing in the majority of BluRay discs he rented from Netflix.

Xbox 360: Lactobacillus P | Wii: 8151 3435 8469 3138
Armchair arcade Editor | Pixellator | www.markvergeer.nl

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Bill Loguidice
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TV's and... Coraline?
Catatonic wrote:

My parents have a 37-inch Toshiba LCD, and believe it or not, there is a sort of burn-in that happened from watching 4x3 programs. Looks like dark vertical smudges, but it's not dirt. They are positioned exactly where the 4x3 area ends. I think it happened because the damn thing is left on 24 hours a day.

That happened on our old Hitachi 1080i 51" projection TV that we got back around 2001. They warned in the manual not to watch more than 40% of programming in 4:3 format, rather than the preferred stretched 4:3 mode, but we did anyway. On our new DLP from Samsung (a year or so old, 50"), which is massively thinner and lighter than the old style projection TV, can be left on indefinitely in any mode, with no chance for burn-in. It all depends on the TV. The old Hitachi used grey borders, while this new one uses the preferred black borders for 4:3 content. Different technology. Not sure about newer LCD's or plasma's, but I bet the burn-in issues for most have been resolved. Personally, I'm a "purist" and prefer watching stuff in its intended, original format, so I'm glad the issue has been resolved as far as I know in most cases.

By the way, on a side note, I picked up the Coraline BluRay the other day, which contains the BluRay version of the film, a separate DVD version and the digital download version. It also has the 2D or 3D version of the film in either format. We watched the 3D BluRay version last night and I must say, even though it was hard on the eyes, the 3D worked quite well. I was surprised to say the least. I wouldn't want to watch movies regularly like that, but for the occasional gimmick it was definitely kind of neat.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Catatonic
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My parents have a 37-inch

My parents have a 37-inch Toshiba LCD, and believe it or not, there is a sort of burn-in that happened from watching 4x3 programs. Looks like dark vertical smudges, but it's not dirt. They are positioned exactly where the 4x3 area ends. I think it happened because the damn thing is left on 24 hours a day.

Bill Loguidice
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Examples of 1080p TV's
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Bill Loguidice
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Keep in mind that the best

Keep in mind that the best HD resolution at the moment is 1080p. Lower end TV's will only do 720p hi-def natively, and up to 1080i in some cases. Frankly, I'd spend a little more and make sure you get a full 1080p set. I"d look for the cheapest 37" or 42" 1080p TV set you can get. Why invest in older technology for something that can last 10 years or more?

I have a Samsung 50" DLP 1080p set, which well over a year ago I got for only $999. It's a slim DLP, which is like an internal projection television. It obviously has multiple HDMI inputs and everything other connection possible. So DLP is an option. The newer DLP's are surprisingly thin. It's not quite flat screen like an LCD or Plasma, but it's still much thinner than an old CRT.

Whatever you do, don't be hasty and shop around. You can easily do well under $1000 and not too far over $500 for something very, very good. Again, if at all possible, get something with true 1080p support. While 720p is still gorgeous and still hi-def, why not get the maximum possible resolution for the future. After all, both the Xbox 360 and PS3 support 1080p, as do Blu Ray players and Blu Ray discs. By the way, my TV also has a full resolution VGA input, that I have my first generation Xbox 360 on (the first generation Xbox 360's did not support HDMI). So in theory I could very easily use my computer on my 50" TV at a very, very high resolution. So if you find the right 37" or 42" TV, you could easily do the same if it supports it.

Every TV has built in speakers, naturally, so that's not an issue. Some even do a decent job of simulating surround sound. It's cheap enough to pick up a decent surround sound system as well. All of the consoles sound great in 5.1 surround sound, even the Wii (which doesn't support quite what the PS3 or 360 does, but still sounds good).

So, in summary, I implore you, shop around on the clearance sites like http://www.edealinfo.com/ , ecost, buy.com, Amazon.com, whatever, for the best possible deal (maybe even some stores), and go for 1080p whatever, be it DLP, Plasma or LCD, and you'll be much better off. You'll still hit your general price point and be much, much happier long term.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Mark Vergeer
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26" or 32" samsung LCD tv

TV: TV 32x32 pixels We have a 32" and a 26" Samsung LCD tv we use for watching HD-TV/Digital TV and console gaming. Using those as a computer monitor is possible but not advisable.

The scalers built-in-to those tv sets is rather good so old analog RF/Composite/s-Video/RGB-Scart signals come out great. The tv's feature a special game-mode so lag is not a problem. We are very happy with the Samsung tvs.

Xbox 360: Lactobacillus P | Wii: 8151 3435 8469 3138
Armchair arcade Editor | Pixellator | www.markvergeer.nl

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