Matt Chat#2: Myst is Now Live!

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Matt Chat #2: Myst is now live! Please watch, subscribe, rate it, comment on it, have fun!

I tried to tweak the audio and what not this go round, so let me know what you think.

Related Content:

Trilobyte's "7th Guest" (1993): Matt's review of 7th Guest.
Myst: My various writings on Myst and its sequels.

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Rob Daviau
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Even more impressed than!
Matt Barton wrote:

Hi, Oldschoolgamer!

I'm using Windows Movie Maker for all the editing work. It's pretty limited, but it came with my system - so I'm not complaining. To capture Myst, I used a free product called Cam Studio. It seemed to do a good job, though granted it took some tinkering with the settings.

To record video, I'm using either a Microsoft LifeCam or a digital video camera (one checked out from the campus library). Admittedly, it's an awkward setup (I had to sit on the floor with a camera perched on a cooler and a CD spindle). I should really invest in a decent digital video camera and a tripod. I'd also very much like a vintage armchair of some sort I could sit in to add more atmosphere to the segments (going with the theme of armchair arcade).

I guess one of the advantages of being poor is that you get familiar with every free and cheap tool out there! :)

Well pretty simple, sometimes that is best. Knowing all that makes the end result even more impressive! Thanks for the info.
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Oldschool games, some people just don't "get it"...

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yakumo9275
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nice vid. Myst was one of

nice vid. Myst was one of those games I never 'got'. It bored me to tears and I didnt understand the appeal...

-- Stu --

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Bill Loguidice
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Myst
yakumo9275 wrote:

nice vid. Myst was one of those games I never 'got'. It bored me to tears and I didnt understand the appeal...

-- Stu --

I'm with you on that. That was one of the good things about working with Matt on the book, as we have somewhat different interests in games and we could minimize a lot of writing about games we weren't familiar with or didn't like. Even if we wrote it on our own, we would have written it where for no one to notice any particular bias against a particular game, but it certainly helps if someone is writing about something they know and respect. My only respect for Myst is historical and how it helped with early CD-ROM adoption and sold so many copies and intrigued many non-gamers, and the fact that it was done mostly by two brothers. Otherwise I find it to be a sterile slideshow with limited interactivity and obtuse puzzles. I have quite a few versions of it, though, just through the natural course of collecting, including for the Atari Jaguar, 3DO and CD-i...

Vintage Games book!
Xbox 360: billlog | Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Matt Barton
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I was talking to a former

I was talking to a former propmaster today, and apparently I'd need at least $125 for a decent looking armchair, and that's from Salvation Army. Sigh.

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Rowdy Rob
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props
Matt Barton wrote:

I was talking to a former propmaster today, and apparently I'd need at least $125 for a decent looking armchair, and that's from Salvation Army. Sigh.

The only props you really need are YOU and your subject matter. I like the fact that both you and Oldschoolgamer/MaximumRD (and Bill, of course) "keep it real," intelligently presenting your subject matter to your "base" without a bunch of profanity or "death metal" music to make the video seem more "rad" or such. Forget about the armchair and spend your money on something else (like games!). The chair you sit in would be only of minor (if any) significance to your viewers, in my opinion.

The subjects are interesting to those of us in the "base," and it is also very interesting to see the personalities themselves. I guess that's why MaximumRD innately knew that his "post office trip" would be interesting to his fans, especially in the context of the excitement of classic gaming! YOU are interesting, and thus your subjects are interesting.

Now when you guys start putting up videos of yourselves shopping for hemorrhoidal ointments, that's when I'll tune out.

qoj hpmoj o+ 6uo73q 3Jv 3svq jnoh 77V

yakumo9275
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I thought the game that

I thought the game that really kicked cdrom off was 'Under a killing moon' (mean streets 2).
I dont remember how far apart they came out.

btw mean streets 1 rocked on the c64.. I had fond memories of it. never played any of the follow ups. I guess its one of those forgotten games.

-- Stu --

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Calibrator
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Star Wars: Rebel Assault
yakumo9275 wrote:

I thought the game that really kicked cdrom off was 'Under a killing moon' (mean streets 2).

