500 gigs on a single disc!

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Matt Barton
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Joined: 01/16/2006

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/8021012.stm

I've heard off and on about this tech for some time now, but it looks like it's finally getting ready for production. Looks like I may have done the smart thing holding off on buying a blu-ray and starting a collection.

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Catatonic
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Joined: 05/20/2006
I think we North Americans

I think we North Americans have a preference for very large TV's. (Along with cars, refrigerators and houses) 42 inches seems to be pretty normal here! Or even bigger if you're an unmarried man, ha ha.

Mark Vergeer
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The thing is....

There's quite a large number of folk that can only tell something is a HD TV because it is a flat-screen. Most people's eyes aren't that good to really enjoy a 4K picture in a regular big tv format (26", 32" or 40") - the optical resolution of most people's retinas just isn't up to that. Now if you have a vision of say 1.6 you might be able to got something out of a full HD tv playing a bluray on a 26" or 32" TV (which most people seem to own) but most people with visions around 1.0 will not really be able to tell the difference between blueray and an upscaled DVD on those tv-sets. So HDReady/Full HD will probably be satisfactory for most people. 4K pixels in regular tv formats will probably not fly - unless they are used as computer monitors. Come to think of it quite a few people are actually upscaling the font-size when they use over 24" computer monitors because the regular font size becomes too small for them to read.
Of course when the screens grow larger and larger nobody wants to look at lego-block-sized pixels so perhaps then 4K pixel resolutions might be gaining popularity. But I won't want a wall-sized tv in my living room - it would destroy the comfy atmosphere. I only would like to have such a thing in a special movie-room. We kept our TV-down to 26" just because of the limited impact on our living space it has compared to a 40" monster. Perhaps in other parts of the world over 40" screens are the norm.

A friend of mine who has worked in audio/visual stores has commented that more than once he has seen people actually go for a larger size standard rez Plasma screen instead of the HDReady LCD - just because of the bright colours and the bigger sized screen. They didn't seem to care for more pixels - they just want a big and colourful screen. Despite the explanation they were given about HD TV etc. Now here in the Netherlands HDTV-signals haven't penetrated as much as they have in the US but slowly digital TV and HD signals are on the rise. Still quite a few 'uninterested' lay consumers really seem to go for the big screen - as long as the DVDs look good on it they don't really care. They call it flatscreen-TV and size does seem to matter.

But perhaps the Dutch are an ignorant people when it comes to HDTV.

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Armchair arcade Editor | Pixellator | www.markvergeer.nl

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Catatonic
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Joined: 05/20/2006
Maybe in another 5-10 years

Maybe in another 5-10 years they will try to introduce a new format with 4K picture resolution, it would be truly equivalent to theatre projection.

Bill Loguidice
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Joined: 12/31/1969
This will take years to get

This will take years to get to market, if ever, particularly on the consumer side. DVD is satisfactory for the majority of people, but those with HDTVs will certainly benefit from BluRay. Nevertheless, even those with HDTVs can do just fine with upscaled DVDs, particularly if they don't have a particularly good surround sound system.

With that said, being built into the PS3 certainly works in BluRay's favor, but frankly, if BluRay doesn't REALLY catch on, this new technology has no real shot whatsoever. If BluRay fails, it will be because digital distribution has become a preferred format. There's no particular space limitation with BluRay at this point, and certainly capacities can be increased without breaking compatibility. With that in mind, we STILL need consumer BluRay recorders to drop in price and the associated media. I can just imagine how much this supersized disc format will cost, particularly since they won't be playing in the consumer arena for quite some time and won't even be able to sniff economies of scale until they do so.

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Xbox 360: billlog | Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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