Did we really land on the moon?

Matt Barton's picture
Yes
100% (5 votes)
No
0% (0 votes)
Total votes: 5

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Mark Vergeer
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Joined: 01/16/2006
Built-in into some people

Being paranoid is something that just seems to built-in into some folk. They are usually people who are quick to draw conclusions without being presented with all the facts. They form quite large part of the population in general - fear and anxiety is what keeps people clinging to these beliefs. It has nothing to do with logic.

In 1993 When I visited Graceland I was told the old-aunt of Elvis was still living in the house and she could sometimes be spotted and the whiff of smelled bacon was her doing - according to the tour-guide. Well I had to laugh and a lot of people around me took this very very seriously. You could actually hear people telling each other that they didn't believe Elvis was dead - " how come his house still looked so nice? It sure wasn't the aunt alone - he must be here. He's just tired of performing. He's resting. "
When I came back in 2008 there still was the smell of bacon and the story of the aunt being told. The same voices denying Elvis is dead etc.... Of course the aunt was no-where to be seen and the smell of bacon near the kitchen seems to be forever present -> that aunt - if she exists - must be very obese by now if she ate all that bacon

I am no particular fan of Elvis, it is just that a roadtrip with different friends took us past Memphis Tennessee and one cannot pass by Graceland without a visit. Well next time I'll pass and I'll wait outside.

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Matt Barton
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Joined: 01/16/2006
Conspiracies are an

Conspiracies are an interesting concept and usually pretty circular. For instance, in history there are countless examples of successful and failed conspiracies, but usually the truth gets out pretty quickly after the event. They are by nature difficult to contain because, by definition, they involve more than one person, and usually individuals who are high profile. The chance of a successful and enduring high-level conspiracy involving thousands of people is, if not ridiculous, at least highly unlikely.

Of course, a conspiracy theorist could always say, well, there are all those conspiracies we don't know about because they were successful. That's what I mean by "circular." The conspiracy theorists try to lay the burden of proof on the folks involved--asking them to prove there wasn't a conspiracy--while they trot out "evidence" that is open to interpretation at best.

I guess what's more interesting to me is the motivation behind these conspiracy theories. Why would you want to believe that we didn't go to the moon? I can understand (however nutty it may be) those who want to believe Elvis Presley is still alive, or that there really is a big foot, UFOs, or whatever. But there are some that just seem pointless to me. What, is the idea simply that our space program sucked? It would make more sense if the Russians or countries with anti-U.S. sentiment were going on about it, but Americans?? I just don't get it.

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Bill Loguidice
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Conspiracies
Matt Barton wrote:

I agree. What perplexes me, though, is how many people seem to buy into the conspiracy theories--and to be honest, they do have some pretty convincing points. The whole fiasco with the lost footage really added fuel to the fire as well (though apparently footage from later landings are intact).

I think you'd have to be pretty much a nut, though, to believe the whole thing was a hoax. There were just too many people involved. I'd be far more convinced if former astronauts or NASA officials were saying it was a hoax.

Just the fact that there were multiple missions I think puts the whole thing to rest if nothing else. A conspiracy does not happen multiple times, it's always a one-off, be it JFK, Roswell, 9-11, etc., though I don't buy any of those either.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Matt Barton
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Joined: 01/16/2006
I agree. What perplexes me,

I agree. What perplexes me, though, is how many people seem to buy into the conspiracy theories--and to be honest, they do have some pretty convincing points. The whole fiasco with the lost footage really added fuel to the fire as well (though apparently footage from later landings are intact).

I think you'd have to be pretty much a nut, though, to believe the whole thing was a hoax. There were just too many people involved. I'd be far more convinced if former astronauts or NASA officials were saying it was a hoax.

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Bill Loguidice
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Joined: 12/31/1969
As conspiracy theories go,

As conspiracy theories go, to my mind, the moon landing hoax has always been the lamest.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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