UAKM is the one game in the series I didn't play and I think it's terrible that the series ended! Mobygames says it's from 1994 (DOS), while Myst is from 1993 (Mac).
IIRC, "Star Wars: Rebel Assault" (1993, DOS) is often credited as the CD-ROM pioneer for PCs. Keyword: "drive bundles"...

take care,
Calibrator

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Bill Loguidice
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CD-ROM adoption and some personal stories

It's not so much who was first - in that case Cyan's The Manhole probably qualifies, though it's more edutainment or a type of kid's adventure game - or with who came out before or around the same time and had some popularity - a la "Under a Killing Moon" or "Star Wars: Rebel Assault" - it's who actually drove people to either upgrade their current systems to the necessary MMC standard or replace their systems entirely, and that game was undeniably Myst. Even non-gamers were aware of or interested in the game. I know, as I was well into the PC scene by then and witnessed it first hand. So while gamers such as myself vastly preferred "Return to Zork", as one example, the reality was it was that "Myst" was the star of the day and in actuality that era. And certainly the sales figures bare that out. It was good that "Myst" came to PC shortly after the Mac as well, as it would not have had the same impact had it not been on the dominant PC platform.

As a personal aside, I still was chugging along with my 386 SX-20 with 5MB of RAM and 80MB hard drive at the time of Myst's PC release. I even added a 2X CD-ROM drive. I sold that to family friends of my girlfriend at the time, and it's interesting that one of their complaints was that it was unable to play Myst (which it was). They bought a new system shortly thereafter. After selling the 386 SX-20, my father (through my guidance) got me a Gateway Pentium-90 with 16MB of RAM and much larger hard drive. It also had a gorgeous 15" Sony Trinitron flat screen monitor. I had run "Doom" a bit on my 386 SX-20, but it wasn't much of anything on that (the SX-20 was able to handle "Wolfenstein 3D" and "Blake Stone" well enough), but on the P5-90 it became something truly spectacular (I think I relate that story as a brief footnote in the "Vintage Games" book). Interestingly, while my girlfriend and I played through all of "Return to Zork" we never were able to progress far in "Myst"; it was actually a big letdown in comparison. Whereas "Return to Zork" featured more active segments and lots of live actors, as well as generally more accessible puzzles, "Myst" as I said seemed sterile in comparison. I suppose it's all in what you're exposed to first. Perhaps if we had played "Myst" first it might have been more intriguing (at least to her).

Vintage Games book!
Xbox 360: billlog | Wii: 1345 2773 2048 1586 | PS3: ArmchairArcade
Bill Loguidice, Managing Director | Armchair Arcade, Inc.

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Matt Barton
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I guess Myst (like The Sims)

I guess Myst (like The Sims) just isn't for everybody. I do remember how popular Riven was back when it came out, though. Almost all of my friends were into it- thought the ones that didn't were more into action games like Street Fighter II. The series definitely got less popular starting with Myst III--by that point, everyone had gotten into shooters, RPGs, and strategy games (especially Might & Magic and Heroes of M&M).

My favorite Myst game is definitely Myst IV, though V is nice as well. Myst III has my favorite villain. Riven is just so hard that I don't enjoy it. One lovely thing about the Myst anniversary edition is that it has a built-in hint system that is very good (just enough to point you in the right direction without giving you the answer). Though, if you're still stuck, you can get it to give you the answer.

BTW, my next video is going to be "Defender of the Crown" on the good ol' Amiga system.

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Matt Barton
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It's really odd to see so

It's really odd to see so many AA'ers dissing Myst. I don't think I've come across hardly any other gamers (well, beyond noobs) who don't rave about it. I wonder if we might be resistant because of our vast previous experience with so many other games, whereas many computer gamers of the early 1990s were first seriously exposed to gaming via Myst and Doom. Like Bill suggests, I think things would be a lot different if Myst was one of the first PC games you ever really got into.

I might add as well that there was a rumor (or maybe "attitude" or "expectation") that Myst was an IQ test of sorts. What people told me about the game was that you had to be a real genius or at least really smart to beat it. Once I heard that, of course I wanted to give it a try. To admit that you couldn't get very far into it was almost like confessing your ignorance. Of course, that's all nonsense, but there was a Mensa like quality to it that we probably should consider when explaining the game's popularity. I remember talking to many people who saw the game as a real personal challenge--something they just HAD to beat to prove to themselves that they were smart.

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