Casual Photos: Boxed 3DO, Apple II, C-64, CD-i and PC DOS Games (with brief commentary)

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Today's casual photos, taken with my iPhone 3G, are another mixed bag of boxed games, this time featuring the 3DO, Apple II, C-64, CD-i and PC DOS platforms, sometimes in the same box and/or on the same disk. I'll provide some brief commentary along with the photos below for the following titles: Night Trap (Digital Pictures, 1994, 3DO), Star Control II (Crystal Dynamics, 1994, 3DO), ShockWave: Operation Jumpgate (Electronic Arts, 1994, 3DO), The 7th Guest (Philips, 1993, CD-i), Immercenary (Electronic Arts, 1995, 3DO), Burn: Cycle (Philips, 1994, CD-i), The Chase on Tom Sawyer's Island (Walt Disney, Hi-Tech Expressions, 1988, Apple II, C-64, PC DOS), Storm (Mastertronic, 1986, C-64, PC DOS), G.I. Joe (Epyx, 1985, C-64), Pac-Man (Thunder Mountain, 1983, C-64), and Donald Duck's Playground (Sierra, 1986, C-64).

Night Trap (Digital Pictures, 1994, 3DO): This is of course the later 3DO port of the controversial Sega CD original, which, along with Mortal Kombat, spurred the industry on to self rating and then the creation of the ESRB we have today. Naturally there's very little controversial about the game, but is that ever really important when someone gets their ire up about an "important" issue? Of the many ports, this is among the best versions made thanks to the processing power of the 3DO and its ability to push more colors, etc.

Star Control II (Crystal Dynamics, 1994, 3DO): This is obviously the second (and some say best) entry in the legendary series and the 3DO has a spot-on port of the PC original, with lush audio-visuals for the type of game it is. It's one of the more popular games to collect for the 3DO.

ShockWave: Operation Jumpgate (Electronic Arts, 1994, 3DO): This requires the original ShockWave game and is one of the few true expansion packs for a console system.

The 7th Guest (Philips, 1993, CD-i): This is the Dutch version of the famous Myst contemporary. I also have the French version, though I believe this Dutch version is actually in English. The 7th Guest requires the digital video add-on (it's built-in on some models), which, besides creating better than VHS-quality video, also increased system memory. I was working at Electronics Boutique during college back when this game was being showcased by Philips, and it was used to demonstrate the power of the system, which was able to run the game better (more or less) than the most expensive high end 486 PC at the time.

Immercenary (Electronic Arts, 1995, 3DO): This is a late life hybrid First Person Shooter for the 3DO that contains some interesting RPG elements.

Burn: Cycle (Philips, 1994, CD-i): This is an adventure puzzle game for the CD-i that naturally relies on a lot of quality full motion video, though does NOT require the system's digital video option. This is considered one of the platform's best games.

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The Chase on Tom Sawyer's Island (Walt Disney, Hi-Tech Expressions, 1988, Apple II, C-64, PC DOS): Walt Disney handled the PC DOS version of this, while Hi-Tech Expressions did the Apple II/C-64 "flippy" disk (Apple II on one side, C-64 on the other). Both versions are in the box. Despite seeming to promise more, this is essentially a variation on Pac-Man.

Storm (Mastertronic, 1986, C-64, PC DOS): This is a "flippy" action game, with the PC DOS version on one side of the disk and the C-64 version on the other.

G.I. Joe (Epyx, 1985, C-64): Fans of Armchair Arcade will know this game well. It's one of the audio-visual highlights on the C-64, and is a very good and very ambitious interpretation of the license. And I can almost guarantee it will be far better playing this than watching the forthcoming film...

Pac-Man (Thunder Mountain, 1983, C-64): It's Pac-Man. On the C-64. I'm not quite sure what relation this does or does not have to the Atarisoft version, but I'm pretty sure Thunder Mountain was just a budget range. The packaging only refers to Namco.

Donald Duck's Playground (Sierra, 1986, C-64): Yes, that Sierra, who had quite a few Disney licensed software releases dating back to the early 80's, though most were educational releases outside of a few adventure games. This was naturally an educational release for younger kids, but it consisted of challenging mini-games. I played this as a kid back on my C-64 in an *ahem* "trial" version, and some of the mini-games were quite fun. This actually had very high quality production values, and it's a shame that Sierra didn't do more on the C-64.

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Comments

Catatonic
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Joined: 05/20/2006
We used to play that Donald

We used to play that Donald Duck game in school. The classroom had a bunch of Commodore 64 and PET computers. Naturally we all wanted to play on the 64's most of the time! (Actually the PET system was cool. They were all networked and shared a disk drive and printer. We had a math game that would give you merit points, and saved them so you could build up a big score during the school year, and print them out.)

Bill Loguidice
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Donald Duck and PETs
Catatonic wrote:

We used to play that Donald Duck game in school. The classroom had a bunch of Commodore 64 and PET computers. Naturally we all wanted to play on the 64's most of the time! (Actually the PET system was cool. They were all networked and shared a disk drive and printer. We had a math game that would give you merit points, and saved them so you could build up a big score during the school year, and print them out.)

Did you ever see the Educator 64? It was a Commodore 64 inside a PET case. The big downside though was that the monitor was a green screen monitor. It's what has stopped me from collecting one, though I collect everything else Commodore. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Educator_64

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Catatonic
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Our schools had tons of

Our schools had tons of Commodore stuff where I grew up, but I never saw an "Educator". Weird! Never saw an Amiga either, though at one point we had Commodore-branded 286 & 386 PC clones.

One of my classes also had a Unisys ICON, specially made for Canadian schools:
http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?st=1&c=971
It had a built in trackball and animation software. You drew key frames and it automatically animated the in-betweens. Really neat for the mid-80's.

Bill Loguidice
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My school system had one or

My school system had one or two Apple II's, and the rest were TRS-80's, first Model III's/IV's and later Tandy 1000's. My college was old IBM PC's, miscellaneous PC clones and a few Macs. There were a couple of Amigas in the Communications department that I was in, which served video editing functions.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Matt Barton
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Joined: 01/16/2006
I never saw anything at my

I never saw anything at my schools but Apple, Apple clones (Franklin), and later IBM PC clones. Definitely nothing exotic.

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Catatonic
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Joined: 05/20/2006
I guess my little area of

I guess my little area of the world was just nuts for Commodore in the 80's. I never even saw an Apple II. Then in the 90's it was basically nothing but beige PC clones and beige Macintoshes. (The Mac had established itself as THE computer to have for creative work)

Rowdy Rob
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Joined: 09/04/2006
My school had....

Our school had TRS-80 Model I's and Model III's, a computer lab with about a dozen Atari 800's (equipped with Microsoft Basic cartridges over the built-in Atari Basic), several punchcard machines for programming the school mainframe, and an Apple II system. We nerds in the "Microcomputer Club" had our own room with a TRS-80 Model I and the Apple II system. The TRS-80 wasn't ever used much after the Apple II arrived.

There was also an odd, kit-built computer that I don't recall the name of. I think it was either a Heathkit or an Osbourne. Nobody messed with it. (It WASN'T an Apple I).

qoj hpmoj o+ 6uo73q 3Jv 3svq jnoh 77V

Calibrator
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Joined: 10/25/2006
Atari BASIC
Rowdy Rob wrote:

Our school had TRS-80 Model I's and Model III's, a computer lab with about a dozen Atari 800's (equipped with Microsoft Basic cartridges over the built-in Atari Basic),

I suspect this wasn't the original Atari 800 but the 800 XL model as the original 800 didn't have built-in BASIC?

Quote:

The TRS-80 wasn't ever used much after the Apple II arrived.

I bet! We had around eight Apple II+ (Europlus) in our computer room but only one with a color monitor - guess which one was the favorite!
Especially after some guys found their way to pirated stuff like "Mask of the Sun" etc.

Never really had a chance to play on them, though.

take care,
Calibrator

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Mark Vergeer
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Joined: 01/16/2006
My school had...

My school had a TRS-80 computer Lab, I believe them to be Model III's. Then the science department got a c64 and an interface that could become an oscilloscope but they didn't get the software for it. So me and a friend actually did the software for it.
In later years the computer lab was extended to have Philips XT/AT machines - still all MS-DOS though.

At University I got introduced to Motif/Xwindows, Unix, Vax and witnessed Linux emerge and taking over the computers of Science / IT students.

One of my professors gave me his old Mac when he got a newer model and this is when I started to use Macs besides other systems. Never was without a Mac. I even had a Mac Plus with a 10Mb harddrive. It still works and it still contains some university-stuff.

Xbox 360: Lactobacillus P | Wii: 8151 3435 8469 3138
Armchair arcade Editor | Pixellator | www.markvergeer.nl

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Bill Loguidice
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Behind the times
Mark Vergeer wrote:

At University I got introduced to Motif/Xwindows, Unix, Vax and witnessed Linux emerge and taking over the computers of Science / IT students.

My only exposure to UNIX was SCO UNIX System V on a Compaq server, when I was the Technical Writer/Network Administrator/Webmaster for a medium sized staffing company in the mid- to late-90's. It was a basic server for DOS machines running LANtastic and ran WordPerfect 5.1. I learned a lot on that text-based system and even took a UNIX class, but the rest of the world was already well into GUI-based systems by then and I certainly craved an X-Windows upgrade on that box. It never came and by the time I left we were already transitioning to a purely Windows 95+ environment.

I found it funny that in college and the business world they were always AT LEAST a generation or two or three behind what home users were, simply because of the huge overhead involved in upgrades/changes. It should actually be the OTHER way around in a perfect world, but it never will be.

Books!
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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